Things That Matter

Another Sexist Man Has Mocked The Feminist Protest Movement Sweeping Latin America By Dressing Up As A Victim

For the past several years, women — mostly in Latin America — have been fighting for the rights of women. And not just for the rights of abortion and health care, but fighting literally for their lives. Femicide — violence against women — is a real and serious problem in this country. It points to the countless women that have died, been raped, and assaulted at the hands of men and nothing is done about it. What makes this matter even worse is that some men are stupid and senseless enough to make fun of it. 

On Dec. 16, a new college graduate thought it would be funny to mark this big occasion by dressing up as a victim of femicide. 

If you wanted proof about the “men are trash” movement, you need to look no further than Tomas Vidal who grated from the International Commerce at the 21st Century University in Argentina. This dumbass, and there is no other way to describe him, wore the signature green bandana that femicide victims wear and their supporters. His sign read, “the fault was not mine.” 

The school was not pleased with his actions. In fact, they were quite mad. 

“From the reproachable action during the celebration of the graduation of the student Tomás Vidal yesterday, the authorities of the 21st Century University have summoned him to notify him, that he has started immediately a summary that will establish the responsibilities and sanctions that correspond, depending on his behavior, contrary to the values that this institution promotes and represents, it will not allow any demonstration or behavior that threatens women, equal rights, peaceful coexistence between citizens and respect for differences.”

Furthermore, the school has him to resubmit his final assignment and to take a gender course before he leaves the university. 

People on social media were not pleased by his actions either. And they let him know exactly how they felt. 

One woman said that she not only blamed him for his dumb actions but those that enabled it to happen. “Tomás Vidal is NOT an isolated case. Behind this costume is a friend who created it, one who created it, one who laughed and one who saw and fell silent. One of the most fundamental elements of sexist violence is male complicity, and in this photo, we have its description.”

Another woman on Twitter wrote, “Can you imagine losing a sister, friend or daughter in a femicide and then see the publications of the tomboy Tomas Vidal mocking, does not happen for feminism or not, what kind of person can celebrate deaths of women impaled, raped, burned, dismembered?”

Yeah, we’d like to know how his mother feels about her son’s actions. 

Women around the country are saying “enough” to the violence against women and that “not one more” woman should be harmed. And it’s not a laughing matter.

According to a United Nations report last year, more than 50,000 women are killed by intimate partners or family members around the world. But there is some improvement going on, at least in Latin America and that’s in large part to the many protests about the issue. 

Angela Me, Chief of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), told NPR last year that in 18 “Latin American countries have established the criminal offense of femicide, the killing of a female because of her gender. This is a clear signal that this is not acceptable.

In addition, many countries have adopted laws, such as restraining orders, to help protect women from intimate partner violence. They are also providing training for police and prosecutors to heighten their awareness of these issues.”

Here’s another lesson for Tomas Vidal. Perhaps he should learn this dance and maybe his soul will be awakened with kindness and empathy. 

Something is clearly mentally wrong with Vidal for him to think it was okay and funny to make fun of a movement that is addressing a serious problem in the world. 

READ: The Murder of a Teen Mom By Her Boyfriend is Raising a Discussion Around the Prevalence of Femicide in Abusive Relationships

All Of The Documentaries Feminists Should Watch While In Quarantine

Entertainment

All Of The Documentaries Feminists Should Watch While In Quarantine

Netflix

Just because it might seem as if the world is on pause, it doesn’t mean that our efforts to learn more about it and better ourselves should be.

Documentaries alongside biographies can teach us so much about the world we live in and open our eyes to its complexities, even teaching us about the obstacles we did not know were right in front of us. As women of color, there are so many, and often times we use documentaries to learn about them, so we can better understand how to propel ourselves forward and continue to succeed. To make sure that you do too, we’re rounding up documentaries for you to learn, grow, and build hope from while in quarantine.

Check the documentaries we’re binging now that we’ve got the time below!

Becoming (2020)

Former First Lady Michelle Obama takes an intimate look at her life, relationships, and dreams in this documentary which sees her touring the country while promoting her book Becoming. The New York Times describes the film as showing “a familiar, albeit more carefree, former first lady.”

