Things That Matter

A Florida Family Might Lose The Father To Deportation And They Blame Obama For Ending ‘Wet Foot, Dry Foot’

Rudy Blanco came to the U.S. from Cuba when he was only 8 years old. According to the Tallahassee Democrat, Blanco left Cuba with his parents and sister on his grandfather’s shrimping boat in 1980 during the Mariel boat lift. They made it to Key West and lived with relatives in Miami until they could get on their feet. Now, 37 years, one marriage, and two adult children later, Blanco has been detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and it currently being held in a detention pod in Crawfordville, Fla. awaiting deportation back to Cuba.

The Tallahassee Democrat reports that Blanco’s detention is tied to a crime committed 20 years ago. In the ’90s, Blanco, who had a landscaping business, was busted for selling cocaine in Tavernier, Fla. The crime was downgraded and the adjudication was withheld and Blanco served his year on probation without incident. However, in 2005, an immigration judge ordered his deportation due to the cocaine possession, only to grant him a stay as long as he checked in with ICE. During his first check-in with ICE under the Trump administration, who Blanco and his wife both supported during November’s election, Blanco was detained.

“After full due process, Mr. Blanco received a Feb. 3, 2005, final order of removal from an immigration judge with the Executive Office for Immigration Review,” Tammy Spicer, a spokeswoman for ICE, told Tallahassee Democrat. “He was arrested May 9, 2017, by (ICE) and ICE intends to remove Mr. Blanco in compliance with the court’s order.”

According to Tallahassee Democrat, the Blancos had some worries about Trump’s immigration orders but ultimately thought that Trump’s stance would improve Blanco’s situation. They admit that they still support Trump and that they blame Obama for repealing the ‘wet foot, dry foot’ policy that allowed for Cuban refugees to stay in the U.S. without punishment. The reason ICE is now deporting Blanco back to Cuba is due to Trump’s immigration objectives, which make immigration enforcement much more strict and Obama’s reversal of the ‘wet foot, dry foot policy, which led to Cuba accepting deportees.

His family has created a GoFundMe page to help save Blanco from deportation.

You can read the full Tallahassee Democrat story by tapping here.

(VIA: Tallahassee Democrat)


READ: A Trump Voter Is Likely Losing Her Husband To Deportation

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Sheriff Calls Immigrants ‘Drunks’ Then Finds Out His Son Was Arrested For Public Intoxication

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Sheriff Calls Immigrants ‘Drunks’ Then Finds Out His Son Was Arrested For Public Intoxication

screenshot / youtube / fox news

A Texas sheriff is eating his words after his bigotted comments came back to bite him in the worst way.

A day after Tarrant County Sheriff Bill Waybourn referred to undocumented immigrants as “drunks” who would “run over” children, his own son was reportedly arrested on charges of public intoxication. It has also been revealed that his son Sergei Waybourn has been arrested before. In 2018 he was charged with assault and in recent years he was arrested for trespassing and theft.

Sheriff Waybourn’s comments sparked controversy when he spoke against undocumented immigrants at a press conference in Washington.

Last Thursday, the sheriff spoke at the conference alongside Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director Matthew Albence. Speaking in response to a ruling by a federal California judge made last month that imposed restrictions on ICE’s use of “detainers,” Waybourn underlined the consequences of releasing illegal immigrants with DWI and other crimes.

U.S. District Judge André Birotte Jr.’s decision barred ICE from using online database searches to find and detain people based. Recently, the ACLU stated that since 2008, 2 million US citizens have been illegally detained because of such searches.

Waybourn pointed to his charge of inmates to give examples of high rates of repeat offenders. “If we have to turn them loose or they get released, they’re coming back to your neighborhood and my neighborhood,” Waybourn said according to New York Post. “These drunks will run over your children, and they will run over my children.”

After his comments, the national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens called for Waybourn’s resignation.

According to Dallas Morning News, Domingo Garcia said Waybourn ought to “resign and apologize for his bigoted comments immediately.”

