Things That Matter

César Chávez Changed The Way Our Country Treats Immigrant Farm Workers But There’s Still A Lot Of Work To Be Done

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If you are a Latino living in the United States, you’ve probably heard the name César Chávez. He was one of the first freedom fighters that advocated for the rights of farm workers, many of which had Mexican heritage. César Chávez is an icon of Chicano identity and still a source of inspiration for civil rights advocates and for those who use reason to fight injustice. 

Here are 21 facts about one of the most amazing Latino community leaders of all time.

He was born in Yuma, Arizona.

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His full birth name is César Estrada Chávez (yes, he took on his mom’s last name) and he was born on March 31, 1927. 

He had five siblings and grew up in an adobe house.

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César Chávez knew what it was to live precariously from a very early age. His family owned a ranch, but they lost the land during the Great Depression. They also lost the family home and so.

His parents moved the family from Arizona to California in search of work like many families.

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César Chávez’s parents, Juana Estrada and Librado Chávez were forced to move to California, where they became migrant farm workers. They faced many tribulations picking peas, lettuce, cherries, grapes, and beans. 

César Chávez became a farm worker, and thus his life as an activist began.

When he was a teenager he found the great solidarity that he showed for his whole life. He and is sister volunteered to drive fellow farmers to the doctor when they needed to be looked after. He soon discovered that things are better achieved when community members help each other. 

He dropped out of school in seventh grade.

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Young César Chávez couldn’t go to school while his mother worked the fields, so he left his formal education and became a full-time farmer.

He worked on farms until he joined the United States Navy in 1942.

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The experience was quite negative. César Chávez had hoped to translate the skills he learned in the military to his civil life. He served for two years only during World War II.

1952: an activist and pop culture star was born.

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César Chávez worked en el campo non-stop until 1952 when he became an organizer for the Community Service Organization, a group that looked after Latino rights. In this role he met Fred Ross, an experienced community organizer and the rest, as they say, is history. He urged voters to work and protested industry malpractices.

He founded the National Farm Workers Association with Dolores Huerta.

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Just 10 years after starting his activist efforts, César Chávez founded the NFWA with fellow Mexican-American activist Dolores Huerta. This dynamic duo revolutionized farmers’ conditions in the United States and started an era of non-violent protest against powerful corporations and government wrongdoings.

With Dolores Huerta by his side, he led a historic strike in the grape industry.

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The year was 1965 and the conditions were ripe for a great leap in the workers’ rights movement. With Huerta, César Chávez organized a consumer boycott against Californian grapes until labor conditions were improved for grape pickers. The strike made the national headlines and even Robert F. Kennedy supported the movement.

In 1966 the lucha expanded to Texas and farm owners were terrified.

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César Chávez is mostly known for his activism in California, but his legacy has impacted the whole country. In 1966 similar movements started in Texas and the Midwest, where César Chávez’s legacy led to the formation of unions such as Obreros Unidos in Wisconsin and the Farm Labor Organizing Committee in Ohio.

César Chávez and United Farm Workers organized the largest strike in U.S. history with results.

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Known as the Salad Bowl Strike, it happened in the early 1970s and consisted in a series of strikes and boycotts demanding higher wages for grape and lettuce workers. In order to support the strike, César Chávez fasted as a form of non-violent demonstration.

He was influenced by Mahatma Gandhi.

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After that, César Chávez used fasting as a form of protest. He fasted, for example, when Arizona prohibited boycotts and strikes by farm workers. He was inspired by Catholic doctrine and by the non-violent forms of resistance made popular by Gandhi when resisting British rule in India.

He was a family man.

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When he returned from his service in the military he married his high school novia, Helen Fabela. They moved to San Jose and had eight children.

He was a vegan.

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Long before the vegan movement gathered full force, he was a vegan, both because he fought for animal rights and because he had some health issues.

He was proud to be a Roman Catholic.

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It is not common for leftist activists to follow a religion, but César Chávez was a devout Catholic. He felt that the doctrine echoed his own sense of social justice, similar to what some Liberation Theology priests in Latin America have advocated for.

He was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize on three occasions.

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Even though he didn’t get the accolade, the American Friends Service Committee put forward his nomination three times. The prize would have been la cereza en el pastel, but to be honest, his legacy doesn’t really need it.

He has been a part of the California Hall of Fame since 2006.

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Thirteen years after his death then-governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and the First Lady Maria Shriver hicieron los honores.

He was awarded a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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Then-president Bill Clinton presented the coveted award on September 8, 1994. César Chávez’s partner in crime, Dolores Huerta, got hers from Barack Obama. 

