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Anthony Borges Protected 20 Classmates During The Parkland Shooting And Just Got Released From The Hospital

More than 50 days since Anthony Borges was shot five times by Nikolas Cruz at his school in Parkland, Florida, the teen is finally home. The 15-year-old Venezuelan-American gave his first interview on the “Today” show, but only spoke a few words.

When asked how he felt, Borges softy said: “I feel good.”

The interview took place at Borges’ new home. The “Today” show reports that his family had to move out of their apartment because it wasn’t accessible to Anthony’s wheelchair. The family is now living in a one-story home.

“Today” interviewer, Kerry Sanders asked Borges if he felt lucky to be alive. Borges just responded by nodding yes. He also said that he truly thought he was going to die.

His family showed the hundreds of letters that Borges has received from complete strangers, many of which he has yet to read. His mother got emotional reading one of the letters that described Borges as a “fighter, winner, champion.”

Carlitos Rodriguez, one of Borges’ friends, was also interviewed on the “Today” show saying: “It shouldn’t have happened on Feb. 14. It shouldn’t have happened ever, not in my school or any other school.”

Borges visited his school for the first time since he was wounded.

Principal at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Ty Thompson tweeted: “Great to see Anthony back on campus: a true inspiration.”

His classmate, Emma González also tweeted: “We are so thankful and happy to know Anthony is safe and back at it at the eagle’s nest.”

Borges’ family is still going forward with their lawsuit against the county public schools.

“The failure of Broward County Public Schools, and of the Principal and School Resource Officer to adequately protect students, and in particular our client, from life-threatening harm were unreasonable, callous and negligent,” Alex Arreaza wrote in a notice of intent to sue.


READ: Anthony Borges Is Back In the ICU, A Day After His Family Said They Will Sue School and Police

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John Oliver Blasts U.S. Immigration Courts For Letting Toddlers Defend Themselves

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John Oliver Blasts U.S. Immigration Courts For Letting Toddlers Defend Themselves

How well did you know immigration law at three years old?

John Oliver had a segment on “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” this week discussing the growing problem in immigration courts. Oliver first points out that there are more than 684,000 backlogged cases heading to the almost 60 immigration courts across the country. That number represents a doubling of cases compared to 2009. In many cases, immigrants awaiting their day in an immigration court have to wait years. As Oliver points out, immigrants in Chicago, for example, can wait up to five years before they get their day in front of an immigration judge.

“So how did this system get so broken,” Oliver asks the audience. “Well, let’s start with the fact that a surge of immigration from Central America, ramped up immigration enforcement and a glacial rate of hiring judges have combined to create a truly massive backlog of cases.”

While that fact alone is troubling for the immigrant community, what is more startling is the fact that immigration courts are civil courts. This means that the federal government does not have to provide attorneys for people who can’t afford it. This rule also applies to young children.

“That’s just clearly ridiculous because you cannot let a two-year-old be unsupervised in court,” Oliver says. He adds: “While sending kids into court without representation might seem crazy to you, amazingly, some judges are apparently fine with it. When a lawsuit was filed arguing all kids need lawyers, Jack H. Weil, an assistant chief immigration judge suggested that’s not necessarily the case.”

Immigration Judge Jack H. Weil made headlines when he argued that he has taught young children immigration law.

“I’ve taught immigration law, literally, to three-year-olds and four-year-olds,” Judge Weil said in a deposition, according to Oliver. “It takes a lot of time. It takes a lot of patience. They get it. It’s not the most efficient, but it can be done.”

Immigration attorneys have fought back against Weil’s assertion showing their own toddler children answer immigration questions.

As you can tell from the above video, children as young as three and four years old are not able to understand immigration law. Let alone properly answer questions from an immigration judge about their place of birth, native language and where they’d be deported to.

Oliver goes on to further explain the discrepancy between deportation rates among different American cities with some cities having deportation rates close to 90 percent in Atlanta and some as low as 24 percent in New York.


READ: John Oliver Gave The Best Argument Against Trump’s Proposed Surge Border Patrol Hiring

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