Things That Matter

100-Year-Old Church Closes Amid Fear of Immigration Raids

After 100 years of serving parishioners, the All Saints Church in Detroit has closed its doors. On Dec. 31 they held their last mass. Many factors are listed as to why the historic church had to close, including financial issues and a newly constructed highway nearby. However, some point the main cause to immigration raids.

A reverend at a nearby church says a rise in immigration raids impacted attendance, and Latinos stopped showing up.

“ICE (U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement) has an informal agreement that they have affirmed that they will not go into churches and not hassle people going to church,” Rev. Marc Gawronski, a pastor at the neighboring St. Gabriel church, told The Detroit Free Press, adding that despite that agreement, “people are even nervous about being able to get up in the morning and go to church.”

The Latino community has always been a huge part of Michigan’s history, dating back to the early 1900s. They’ve also created roots with the local Catholic churches. But now with increased raids many are not even leaving their homes.

The Detroit Free Press reports that only three people showed up to one of the last Spanish-language masses.

CREDIT: YouTube/US NEWS

In 2017, ICE conducted several raids throughout Michigan. Many of the raids have targeted Iraqi nationals, as well Mexicans and South Americans.

Last month, 27 undocumented immigrants were detained by ICE in raids conducted in Western Michigan.

“Operations like this one demonstrate ICE’s continued focus on the arrest of dangerous criminal aliens as well as those who enter the United States illegally,” Rebecca Adducci, field office director for Enforcement and Removal Operations in Detroit, said in a released statement. “I applaud the dedicated men and women of ICE who work tirelessly to keep our communities safe.”

Raids have increased immensely in the area since the election of President Donald Trump.

The ramp up in raids has caused many undocumented immigrants to stay indoors, and even away from sanctuary sites like churches. Some are even afraid to go to work.

In May, three Latino men were detained while working at an upscale restaurant in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

All detainees had no criminal background, but were taken because they couldn’t show proper documentation.

In a released statement on the detainments at Sava’s Restaurant, ICE said:

“While conducting a targeted enforcement action at Sava’s restaurant in Ann Arbor, Michigan, ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers encountered and arrested three individuals on immigration violations. Sergio Cardenas Rubio and Jesus Ortiz Hernandez unlawfully entered the United States without inspection at an unknown date and location. Mohamed Souman lawfully entered the country, but did not depart in accordance with the terms of his status. All three are currently in ICE custody.”

All Saints Church opened on Nov. 1, 1896. Only their soup kitchen that feeds hundreds of families will remain open.

“We knew the parishioners were low, and that could contribute to closure,”  Gabriela Bravo told the Detroit Free Press. “But in my case, I was surprised. I was hoping the Archdiocese would do something to save the church.”

People on Facebook had mixed reaction about the closing of the church.

CREDIT: Facebook

READ: A Guy In A Fake ICE Jacket Showed Up To A California Church And Took Pictures Of Churchgoers

What do you think of this church closing? Share this story and let us know in the comments below.

Selena Gomez Offered A Special Commencement Speech To Immigrads Celebrating Their Special Achievement

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Offered A Special Commencement Speech To Immigrads Celebrating Their Special Achievement

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It is graduation season and Covid-19 has changed how we conduct graduation ceremonies. This year, few high school seniors will be able to walk across the stage as states and counties protect their health and offer graduation alternatives. Celebrities have stepped up to give these seniors special commencement speeches.

Selena Gomez wanted to give immigrads a special commencement speech honoring their experience.

“Congratulations to all of the Immigrads,” Gomez says int he video. “I know that this is a virtual ceremony, but it is very real and it is very real to all of the families, and all of you, and your communities. I want you guys to know that you matter and that your experiences are a huge part of the American story.”

Gomez used her speech to connect with the immigrant graduates by relating to their stories.

“When my family came here from Mexico, they set into motion my American story, as well as theirs,” Gomez says. “I’m a proud third-generation American-Mexican, and my family’s journey and their sacrifices helped me get me to where I am today. Mine is not a unique story. Each and every one of you have a similar tale of becoming an American.”

Gomez gave her address for Define American, an immigrant-led organization.

Define American “is a narrative and culture change organization that uses media and the power of storytelling to transcend politics and shift the conversation about immigrants, identity, and citizenship in a changing America,” reads the website.

Gomez fans are here to support the singer and her speech.

Gomez has used her platform to confront major topics in American politics and society. She produced “13 Reasons Why” to enter the conversation about teenage suicide and has used her social media platform to celebrate undocumented immigrants chasing the American Dream.

Gomez ended her speech giving all of the immigrads some words of encouragement.

“So, regardless of where your family is from, regardless of your immigration status, you have taken action to earn an education, to make your families proud, and to open up your worlds,” Gomez says. “So, I’m sending all of my love to you guys today, and congratulations, and I hope that you guys are set off to be everything that you want to be.”

READ: TV Special “Graduate Together” Gave The Class Of 2020 A Special Send-Off

Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

Entertainment

Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

Badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna has never been afraid to speak her mind. She’s a woman who speaks up for issues she cares about and people listen to her. That’s why so many love her – present company included.

The ‘Umbrella’ singer, how has been kind of off the musical radar as of late, spoke out in a new interview with British Vogue and she had a few things to say about her upcoming music, where she’s been living, and her relationship with migrant communities.

Rihanna continues to use her platform and reach of over 200 million followers across social media to bring awareness to social issues that are important to her.

Credit: Chesnot / WireImage

In an interview with Vogue, the creator of “Fenty Beauty” explained feeling empathy with Mexicans and Latinos who are discriminated against in the United States, since she says that she knows how it feels to be on the end of discriminatory policies.

“The Guyanese are like the Mexicans of Barbados,” she said. “So I identify—and that’s why I really relate and empathize with Mexican people or Latino people, who are discriminated against in America. I know what it feels like to have the immigration come into your home in the middle of the night and drag people out.”

Similarly, she recalled the times in which she suffered and the difficulties her and mother experienced when they emigrated from Barbados.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna was born Robyn Rihanna Fenty in St. Michael, Barbados to a Guyanese mother and Barbadian father.

In the Vogue interview, she added: “Let’s say I know what that fight is like. I have witnessed it, I have been there. I think I was eight years old when I had to live that in the middle of the night. So I know how daunting it is for a child, and if my father had been dragged out of my house, I can guarantee you that my life would have been a disaster.”

In that same Vogue interview, Rihanna confessed to something that few people outsider her inner circle even knew.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

She explained that in recent years she has become a bit of a nomad, having a house in London, Paris, Barbados and Mexico, where she feels more relaxed.

“I just love Mexico. I really need to do my DNA test,” she jokingly told Afua Hirsch of Vogue. Perhaps she was an agave plant, in a past life, she pondered.

Rihanna has been vocal about immigrant rights in the past and takes great pride in her origins.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

The Grammy Award winning singer and entrepreneur has very publicly thrown shade at President Trump over his cruel immigration policies.

Rihanna, who’s been appointed as the ambassador of her native country Barbados, is no stranger to political matters. She sent a cease-and-desist letter to President Donald Trump in early November after he played her music at one of his rallies. She also rejected the opportunity to perform during the Super Bowl LIII in February 2019 out of protest for Colin Kaepernick.

Plus, in an interview with The Cut last year about the word ‘immigrant’, she said: “For me, it’s a prideful word. To know that you can come from humble beginnings and just take over whatever you want to, dominate at whatever you put your mind to. The world becomes your oyster, and there’s no limit. Wherever I go, except for Barbados, I’m an immigrant. I think people forget that a lot of times.”