Things That Matter

Tens Of Thousands Of Puerto Ricans, Including Bad Bunny And Ricky Martin, Call For The Resignation Of Gov. Rosselló At Massive Old San Juan Protest

On Wednesday, tens of thousands of Puerto Ricans shouted “Ricky, renuncia!” as they marched through the streets of Old San Juan in its fifth and largest protest calling for the resignation of Gov. Ricardo Rosselló.

Early in the demonstration, Puerto Rican stars like Bad Bunny, Residente, Ricky Martin, PJ Sin Suela and more gathered in front of the Capitolio, where they held large Puerto Rican flags and signs that read “los enterraron sin saber que somos semillas,” and encouraged a roaring crowd to not abandon their fight. As the artists stood atop a white truck in the midst of protestors, activist Tito Kayak, who famously placed the Puerto Rican flag on the Statue of Liberty’s crown in 2000 in protest of the US’ presence in Vieques, scaled the flagpole in an attempt to remove the American flag. The crowd erupted in cheers, chanting “Tito, Tito,” showing that the protest in the US territory extends beyond the people’s grievances with their local government.

Bad Bunny took to the streets of Puerto Rico with his fellow Americans to protest a governor they want out of office.

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

Protests erupted on Saturday after Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism published 889 pages of a private Telegram chat between the governor and some of his officials. The messages included profanity-laced homophobic, transphobic and misogynistic comments about female politicians, celebrities and protestors and hard-hearted jokes about the victims of Hurricane María. For the people of Puerto Rico, who were just rocked by a money-laundering scheme by its education and health leaders and endured repeated neglect and abuse by both its local and federal governments following the devastating hurricane, the chats symbolized the final straw.

As darkness fell on Wednesday, some of the celebrities spoke out.

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

“This government has to begin respecting the people. We can’t stop protesting,” Residente, born René Pérez Joglar, said. Later, Puerto Rican singer iLe, Residente’s younger sister, sang the original, revolutionary version of La Borinqueña, with demonstrators, holding their flags and fists in the air, joining her in song, belting, “Vámonos, borinqueños, vámonos ya, que nos espera ansiosa, ansiosa la libertad.”

By la Fortaleza, the governor’s mansion, tension sparked in the mostly-peaceful protest in the late hours of the night. Demonstrators, some throwing bottles of water and fireworks, busted through a barricade. Police fired tear gas, dispersing the massive crowd and angering local residents who allege officers discharged on empty streets where elders and youth in their homes struggled to breathe as a result of the smoke.

Other areas of the old city looked like a war zone, with officers chasing and shooting rubber bullets at protestors, trash bags blazing on cobblestone streets and the windows of graffiti-laden establishments shattering.

According to authorities, at least seven protesters were arrested during the protests and four police officers were injured. There is also an investigation into an officer who forcefully grabbed a demonstrator alleging she was trying to jump over a barrier, though footage of the incident later revealed she was not.

Motorcycles also thundered through the city early Thursday morning, as a protest caravan of thousands of motorcyclists, led by El Rey Charlie and reggaetoneros Brytiago, Noriel, and Ñengo Flow, traveled from Trujilo Alto to Old San Juan in a journey that captivated the island.

People on the island are relentless in demanding that their voices be heard.

Credit: elreycharlie / Instagram

“We won’t stop. The oppression is over. The repression is over. Ricky, resign or we will take you out because the people put you there and we are ready to remove you. We want you out,” El Rey Charlie, a beloved motorist on the island, told Puerto Rican network WAPA-TV.

Outside of San Juan, groups around the island also took to the streets. In the States, the diaspora and their allies similarly demonstrated in Orlando, New York, Miami, Boston, Cleveland, San Antonio and more, while international actions occurred in the Dominican Republic and Spain as well.

Despite the massive uprising, Rosselló has contended that he would not resign. The governor, who previously apologized for his “improper act,” said that he believes he could win over the people of Puerto Rico.

“I recognize the challenge that I have before me because of the recent controversies, but I firmly believe that it is possible to restore confidence and that we will be able, after this painful process, to achieve reconciliation,” he said in Spanish. “I have the commitment, stronger than ever, to carry out the public policy.”

The governor is desperately trying to get people to forget about the unacceptable and offensive conversations he was involved.

Credit: @ricardorossello / Twitter

As Rosselló insists he would not step down, the president of Puerto Rico’s House of Representatives, Carlos Méndez Núñez, has already appointed three lawyers to investigate the contents of the leaked chats to determine whether an impeachment process can begin.

Additionally, Puerto Rico’s non-voting delegate to Congress Rep. Jenniffer González-Colón, who is a member of the governor’s pro-statehood New Progressive Party, has called for a meeting among her PNP colleagues.

There is no shortage of corruption that people want to get rid of right now.

Credit: @Jenniffer2012 / Twitter

“There must be an urgent meeting of the directory of @pnp_pr to discuss everything that is happening,” González-Colón said on Twitter.

