Entertainment

When White Actors Stop Getting All The Good Latino Roles, Maybe We’ll Stop Complaining

Did you know that in 2013, less than 5 percent of movie roles went to Latino actors?

gosling-wtf

Damon replied:

damon-diversity-2

Brown’s reaction said it all.

1430640970110560039

So, Matt Damon, if diversity is achieved through casting, why did your pal Ben Affleck cast himself as Tony Mendez in Argo?

argo-ben-affleck
Credit: Warner Bros.

In 2012, Affleck played CIA agent Tony Mendez, the central character in Argo. Affleck caught plenty of flak for casting himself, and not a Latino actor, in the role. When asked about the decision to play Mendez, Affleck said:

“You know, I obviously went to Tony and sought his approval…was the first thing. And Tony does not have, I don’t know what you would say, a Latin/Spanish accent, of any kind really, and… you know you wouldn’t necessarily select him out of a line of ten people and go ‘This guy’s Latino.’ So I didn’t feel as though I was violating some thing, where, here’s this guy who’s clearly ethnic in some way and it’s sort of being whitewashed by Ben Affleck the actor. I felt very comfortable that if Tony was cool with it, I was cool with it.”

Ben Affleck isn’t the first white actor to play a Latino in a movie. He probably won’t be the last.

why-tho-disney
Credit: Disney

Let’s go back in time… this has been happening for DECADES.

1939: Paul Muni in Juarez

juarez-muni
Credit: Warner Bros.

Muni played Mexican president Benito Juarez in a film that also starred Bette Davis as Carlota of Mexico.

1952: Marlon Brando in Viva Zapata!

brando-zapata

1961: Natalie Wood in West Side Story

natalie-wood-westside
Credit: United Artists

Although Puerto Rican actor Rita Moreno won an Oscar for the role of Anita, white actor Natalie Wood played the Puerto Rican character Maria.

1969: Jack Palance in Che! 

che-palance
Credit: 2oth Century Fox

Jack Palance, on the right, played Fidel Castro. That’s Omar Sharif as Che Guevara.

1989: Armand Assante in The Mambo Kings

mambo-kings-movie 

Credit: Warner Bros.

Assante, an Italian actor, was tasked with playing a Cuban musician named Cesar Castillo.

1993: Ethan Hawke in Alive

ethan-hawke-alive
Credit: Buena Vista Pictures

Hawke played Nando Parrado in Alive, the true story of an Uruguayan rugby team whose plane crashed in the Andes and were forced to take drastic measures to survive.

1995: Marisa Tomei in The Perez Family

perez-family-tomei-1
Credit: The Samuel Goldwyn Company

Tomei played Dorita Evita Perez, a Cuban refugee who makes it to the US in the Mariel boatlift.

1996: Madonna in Evita

madonna-evita
Credit: Buena Vista Pictures

In this musical, Madonna was cast to play Argentine First Lady Eva Perón.

1996: Hank Azaria in The Birdcage

azaria-the-birdcage

2001: Jennifer Connelly in A Beautiful Mind

beautiful-mind
Credit: Universal Pictures

Connelly played John Nash’s wife, Alicia, who was from El Salvador.

But that only happened in the old days, when there were no Latino actors to choose from, right? WRONG.

2011, Carey Mulligan in Drive

drive-mulligan-
Credit: FilmDistrict

The character of Irene was written as a young Latina, but director Nicolas Winding Refn cast Carey Mulligan instead. He told The Huffington Post:

“I couldn’t find any actress that would click with me personally. I couldn’t make a decision for some reason. I had all this talent in front of me and out of the blue I get a call from Carey because she wanted to meet me about doing a movie. She came by the house and she walked in and I realized, ‘Oh my God, this is what I was looking for.’ I wanted to protect her … And I knew that was the Driver’s motivation.”

And one more time, for emphasis: Ben Affleck as Tony Mendez in 2012’s ARGO.

argo-ben-afflect
Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures

So what were you saying about diversity and casting, Matt Damon?

tumblr_lz36tuV0dH1r4ghkoo1_500

Like this story? Click on the share button below to send to all your friends!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Here’s Who We Want to Play Legendary Cuban-American Triple-Threat Sammy Davis Jr. In His Upcoming Biopic

Entertainment

Here’s Who We Want to Play Legendary Cuban-American Triple-Threat Sammy Davis Jr. In His Upcoming Biopic

Photo: Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

Looks like Sammy Davis Jr. is finally getting his place in the sun. On Wednesday, Variety announced that MGM will be producing a biopic about the Cuban-American triple threat. The prolific writer and actor Lena Waithe will be co-producing. The script will be based off of Davis Jr.’s daughter’s biography: “Sammy Davis Jr.: My Father”.

