things that matter

Here’s Why A DACA Beneficiary Was Forced To Leave The US To Mexico, Where He Was Kidnapped And Killed

Manuel Cano

Nineteen-year-old Manuel Antonio Cano Pacheco — a former DACA beneficiary — returned to Mexico, after being advised to do so by his lawyer.

Cano Pacheco lived in Des Moines, Iowa, after coming to the U.S illegally at the age of three and attended high school there. However, last year Cano Pacheco was charged with two misdemeanors, which meant that he lost his DACA status, CNN reports. That meant that Cano Pacheco was now vulnerable for deportation.

While awaiting his immigration hearing, Cano Pacheco was charged with yet another misdemeanor and his lawyer advised him to leave the U.S. voluntarily in order to not face the harsh penalties of a formal deportation, which could include being barred from re-entering the U.S. for ten years.

On April 10, Cano Pacheco returned to Mexico and three weeks later he was killed.

His family say they have no idea why Cano Pacheco would be targeted considering he had yet to meet up with any family there.

“He didn’t have any problems,” his mother said, according to CNN. “He didn’t know anyone in Mexico. He didn’t even know our family until he got there. He went to the store at 5 p.m. on a Friday. Then he went missing.”

On May 18, ABC News is reporting that Cano Pacheco was kidnapped and killed in Zacatecas, Mexico.

His family could not attend his funeral in Mexico because his mom didn’t want to risk not being able to return to the U.S.

“The entire family is devastated,” his mother said to CNN. “I almost wanted to return to Mexico but my other children don’t have passports and I would risk not being able to come back. We’ve never left the country before.”

Cano Pacheco leaves behind three siblings and a one-year son.

“He was really happy in Iowa. It was the only home he knew,” his mom said. “He loved school and loved soccer. On his days off from school he would work as a mechanic.”


READ: After Four Years Fighting In The Marines, This Deported Veteran Came Back To The US In A Casket

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Here’s Your Reminder Of The Caesar Salad’s Mexican Roots

Culture

Here’s Your Reminder Of The Caesar Salad’s Mexican Roots

Taste.com

Those who don’t know any better give Mexican food a bad rap for being cheap and greasy. However, the Mexican culinary world expands far past Taco Bell and Taco Cabana. Authentic Mexican food is fresh, bold, delicious and versatile.

In fact, Mexico is responsible for one of the biggest fine dining staples there is.

Mexico is, in fact, the birthplace of the creamy and crisp Caesar salad.

Twitter / @oucrimsongirl

As the story goes, the Caesar salad was created in Tijuana, Mexico by an Italian restaurateur named Caesar Cardini. It was 1924 when Cardini established his restaurant in the tourist destination to cater to American guests escaping prohibition. While no one really knows the true story, most agree the salad was created over 4th of July holiday weekend.

Supposedly, the dish was completely improvised. Cardini is said to have thrown together several ingredients he had at his disposal and it created the fresh, delicious gourmet salad.

Twitter / @ladelandleaf

According to What’s Cooking America, the original recipe used a base of romain lettuce leafs. Additionally, garlic, parmesan cheese, croutons, boiled eggs, olive oil and Worcestershire sauce were added.

Rumor has it that it was Cardini’s brother, Alex, that added anchovies in 1926. He named his remix the “Aviator’s Salad.” Still, this anchovy-filled dish was so popular that it became known as the official Caesar salad.

Parts of this story is hard to prove, but it comes with a famous witness to offer some legitimacy to it.

Twitter / @keatonkildebell

The famous English chef, Julia Child, shared her first encounter with the iconic salad. In her book, “From Julia Child’s Kitchen,” the chef recounted her experience in a Tijuana restaurant. She wrote:

“My parents, of course, ordered the salad. Caesar himself rolled the big cart up to the table, tossed the romaine in a great wooden bowl, and I wish I could say I remembered his every move, but I don’t. They only thing I see again clearly is the eggs. I can see him break 2 eggs over that romaine and roll them in, the greens going all creamy as the eggs flowed over them. Two eggs in a salad? Two one-minute coddled eggs? And garlic-flavored croutons, and grated Parmesan cheese? It was a sensation of a salad from coast to coast, and there were even rumblings of its success in Europe.”