AKA Jane Roe (2020)

This documentary by Nick McSweeney highlights Norma McCorvey, the woman who made history as “Jane Roe” in the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case Roe vs. Wade. Beyond the shock value of the movie’s twist, which unearths the reasons why McCorvey ultimately turned her back on the movement that advocated for her right to choose, it tells a story about the ruthlessness of political agendas.

Abuelas: Grandmothers On A Mission (2013)

Three decades after Argentinean mothers created a movement demanding Argentinean officials to discover what happened with the sons and daughters who “disappeared” during Argentina’s Dirty War, the grandmothers continue their efforts in this documentary.

Chisholm ’72: Unbought & Unbossed (2004)

The historical documentary follows Brooklyn Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm during her campaign for the Democratic Party presidential nomination in 1972. It will serve as an impressive reminder of this Black woman’s might and the fight she managed to get us all passionate about.

Honeyland (2019)

This Oscar-nominated film is about a beekeeper in North Macedonia. Directed by Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov this documentary shows how the beekeeper’s life is affected when the ancient techniques she uses to farm bees are impacted by a new family who moves into the neighborhood and brings modern technology with them.

Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise (2016)

African- American poet Maya Angelou has her life depicted in the documentary that dives into her traumatic childhood and her life as a singer and dancer. The first feature documentary includes interviews with Oprah Winfrey, Hillary Clinton, and Common.

Knock Down The House (2019)

This documentary featuring Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the league of women who ran for Congress in 2018 including Cori Bush, Paula Jean Swearengin, and Amy Vilela made waves when it first debuted on Netflix. Just as it did for us, we imagine it will give you a whole heck of a lot of hope and pride in the woman who fight for our rights and country.

A Quick Explanation About What Is Happening In The Dominican Republic

Things That Matter

A Quick Explanation About What Is Happening In The Dominican Republic

josejhan / Instagram

Dominicans across the world are protesting in unison to demand transparency in the recent elections in the Dominican Republic. The protests stem from a recent municipal election that many are calling into question. Faulty voting machines and a lack of transparency have set off a warning call within the global Dominican community fearing election tampering and a power grab. Here’s what we know so far.

Dominicans are demanding answers about irregularities in the latest election on the island.

Four hours into the voting process, the Dominican government reported irregularities with the voting machines. According to officials, 60 percent of the voting machines were experiencing the same issue of showing voters incomplete ballots. Many showed just one party on the ballot. That’s when the government, in an unprecedented move, suspended the Feb. 16 elections.

People across the island have joined in taking to the streets to protest against the government’s decision to suspend the elections.

Tensions are flaring on the island about election tampering and voting after one party has ruled the presidency for 24 years. It is also three months until the general elections and Dominicans don’t trust the process after the latest snafu.

“The electronic vote failed us that morning,” Electoral Board Presiden Julio César Castaños Guzmán, said at a press conference.

Yet, Casatños Guzmán admitted that the Dominican government was warned that they knew of the issue before the elections began but were under the impression that they could be fixed when the machines were installed. The elections proved that the issue was not corrected.

Concerned Dominicans are desperately trying to shine a full light on what they consider an imminent dictatorship.

“The Dominican people are under a dictatorship disguised as democracy,” Alejandro Contreras, a protester in New York told NBC News. “We will be demanding the resignation of all the members of the electoral board, as well as a formal public explanation on the impunity and corruption within the government, among other issues.”

The protests and election fears come the same week as the Dominican Republic’s independence day.

On Feb. 27, 1844, the Dominican Independence War led to the imperial independence of the Dominican Republic from Haiti. The number of casualties from the war are unknown but Haiti is estimated to have lost three times more soldiers than the Dominican Republic.

The fears of a dictatorship are real on the island who was under a dictatorship for 31 years in the 20th century. Rafael Trujillo ruled the island with a brutal fist from February 1930 until his assassination in May 1961. He was president of the island for two terms covering 18 years from 1930 to 1938 and again from 1942 to 1952. After the last term, he ruled as an unelected military man keeping the island in fear.

All eyes are on the Dominican Republic and their government as Dominicans across the world fight to preserve its democracy.

Credit: @sixtalee / Twitter

Sigue luchando. El pueblo unido, jamas sera vencido. Viva la democracia.

READ: After A Year Of Bad Press, The Dominican Republic Launches Campaign To Bring Tourists Back