César Chávez Day is a state holiday in California.

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Mark your calendars: March 31. It is not a federal holiday, but Barack Obama urged Americans to “observe this day with appropriate service, community, and educational programs to honor César Chávez’s enduring legacy.”

There are numerous schools, libraries, and parks named after him.

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Most of them are in California but don’t be surprised if you find one in your hometown.

He died on April 23, 1993, pero la lucha sigue!

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He died of natural causes at the house of his friend and fellow farm worker Dofia Maria Hau. He is buried at the National Chavez Center in Kern County, California, the epicenter of his now legendary struggle to reach fair conditions for the many heroes working the land.

READ: Rep. Gohmert Has Filed A Resolution To Change Cesar Chavez Day To ‘National Border Control Day’

Foundation Used To Only Have Three Colors, Here’s How We Went From Nudes To Fenty

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Foundation Used To Only Have Three Colors, Here’s How We Went From Nudes To Fenty

@bareminerals

Ah, foundation. Literally the basic building block for most of our beauty routines. It’s been around literally since the early ages and continues to thrive and impact the ways in which beauty brands develop their own platforms. But foundation wasn’t always as inclusive and complex as it used to be While it’s not uncommon to find foundation in it is starkest  blanket shades, literally dubbed light, medium, and dark, beauty brands like Fenty, Estée Lauder and Maybelline New York have all pushed for foundation hues that complement the broad spectrum of skin tones. But how did we make such progress in beauty? And where did foundation originally come from? 

Here’s a brief and insightful look at how foundation became another household item that we cannot live without.

In the beginning, foundation was only for the rich and powerful.

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Believe it or not, makeup goes back all the way to Biblical days where it was referred to as “face painting.” Just check out the Old Testament (Ezekiel 23:40). It was also used by rich Romans and Greeks during 200 B.C. However, the practice of using makeup for spectacle purpose could be seen more prominently in the 17th-century by monarchs such as Queen Elizabeth I and in the 18th-century men began to wear it too as made fashionable by Louis XV. Back then, this group of elites would wear foundation while artists painted their portraits as part of s social affairs, and actors would then go onto wear their looks onstage. While the foundation was only worn by the wealthy, the makeup itself was made out of toxic ingredients including zinc oxide, glycerin and calamine lotion.

Foundation, as we know it today, has its roots in Germany and Poland.

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Originally, German actor Carl Baudin created greasepaint to use as a tool to use on stage so his wig line would be hidden onstage. The greasepaint was made out of zinc white, ochre, and vermillion in lard. Weird, right? But it worked and he began to sell it. Then in 1914, Polish makeup icon Max Factor created his own formula that was a mix of pigment and lard and invented. Factor created the makeup specifically for actors in Hollywood and it worked so well on film that the product became a hot commodity. The Hollywood industry only used Max Factor foundations on sets. The term people used for the foundation was called pan-cake because of the density of the product but also it wasn’t only in liquid form but packed powder. 

The evolution of foundation in the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s

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For the most part, foundation just came in three shades, white, medium, and dark, which didn’t leave much room for those of us with a skin tone that didn’t fall into any of those three tones. While cosmetic companies began to manufacture their own foundation, for the average woman the main brands were Maybelline and Cover Girl. Both those brands sold compact powder cases that provided inexpensive coverage that provided coverage for faces. 

Loose powder foundation. Finally a breakthrough!

 Credit: Instagram/@bareminerals

As foundation continues to evolve, we now have foundation that comes in all forms including loose powder. While liquid provides extensive coverage that basically gets applied just like paint, for women who want a natural look can easily turn to loose powder for that flawless look. In the late ’90s Leslie Blodgett, a makeup executive at Bare Escentuals, changed the foundation game when her company created Bare Minerals, released a loose powder foundation that had SPF and other vital minerals for your face. Now every cosmetic company sells their own version of loose foundation powder. 

Foundation for everyone.

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Foundation has come a long way. It’s not the pan-cake makeup of yesteryear, nor is it made just for the rich and famous. It comes in a variety forms, including liquid, matte, powder, sticks, and so much more. The great thing about this evolving makeup is that it comes in all tones and for all skin types, and it’s no longer made with harmful ingredients. Today, cosmetic companies have found ways to create a product that not only provides coverage but that can also help your skin. There’s a huge portion of the beauty industry that sells products that are vegan, animal-cruelty free and made of organic ingredients. Imagine if Max Factor knew how foundation was made today, he’d probably think you were joking and argue that foundation could not be made without the use of animal lard. The reality is that today trying to choosing which foundation might have become a bit more complex since he started making foundation but as a result, mostly everyone is able to find a brand that works for their skin tone,  beauty standards, and wallet. 

