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Here’s Why A DACA Beneficiary Was Forced To Leave The US To Mexico, Where He Was Kidnapped And Killed

Manuel Cano

Nineteen-year-old Manuel Antonio Cano Pacheco — a former DACA beneficiary — returned to Mexico, after being advised to do so by his lawyer.

Cano Pacheco lived in Des Moines, Iowa, after coming to the U.S illegally at the age of three and attended high school there. However, last year Cano Pacheco was charged with two misdemeanors, which meant that he lost his DACA status, CNN reports. That meant that Cano Pacheco was now vulnerable for deportation.

While awaiting his immigration hearing, Cano Pacheco was charged with yet another misdemeanor and his lawyer advised him to leave the U.S. voluntarily in order to not face the harsh penalties of a formal deportation, which could include being barred from re-entering the U.S. for ten years.

On April 10, Cano Pacheco returned to Mexico and three weeks later he was killed.

His family say they have no idea why Cano Pacheco would be targeted considering he had yet to meet up with any family there.

“He didn’t have any problems,” his mother said, according to CNN. “He didn’t know anyone in Mexico. He didn’t even know our family until he got there. He went to the store at 5 p.m. on a Friday. Then he went missing.”

On May 18, ABC News is reporting that Cano Pacheco was kidnapped and killed in Zacatecas, Mexico.

His family could not attend his funeral in Mexico because his mom didn’t want to risk not being able to return to the U.S.

“The entire family is devastated,” his mother said to CNN. “I almost wanted to return to Mexico but my other children don’t have passports and I would risk not being able to come back. We’ve never left the country before.”

Cano Pacheco leaves behind three siblings and a one-year son.

“He was really happy in Iowa. It was the only home he knew,” his mom said. “He loved school and loved soccer. On his days off from school he would work as a mechanic.”


READ: After Four Years Fighting In The Marines, This Deported Veteran Came Back To The US In A Casket

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The US Government Is Trying To Restrict The Reasons People Can Seek Asylum, Starting With Domestic Violence

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The US Government Is Trying To Restrict The Reasons People Can Seek Asylum, Starting With Domestic Violence

TIME / YouTube

Attorney General Jeff Sessions last week overturned asylum protections for domestic violence and gang violence victims. This announcement could potentially prevent thousands of immigrants from getting protection in the United States. The ruling overturned a grant of asylum to a Salvadoran woman whose former husband raped and beat her for 15 years. Sessions told immigration judges that the ruling “restores sound principles of asylum and long-standing principles of immigration law.” This overturns a precedent set during the President Obama administration that allowed women to claim credible fears of domestic violence but now will make it tougher for such arguments to succeed in immigration courts.

The number of people claiming a credible fear of persecution jumped from 5,000 in 2009 to 94,000 in 2016.

To qualify for asylum, an individual must establish that they have a fear of persecution in their homeland based on their race, religion, nationality or political opinion. Few asylum seekers are usually granted full permanent entry into the United States. The process can take months or years while the refugee lives freely in the US while their case is taken up the courts.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions says those seeking entry to the US are claiming asylum or refugee status on too broad terms.

“Generally, claims by aliens pertaining to domestic violence or gang violence perpetrated by non-governmental actors will not qualify for asylum,” Sessions wrote in a statement to judges. “The mere fact that a country may have problems effectively policing certain crimes such as domestic violence or gang violence or that certain populations are more likely to be victims of crime, cannot itself establish an asylum claim.”

According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all people are allowed to seek refuge and asylum from persecution in their home countries.

Many on social media are angry at the ruling because it might set precedent on future immigration policies.

Monday’s ruling is the latest effort by the Trump administration to stop asylum protections for thousands of immigrants, particularly those fleeing rampant gang violence and high homicide rates in Central America.

The overturned policy means potentially thousands of victims of targeted violence will face tougher restrictions in the asylum request process.

Sessions said it’s still possible that crime victims could get asylum in the United States, but would have to pass a tougher test in the courts. This include showing that their country’s government is unable or unwilling to protect them and that they cannot safely relocate to another part of their country.


READ: Transgender Honduran Woman Died In ICE Custody, Weeks After Seeking Asylum

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