Things That Matter

One Of The Major Artists In The Chicano Art Movement Has Died At 75

On May 29, René Yañez, a man instrumental in shaping and cultivating the Chicano art scene in the Bay Area, died from prostate and bone cancer at age 75. Yañez, an artist, curator and social justice activist was the co-founder of Galería De La Raza and the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Yañez has been curating the beloved SOMArts’ annual Dia de Los Muertos group art show in the Mission District for years. However, he was one of the first curators that presented arts shows centered around Day of the Dead in the U.S. back in the early ’70s. Yañez was also Director of Special Projects and Building Manager at SOMArts.

Rio Yañez, René’s son, posted the news of his death on Facebook and wrote that he had been preparing for this exact moment for the past four years.

Hi Everyone, my Dad passed away this morning about an hour ago. He was surrounded by people who loved him and having…

Posted by Rio Yañez on Tuesday, May 29, 2018

“Rene is my Father, my creative partner, and my best friend,” Rio writes. “I miss him so much already. These last two weeks have been the hardest of my life but I’ve had a partner and extended family that have taken such great care me. I may be grieving but please know I that feel incredibly loved and supported right now.”

René had been working until the very end. In March, he presented his retrospective exhibition titled “Into The Fade.”

René put on his retrospective all the while receiving weekly infusions of chemotherapy or blood, according to Mission Local.

“The artist, who has lived in the Mission District for most of his adult life, said that when he told his doctor earlier this year that he was thinking of doing a show in the fall, ‘the doctor told me, ‘You’d better do it sooner.’ So I’m doing it sooner.’ He laughed at the thought that he might beat his prognosis. ‘I’m playing this out.'”

His last show included one of his most known works titled “The Great Tortilla Conspiracy” which featured the face of Emma Gonzalez.

The concept behind “The Great Tortilla Conspiracy” is that it brings “the gospel of tortilla art” to the masses.

People took to social media to remember René and all that he contributed to the art scene, social justice movements and to their lives.

According to an interview in Mission Local, René was born in Tijuana and migrated with his family to San Diego.

René’s family has requested that SOMArts establish a memorial fund in his honor. All proceeds from this fund will be dedicated entirely to continuing René’s legacy of hospitality, beauty and creativity in SOMArts’ garden. Help us honor René by contributing to the memorial fund. We were truly blessed to work with such an incredible mentor, artist and friend for so many years. SOMArts will host a community memorial for René in the coming weeks.

Rene’s coworker at the Somarts Cultural Center said: “You bless all you know and meet by sharing your talents and humor.”

I had the privilege of working with Rene Yanez for over 16 years at SomArts Cultural Center. I miss sharing an office…

Posted by Mary Molly Mullaney on Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Rene was also a military veteran having served in a medical unit during the Vietnam War.

René is remembered as “El Padrino de la Mison.”

Grammy nominated emcee, DJ, actor, Wonway said that Rene inspired him.

“Que viva René Yáñez!”

Alicia Cruz, has worked with Rene for several years for the Day of the Dead exhibition and said that he took a chance on her and her altar vision.

 “He nurtured my evolution as an artist.”

Instagram/@mexichicastyle

“He was a gentle soul, very personable, lots of humor, he was a guide,” Cruz described Rene.

She says he also inspired her activism.

“He was my social media,” Cruz said. “He would tell me when there would be a march and say ‘you should join us.'”

Adding that “He’s the glue, he’s the heart of the SOMarts.”

An altar has been placed in front of the SOMArts Cultural Center in his honor.

Courtesy of Alicia Cruz

René was once asked what advice he would give to young artist, which he responded with: “Do what you like and be passionate about it, because you can’t be mediocre and be successful at it. Try to be as diverse in your skills, from computers, theater, performance, set design — all different aspects — because if you can’t get one thing, something else will come out.”


READ: This New Exhibit Shows The Incredible Evolution Of Lowrider Culture

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Video Shows Massive 139-Year-Old Victorian House Moved Entirely In One Piece Through San Francisco Streets

Things That Matter

Video Shows Massive 139-Year-Old Victorian House Moved Entirely In One Piece Through San Francisco Streets

Sometimes, home isn’t just where the heart is, it’s where you pack it up and move it. San Francisco resident Tim Brown seems to know this truth after buying a home in 2013 and moving it to a new location.

