Entertainment

Cafe Tacvba Greets Refugee Caravan In Mexico City With Support And Music

Cafe Tacvba proves once again why they are so beloved in Mexico, in the U.S. and around the world. Their compassionate spirit is evident in their music and their actions. Less than a week after they were at the Las Lunas del Auditorio award show in Mexico, both as performers and winners, Cafe Tacvba took time to motivate, encourage, and inspire others.

Members of Cafe Tacvba met the refugee caravan in Mexico City to provide support and music.

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Singer Rubén Albarrán and musician Emmanuel del Real met the asylum seekers, who were in Mexico City, at the Magdalena Mixhuca Sports City arena, to greet them and bring awareness to their needs.

Albarrán and del Real treated people from the caravan with acoustic performances.

Albarrán told reporters that he wanted to use their name as a band to bring awareness to the people traveling and to welcome them as they’ve been walking for so long.

“We want to wish them well, and to take care of them, protect them, and make sure they get to the destination they have chose to go to,” Albarrán said in Spanish.

“We’re also hoping people open their hearts to them, and cheer them in their journey,” he said. Albarrán added that “there’s so much ignorance, and it’s important that we don’t criminalize them, or discriminate against them because we are all immigrants. There is no human being that is illegal. We have to remember that this could be us. You never know when we will need help to walk somewhere else, and leave behind a life with family and possessions. These people have suffered immensely.”

Albarrán also burned sage and asked for the asylum seeker’s protection.

As he burned the sage he asked that the caravan would arrive to their destination safely, and also wished for all the kids to be safe and happy.

“I hope they eat healthy and not too much sugar,” he said. “Not junk food, but healthier foods.”

Here’s another cool performance from the duo.

As the asylum seekers continue their march closer to the border, troops have already arrived in San Diego and in Arizona.

Albarrán took time to hear from the people and pose for pictures.

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Albarrán’s humanization of the asylum seekers comes at time when the U.S. government continues to demonize the people seeking refuge from violence.


READ: Fans Can’t Get Enough Of This Cafe Tacvba’s NPR Tiny Desk Performance And For Good Reason

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The Principal Of A Florida School Was Captured Spanking An Undocumented Six-Year-Old Student With A Paddle

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The Principal Of A Florida School Was Captured Spanking An Undocumented Six-Year-Old Student With A Paddle

Corporal punishment includes all sorts of cruel physical acts. They range from spanking, slapping, force-feeding, and pinching to pulling, twisting, and striking with an object. The act of corporal punishment has long been criticized for its part in causing greater damage than intended.

Though the effects might bring around immediate compliance, researchers have underlined that such changes in behavior are often only short-term and can increase aggressive behavior. Perhaps this is why the act has varying legal statuses across the country.

Elementary school principal Melissa Carter is learning her own lesson from corporal punishment, but not as the receiver.

The elementary school principal from Florida is being investigated by local authorities after her use of corporal punishment on a 6-year-old student was captured on camera.

Principal Melissa Carter and school clerk Cecilia Self used a paddle on the student last month as punishment for damaging a computer screen. According to local CBS affiliate WINK News, corporal punishment was performed on the child in front of their mother. The mother used her cell phone to record the paddling in a clip that has gone viral.

According to WINK News, a female employee from the school contacted the child’s mother on April 13 after her daughter allegedly damaged a computer.

The mother of the child, who speaks Spanish and not fluent English, said that she was confused by the allegations made against her daughter during the phone call. During the conversation the school employee had mentioned “paddling” but the mother didn’t understand what that meant because of her language barrier.

She had been under the impression that she had been brought to the school to pay a $50 fine. Instead, she was taken to Principal Carter’s office where her daughter and the principal were waiting.

Carter soon brought out a wooden paddle and smacked the six-year-old on the backside. The video recorded by the mothers shows the little girl crying in pain during the attack.   

The mother claimed she resisted intervening because she feared having her immigration status brought into question.

“Nobody would have believed me. I sacrificed my daughter, so all parents can realize what’s happening in this school,” told the local news about the incident. “The hatred with which she hit my daughter, I mean it was a hatred that, really I’ve never hit my daughter like she hit her. I had never hit her.”

Bret Provinsky, the mother’s attorney, said the State Attorney’s Office is currently reviewing the case to see whether they will pursue criminal charges against Carter and Cecilia Self.

Self was meant to translate for the mother, but the mother said she did not do so. “That’s aggravated battery. They’re using a weapon that can cause severe physical harm,” said Provinsky. “The child is terrified, she feels vulnerable. There’s nothing she can do in the hands of these adults, who treated her so brutally, savagely, sadistically.”

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Police In Tulum Killed A Refugee By Kneeling On Her Neck And Mexicans Want Justice

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Police In Tulum Killed A Refugee By Kneeling On Her Neck And Mexicans Want Justice

So many of those attempting to reach the United States – or even Mexico in some cases – are already fleeing extreme violence, poverty, and fear. Refugees from Honduras and El Salvador (among other countries) are hoping to find a better life faraway from the corruption and danger that they face in their home countries.

But what happens when those same people fleeing violence in their home countries are met with state-sponsored violence on their journey to a better life? Unfortunately, at least one refugee, 36-year-old Victoria Esperanza Salazar, a mother of two teenage daughters, has lost her life while hoping for a better one.

Four police officers are in custody after the killing of a woman from El Salvador.

Four municipal police officers are in custody and under investigation for murder following the death of a Salvadoran woman who was violently pinned to the ground while she was being arrested in Tulum.

Video footage shows a female officer with her knee on the back of 36-year-old Victoria Esperanza Salazar, a mother of two teenage daughters who was living in Tulum on a humanitarian visa.

In the footage, Victoria, who was apparently arrested for disturbing the peace, can be heard moaning in pain and is seen writhing on the road next to a police vehicle as she was held down for more than 20 seconds. Three male police are also present, one of whom appears to help the female offer restrain Victoria. Footage then shows officers drag her limp body into the back of a police truck.

Many are comparing Victoria’s murder to that of George Floyd.

Many in Mexico are comparing Victoria’s death to the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis last summer, who also died pinned under an officer’s knee. Video shared on social media shows a police officer leaning on Salazar’s head and neck and she cries out, and then goes limp. Officers then drag her body into the back of a police truck.

Mexican officials have largely condemned the officers’ actions and the Attorney General said that the officers — three men and one woman — will be charged with femicide. The charge of femicide carries a penalty of no less than 40 years in prison. The police actions violated the national law on the use of force, the Attorney General’s Office said. 

Victoria’s death comes as millions of Mexican women demand that the authorities do more to combat gender violence in Mexico, where an average of 11 women are killed every day. Her alleged murder also occurred as Mexican authorities ramp up enforcement against mainly Central American migrants traveling through Mexico to seek asylum in the United States.

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