READ: 25 Brands Made For Latinas And Women Of Color That Are Totally Crushing The Beauty Game

Aristemo Will Soon Be Broadcast All Over The US Thanks To Univision Distributing This Gay Love Story

Entertainment

Aristemo Will Soon Be Broadcast All Over The US Thanks To Univision Distributing This Gay Love Story

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Telenovelas have long been typecasting all the stereotypes we’ve grown up to believe to be true, and then to unlearn all over again. We’ve met the seductress duplicitous female villain, the overreactive, drama queen female ‘lover,’ and the steel-jawed masculine heart-breaker hero who finally finds his integrity and reunites with his inhumanly patient lover. Oh, and all the woman are highly sexualized and overall just the most feminine. Telenovelas have long codified the binary and the love stories of heteros. Not anymore.

Televisa’s El corazón nunca se equivoca (ECNSE) premiered in Mexico earlier this summer, and, now that Univision is picking up the novela, the U.S. is about to get its first-ever gay couple to star in a novela. 

El corazón nunca se equivoca (ECNSE) is the spin-off of novela Mi marido tiene familia that we’ve all been waiting for. 

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We got to meet stars Aristóteles “Aris” Córcega (Emilio Osorio) and Cuauhtémoc “Temo” López (Joaquín Bondoni) meet and fall in love in Mi marido tiene familia. That said, they met as teenagers while living under their parents’ ignorant roofs. Now we get to see them build their own lives. Together, the duo has been lovingly dubbed “Aristemo” or “Emiliaco,” depending who you ask.

In Mi marido tiene familia, we watched Aristemo endure a lot of homophobic hate.

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Being gay in a homophobic society is incredibly isolating and dangerous. Suicide rates are nearly twice as high in the LGBTQ+ community than in the hetero community. That’s not because they’re gay. It’s because people are told that “God hates fags.” Fans have been rooting for Aristemo ever since they graced the television screen because they offer hope to all the gay niños out there watching.

ECNSE will follow Aristemo as they move from Oaxaca to Mexico City to follow their passions.

Credit: @Dacaflow / Twitter

Of course, passion ensues. They escape Oaxaca’s brand of homophobia for Mexico City’s brand, but, as is the reality for our LGBTQ+ community, Aristemo finds and cultivates a safe space for them to love each other freely. Instead of sneaking around their parent’s houses, they hide away in their own shared apartment together, free at last.

Claro, leaving the crime scene of their families’ homophobia doesn’t heal those wounds as quickly as they hoped for.

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You can expect to see a reasonable representation of life for LGBTQ+ youth in Mexico City. LGBT youth are far more likely to experience depression, suicidality and mental illness than hetero folks. Instead of the “happily ever after” ending we typically get from novelas, we get to see a more realistic next chapter in Aristemo’s lives together as they cope with their own depression, suicidal thoughts, and the emotional distress that homophobic political campaigns inflict. 

American fans are emocionada AF.

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This fan took the time to screenshot grabs of an interview with Bondoni and Osorio, because the duo is just as cute off-screen as they are on-screen. “Ay pero bro, que bonito lo miras,” the fan captioned. “EMILIACO EN USA!”

We’re all learning lessons in love from Aristemo.

Credit: @SHIPPERARI / Twitter

Apparently, Aristemo not only goes on to create a safe space for themselves, but they also take in other LGBTQ+ youth. 😭We’ll meet their new friends, Diego (Nikolás Caballero) and Carlota Cervantes (Ale Müller), and watch how this little family learns to take care of each other and unlearn the drama that their families created for them.

The broader Aristemo family diaspora is currently weeping pride tears everywhere.

Credit: @pride_site / Twitter

“I’m so proud and also very excited 🙂 can’t wait for aristemo to make history in the us,” tweets one fan. “Creo que sin importar lo que pase, nos sentimos muy orgullosos,” tweets another. No novela drama we’re about to witness will change how proud we are to finally give this love story the spotlight. Why? Because the heart is never wrong [cries in gay].

America, you can watch El corazón nunca se equivoca on August 13, 2019 at 9p.m., only on Univision.

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It’s prep time, mi gente. Gather your friends, your micheladas and a few Costco sized bags of Fritos, because the emotional eating is about to take over your life. Plus, know that you have 26 episodes to binge, which in novela world, is simply not enough. Still, we’ll take it. Mil gracias, Univision.

READ: Univision Makes History, Announces First Telenovela That Will Star Gay Couple In Leading Role

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