The 139-year-old Victorian house was moved in one piece through the streets of San Francisco to a new location.

The 5,170-square-foot house was relocated from its original address at 807 Franklin St. to 635 Fulton St., just a few blocks away.

Brown bought the home in 2013 with plans to repair it after it fell into disrepair. According to Hoodline, the house has six bedrooms and three baths and “will be relocated to 635 Fulton Street, where an existing building, which housed Bryant Mortuary for nearly 60 years, has already been moved to the eastern side of the 10,415-square-foot site to make room for it. The move is currently slated to occur on February 21, barring any rain delays.”

The house will be combined and turned into a 17-unit apartment building according to a report by SF Gate. A 47-unit apartment complex will be built in the house’s previous lot.

According to users on Twitter, the house’s move became somewhat of a parade as onlookers came out to watch a truck slowly move the historic house.

“It’s the most excitement I’ve had in 10 years. What if it topples?” Camilla Blomqvist said in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle.

According to Phil Joy, a veteran house mover, the house’s quarter-mile move took several years to plan.

According to Joy, the move was particularly difficult because the house was 80 feet in length and part of the path required going downhill.

“We had to get 15 different city agencies to agree to this,” Joy explained about the house which cost Brown nearly $400,000 in moving costs and fees.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Bad Bunny Makes History Yet Again As He Becomes The First Latino Urbano Artist On Cover Of ‘Rolling Stone’

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Makes History Yet Again As He Becomes The First Latino Urbano Artist On Cover Of ‘Rolling Stone’

I know I’ve said it before but I’ll say it again – Bad Bunny is making 2020 suck so much less, despite a global pandemic. He’s released two chart-topping albums (one of them a total surprise!) over the span of three months, he hosted a three-hour long Instagram live where he hinted at new music, he’s performed on Saturday Night Live and The Tonight Show – he’s basically been everywhere and I’m not complaining. Not. At. All.

And now, he’s making history yet again. This time on the cover of Rolling Stone.

Bad Bunny has become the first Latino Urbano artist on the cover of the famed magazine. I know, crazy right?!

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

Benito shot the Rolling Stone interview with his partner, Gabriela, and had an interview with the magazine’s Latin music editor via Zoom. He started off his chat addressing the pandemic: “The fucking coronavirus arrived, and it sealed me up,” he says in Spanish, deadpanning like a sullen teen banished to his room for the summer. “People think I’m spending quarantine in a huge mansion, with a really awesome pool…”

Also, real quick – can we just take a moment to admire the beauty that graced this cover…

I mean I’ve always had a crush on El Conejo Malo, but the boy is looking mighty fine in the last few months. Like you’ve seen his Instagram photoshoot right?

And Bad Bunny himself is so grateful and proud!

Bad Bunny only emerged four years ago, but he’s already become iconic.

“The little boy from Vega Baja, Puerto Rico, the little naive boy that worked at the supermarket, the son of Tito and Lysaurie, that’s the same guy on the cover of Rolling Stone,” Bad Bunny wrote on his Instagram in Spanish. “Nobody, nobody, nobody, nobody but nobody, can ever tell me what I can or cannot do.”

The Bad Bunny Rolling Stone cover also made history for who produced and created it – two Latinas!

As the writer Suzy Exposito explained on Twitter, she’s the first Latina to write a Rolling Stone cover story, Benito’s girlfriend Gabriela Berlingeri is the first Latina to shoot the cover image, and Alex Douglas-Barrera transcribed and translated the interview.

“THIS COVER WAS BROUGHT TO YOU BY LATINAS,” Exposito tweeted.

Catriona Ni Aolain, Rolling Stone’s director of creative content, said they tapped Berlingeri for help to shoot the magazine cover despite not being a professional photographer due to the coronavirus pandemic. Berlingery shot all the photos documenting our beloved Bad Bunny’s days in quarantine using an iPhone and everything was shot at an Airbnb in Puerto Rico, where the couple have been living.

“It wasn’t planned. It was very random,” Berlingeri told Rolling Stone.”I thought obviously that it was going to be a very cool photoshoot but it’s difficult for me to accept that is going to be the cover for Rolling Stone.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com