In response, Waybourne said his comments had been taken out of contexts and his office released a statement saying that “Sheriff Waybourn was not referring to all legal or illegal immigrants when making his comments about DWI/DWI repeat offenders. He was speaking toward the charges of DWI and DWI repeat offender in the context of illegal immigration.”

In response to the news of his son’s arrest, the sheriff said he is “deeply saddened by Sergei’s choices.”

According to WFAA, he said that “It has been many years since he disassociated from our family. We, along with many family members have made efforts over the years to help him – all to no avail. It is always sad when drugs take control of a person’s life. His choices and actions have lead to this situation.”

Ecuador Was In Chaos After Massive Protests But The Government Has Reached A Deal With These Indigenous Activists

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Ecuador Was In Chaos After Massive Protests But The Government Has Reached A Deal With These Indigenous Activists

@democracynow / Twitter

Ecuador’s government announced a round of talks with leaders of the Indigenous groups who have been mobilizing against the government in a move to end the violence and chaos that has racked the nation for more than a week.

President Moreno announced he would withdraw the country from a deal reached with the IMF that many said would cause the greatest harms to the country’s most vulnerable populations.

In a major address, President Lenin Moreno announced he had struck a deal with indigenous leaders to cancel a disputed austerity package.

The news comes after nearly two weeks of protests that have paralyzed the economy and left seven dead.

Under the new agreement, President Moreno will withdraw the International Monetary Fund-backed package, known as Decree 883, that included a sharp rise in fuel costs. Indigenous leaders, in turn, will call on their followers to end protests and street blockades.

“Comrades, this deal is a compromise on both sides,” Moreno said. “The indigenous mobilization will end and Decree 883 will be lifted.”

The two sides will work together to develop a package of measures to cut government spending, increase revenue and reduce Ecuador’s growing budget deficits and public debt.

Ecuador’s Indigenous groups celebrated the announcement as a major victory.

“I’m so happy I don’t know what to say. I don’t have words, I’m so emotional. At least God touched the president’s heart,” said protester Rosa Matango in an interview with The Guardian. “I am happy as a mother, happy for our future. We indigenous people fought and lost so many brothers, but we’ll keep going forward.”

Caravans of cars roamed the streets early on Monday honking in celebration, passengers shouting, banging pots and waving Ecuadorian flags.

“The moment of peace, of agreement, has come for Ecuador,” said Arnaud Peral, the United Nations’ resident coordinator in Ecuador and one of the mediators of the nationally televised talks. “This deal is an extraordinary step.”

Wearing the feathered headdress and face paint of the Achuar people of the Amazon rainforest, the president of the Confederation of Indigenous Nations, Jaime Vargas, thanked President Moreno and demanded improved long-term conditions for Indigenous Ecuadorians.

“We want peace for our brothers and sisters in this country,” Vargas said. “We don’t want more repression.”

The protests started when the President affirmed his support for an IMF-backed agreement, known as Decree 883.

The move sparked nationwide protests as prices rose overnight by about a 25% for gas and double for diesel. A state of emergency was imposed on Thursday. Truck and taxi drivers forced a partial shutdown of Quito’s airport and roadblocks have paralyzed major roads across the country.

Images from Quito showed protesters hurling gas bombs and stones, ransacking and vandalizing public buildings as well as clashing with the police in running battles late into the night.

Some protests became so violent that the government was actually forced to flee the capital of Quito for the coastal city of Guayaquil.

All of this was in response to Decree 883 which would have ended fuel subsidies that many of the country’s poorest citizens have come to rely on.

Other indigenous demands included higher taxes on the wealthy and the firing of the interior and defence ministers over their handling of the protests.

In a shift from the heated language of the last 10 days of protests, each side at the negotiations praised the other’s willingness to talk as they outlined their positions in the first hour before a short break.

“From our heart, we declare that we, the peoples and nations, have risen up in search of liberty,” Vargas told The Guardian. “We recognize the bravery of the men and women who rose up.”