President Donald Trump also took the opportunity to lambast the embattled governor as well as criticize the island, including the mayor of San Juan Carmen Yulín Cruz, for corruption.

President Trump weighed in on the matter and used it to attack an island still recovering from the hurricane and the mayor of San Juan.

Credit: @realDonaldTrump / Twitter

He continued: “This is more than twice the amount given to Texas & Florida combined. I know the people of Puerto Rico well, and they are great. But much of their leadership is corrupt, & robbing the U.S. Government blind!”

But for many protesters, the marches aren’t just about sending a message of indignation to Rosselló, but rather to all corrupt politicians on the archipelago as well as the colonial federal government. Protest posters illustrate Rosselló with Trump’s hair to compare the two abhorred leaders, while vandalism on concrete walls screams for the resignation of the governor, the fiscal control board and the island’s colonial ties to the U.S.

Today and tomorrow, the people say, the uprising continues, with demonstrations planned across Puerto Rico and its diaspora in the US and worldwide.

Read: Here’s What You Need To Know About The Puerto Rico Uprising

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Music Videos You Need To Watch This Week: Jay Wheeler, Sofi De La Torre and More

Latidomusic

Music Videos You Need To Watch This Week: Jay Wheeler, Sofi De La Torre and More

Welcome to The Watch List, where we round up the best Latin music videos released in the past week that you need in your life. Check out the list below.

Jay Wheeler – “Viendo al Techo”

The “Curiosidad” singer is back and this time around with a solo effort for “Viendo al Techo.” The romantic reggaeton track follows a couple in the music video and Jay is singing from rooftops (and even inside their room).

Sofi de la Torre – “Y duele” feat. Pablo Alborán

Spanish singers Sofi de la Torre and Pablo Alborán teamed up for “Y Duele,” a pop duet that has them playing lovers driving around a minivan for the music video.

Carin León – “Mal Necesario”

En las malas y en las buenas, your partner should always be there, and Carin León sings about that in the music video for the Regional Mexican hit “Mal Necesario.”

Daniel Sabater – “tenemos que quedar” feat. DJ Parriba

Get your alternative pop fix with Daniel Sabater’s ‘tenemos que quedar‘ EP and music video, which is reminiscent of a Wes Anderson movie color palette.

Valentino x Jowell & Randy – “Suelta”

Reggaeton OG’S Valentino and Jowell & Randy (and their dancers) take you on stage with throwback beat fueled “Suelta.”

Rafa Pabon & Brray – “Domingo de Bote”

Summer is almost here, and Rafa Pabon and Brray set the mood for the boat and yacht parties with “Domingo de Bote.”

Carlos Vives & Ricky Martin – “Canción Bonita”

Watch Carlos Vives and Ricky Martin team up for their very first collaboration in a beautiful ode to Puerto Rico. Read more about the song and music video here.

READ: Latin Pop Icons Carlos Vives And Ricky Martin Team Up for Colorful “Canción Bonita” Video

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Latin Pop Icons Carlos Vives And Ricky Martin Team Up for Colorful “Canción Bonita” Video

Entertainment

Latin Pop Icons Carlos Vives And Ricky Martin Team Up for Colorful “Canción Bonita” Video

Two of the biggest stars in Latin music, Carlos Vives and Ricky Martin, have teamed up for “Canción Bonita.” Both icons retread their old stomping grounds in Puerto Rico for the music video.

This is Carlos and Ricky’s first time collaborating.

“Canción Bonita” is Vives’ first taste of new music this year. It’s also Martin’s first new song of the year. The Grammy and Latin Grammy winners joined forces for this feel-good song that blends the sounds from both their worlds. Puerto Rico is very much a part of Vives’ musical journey like his home country.

“I always wanted to return to San Juan, but to return this time with Ricky, to sing with him and declare our love for the island, it is a memory for a lifetime,” Vives said in a statement. “If you want to know why Puerto Rican artists are so charismatic and successful, walk through San Juan with us listening to ‘Canción Bonita.”’

A bit of vallenato from Vives’ Colombia meets the reggaeton-pop of Martin’s Puerto Rico in “Canción Bonita.” As the song’s title suggests, this collaboration lives up to its name with both superstars singing the most beautiful lyrics about the island. These Latin pop titans give a soaring performance that can carry their lovely message to the higher heavens.

The music video for “Canción Bonita” was shot in P.R.’s most iconic places.

“‘Canción Bonita’ is the perfect theme for this collaboration with my brother Carlos Vives,” said Martin. “Carlos’ love for Puerto Rico is genuine, and this gives you authentic value to the lyrics. A true celebration of our land that gives us so much.”

The “Canción Bonita” music video was shot in places like Old San Juan, Piñones, and El Matey bar. Vives and Martin bask in the beauty of the island. They will perform the song together at the Latin American Music Awards on Thursday night on Telemundo.

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Read: Ricky Martin Opens Up On Being A Queer Latino And Talks New Music In Powerful New Interview

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