According to reports, the movie will take a close look at the legendary singer’s later life and his relationship with his daughter. It will also give us a peak into Davis Jr.’s younger days, showing us flashbacks from his time as a “child prodigy” to a “global superstar”.

For those who are unfamiliar with Sammy Davis Jr., he was an immensely popular star of ’50s and ’60s. He was what some people would call the original “triple threat”–he could dance, sing, and act. And he did all three excellently.

Throughout his life, he would lie and say his Cuban-born mother, Elvera Sanchez, was of Puerto Rican descent. Later he admitted that he did this because he was afraid that the prevailing anti-Cuban sentiment in the wake of the Cuban missile crisis would have hurt his career.

But Sammy Davis Jr. was perhaps most known for being a member of the legendary “Rat Pack”–a powerful group of Hollywood hotshots that included Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Joey Bishop, and Peter Lawford. Their collective power and raucous Vegas stays made them living legends in their time.

But beneath the fortune and fame, Davis Jr. struggled with internal demons. He was of a victim of the brutal racism of the entertainment industry, as well as his unrelenting health and addiction problems. He eventually died in 1990 at the age of 64 due to cirrhosis.

We hope that the upcoming movie does Sammy Davis Jr.’s story justice! Here are the actors we would love to see fill the very talented shoes of the Afro-Cubano star.

Jharrel Jerome

PHOTO: FRAZER HARRISON / GETTY IMAGES

Jharrel Jerome took the world by storm when he portrayed the wrongly accused Korey Wise in “When They See Us”. His performance was so moving that he won an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series. We’d love to see this gifted Dominican performer try his hand at playing Sammy. It also doesn’t hurt that he has a music career too.

Miguel

Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images for iHeartMedia

Miguel captured our hearts long ago with his powerful but soothing vocals. We fell in love with him even more when the Mexican-American singer sang “Remember Me” at the 2018 Oscars. Plus, he’s acted before. So you know he’s no rookie.

Kid Cudi

Photo: kidcudi/Instagram

You may know Kid Cudi mostly as a hip-hop artist, but this rapper of Mexican descent also has a successful acting career. We also know that he would be able to tap into the pain and struggle of Davis Jr’s inner turmoil.

Elijah Kelley

Photo: oneelijahkelley/Instagram

Elijah Kelley is an immensely multi-talented singer-actor who you may know from hits like “Hairspray” and “The Butler”. He isn’t Afro-Latino (which we would love to see), but he’s a phenomenal singer and dancer. And he even looks a bit like Sammy Davis Jr!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Netflix’s ‘Vampires vs. The Bronx’ Is Your New Quarantine Binge That Hilarious Roasts Gentrifiers

Entertainment

Netflix’s ‘Vampires vs. The Bronx’ Is Your New Quarantine Binge That Hilarious Roasts Gentrifiers

Vampires vs. The Bronx

Over the weekend, to kick off the start of October, streamers unleashed a whole new slate of movies and series to binge while in isolation. To celebrate the Halloween season, most of the films and series are creep-related, drawing from some of our greatest everyday fears as All Hallows’ Eve content is often wont to do.

Using one of the scariest modern-day realities, Netflix’s newest film Vampires vs. The Bronx digs into one of the world’s scariest concepts: gentrification!

Ahh!!

Netflix’s newest movie, Vampires vs. The Bronx, follows three teenage boys fighting to save their neighborhood from bloodsucking gentrifiers.

The horror comedy film was written and directed by “Saturday Night Live” film segment director Osmany Rodriguez. You might know the director from his work on hysterical shorts for SNL including 2018’s “Complicit” which starred Scarlett Johansson as Ivanka Trump. Rodriguez also wrote the series’ faux Levi’s Woke commercial which featured Ryan Gosling, Pete Davidson, Leslie Jones, and Kenan Thompson.

According to Deadline, “Vampires vs. The Bronx” watches as “gentrification from an unlikely and deadly source creeps into the Bronx, a group of teenage friends rally to save the beloved local bodega and fight against a supernatural force intent on taking over their home at all costs.”

The new film takes audiences into the treasures of a neighborhood like The Bronx (like local bodegas and block parties) while introducing its worst nightmares (rocketing real estate prices, kale, and strange new business concepts).

So far, the film which was released on Oct. 2, has received rave reviews.

Speaking about the new Netflix pic, film reviewer RogerEbert.com describes the film as an observation of gentrification “for what it is—a form of white supremacy—and makes it an unmistakable evil, in which the pale monsters try to demoralize the residents by referring to the Bronx as ‘somewhere where no one cares when people disappear.'”

The best part? The new horror-comedy blasts us with all of the Latinidad.

With references to Sammy Sosa, characters who make up the full spectrum of U.S. Latin Americans (including Afro-Latino, and Haitian) this one seems like a classic in the making!

Check out the trailer below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com