It’s popularity in Europe cause people to mistakenly think the Caesar salad is Italian.

Twitter / @Kylie_greenlee
Twitter / @2FlyT

However, the dish is 100% authentically Mexican cuisine. To recognize the delectable salad, in 1953, it was declared “the greatest recipe to originate from the Americas in 50 years” by the International Society of Epicure. We wouldn’t expect anything less from this Mexican classic.

Migrants Children Are Getting Sick In Detention Centers But The Trump Administration Doesn’t Want To Give Them Toothbrushes

Things That Matter

Migrants Children Are Getting Sick In Detention Centers But The Trump Administration Doesn’t Want To Give Them Toothbrushes

Spencer Platt / Staff | Getty Images

It’s no secret that the U.S. government isn’t taking care of migrants at the border or detention camps. Undocumented people that are living under U.S. care are getting sick. They’re being exposed to the measles, chicken pox, common colds due to extreme air-conditioned facilities, abuse, and so much more. What makes this situation so much more infuriating is that the government could care less than people are getting sick.

This video of Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian went viral over the weekend because she was telling judges that undocumented people in detention camps don’t need soap, toothpaste or beds to sleep.

Fabian spoke with three Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal judges and said that they shouldn’t be required to give undocumented people hygiene products or beds to sleep in because those things are seen as privileges.

The case is based on a 1997 ruling known as the “Flores Agreement” that “requires, among other things, that the government hold minors in facilities that are “safe and sanitary” and that they are released from confinement without delay whenever possible.”

Here’s a portion of the transcript:

Judge Wallace Tashima: “If you don’t have a toothbrush, if you don’t have soap if you don’t have a blanket, it’s not safe and sanitary. Wouldn’t everybody agree with that? Do you agree with that?”

Sarah Fabian: “Well, I think it’ s—I think those are—there is fair reason to find that those things may be part of safe and sanitary.”

Judge Tashima: “Not ‘maybe.’ ‘Are’ a part. What do you say, ‘may be’? You mean there are circumstances when a person doesn’t need to have a toothbrush, toothpaste, and soap for days?”

Fabian: “Well, I think, in CBP custody, there’ s—it’s frequently intended to be much shorter-term, so it may be that for a shorter-term stay in CBP custody that some of those things may not be required.”

However, we know that the Trump administration is seeking to change that rule to allow for indefinite detention of children and migrants.

The judges were clearly frustrated with her and she could barely answer their questions properly.

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

Vice President Mike Pence tried to get out of answering why undocumented migrants wouldn’t need hygiene products while being detained during a CNN interview and basically didn’t even know what the hearing was all about.

“Aren’t toothbrushes and blankets and medicine basic conditions for kids?” CNN’s Jake Tapper asked Pence, “Aren’t they a part of how the United States of America—the Trump administration—treats children?”

Pence replied by saying, “Well, of course, they are Jake,” and claimed he couldn’t “speak to what that lawyer was saying.”

Now a team of doctors and attorneys who have seen the migrants up close are releasing their findings and claim that virtually everyone they saw was sick.

Credit: @TexasTribune / Twitter

“The kids had colds and were sick and said they didn’t have access to soap to wash their hands. It was an alcohol-based cleanser,” Clara Long, a senior researcher for Human Rights Watch said to CNN. “Some kids who were detained for 2-3 weeks had only one or two opportunities to shower. One said they hadn’t showered in three weeks. Hygiene and living conditions like this creates a risk of spreading infectious disease. It makes me very concerned about the public health emergency.”

Holly Cooper, co-director of the University of California, Davis’ Immigration Law Clinic and represents detained youth, put it this way, according to the Associated Press, “In my 22 years of doing visits with children in detention, I have never heard of this level of inhumanity.”

READ: Historians And AOC Agree That Detention Centers Look Like Concentration Camps But Conservatives Don’t Want To Hear It

Paid Promoted Stories