Things That Matter

Some Guy is Trying to Make Money With Two Incredibly Sexist Books About Latinas

Yes, there’s a guy out there trying to sell people two of the most sexist, offensive, and ridiculous books about Latinas you’ve ever seen. His name is Joe Bovino, an attorney who fancies himself an expert on women. Despite it being 2016, Bovino doesn’t realize he’s still living decades — we mean decades — in the past.

He’s the author of “Chicaspotting: A Field Guide to Latinas of the United States” and “Why Latinas Get The Guy” and yes, they are as horrible as they sound.

bovino-books
Credit: Joe Bovino / Chicaspotting / Why Latinas Get the Guy

Here are 10 actual excerpts from his books. Points if you manage to not puke while reading them!

First, he identifies each “species” of Latinas:

species-latinas
 Credit: Chicaspotting: A Field Guide to Latinas of the United States

Good to know all Latinas are their own “species,” which include fun things like “Bumbshell” and “Taco Belle.”

Taco-Belle-illustration
Credit: chickspotting.com

How is this man a real person? Like, how?

Then, he breaks down each “species” by appearance:

taco-bell-fast-food
Credit: Chicaspotting: A Field Guide to Latinas of the United States

“Not to be confused with Taco Bell.”  This guy must be a real lady killer.

He also includes highly “scientific” charts and graphs:

traits
Credit: Chicaspotting: A Field Guide to Latinas of the United States

Seriously, what year does this guy come from? Is he actually using clip art in his book? 

And he LITERALLY breaks down a woman by her body parts:

parts-of-a-chica
Credit: Joe Bovino / Why Latinas Get the Guy

And, of course, he has plenty of words to describe breasts and butts.

He generalizes a whole lot, too:

being-older
Credit: Chicaspotting: A Field Guide to Latinas of the United States

Bet this guy’s abuela is real proud of him. Actually, bet his primas, hermanas and tías are just over the moon to be related to him!

Oh, and he uses super classy visual aids:

bumbshell
Credit: Chicaspotting: A Field Guide to Latinas of the United States

This SO accurately depicts Brazilian women! Wow, it’s really crazy how smart and on point this guy is.

He pits Latinas against non-Latinas and it’s as disgusting as it sounds.

killjoy

Credit: Joe Bovino / Why Latinas Get The Guy

Ahhh, yes, the “cold manly way” that American women sleep around. Totally okay for men to sleep around, but ladies?! NO! You’re crazy if you want to have sex with more than one guy! “Men lose respect for women who sleep around or have sex too quickly, especially on the first date.” Gotta love this guy’s ability to be a jerk so many times in just a few paragraphs.

READ: These Mexican Women Found an Incredible Way to Fight Back Against Cat-Callers

He makes sure you know Latinas are just sitting around, waiting for a man:doesnt-feel

Credit: Joe Bovino / Why Latinas Get The Guy

“If he doesn’t feel like a man, he won’t act like one.” Right – and never forget, there’s a Latina just lurking around, waiting for her validation through a man! Joe Bovino just really gets it, yanno?

He really understands how women feel and what goes through their minds:

makes-them-look-happy
Credit: Why Latinas Get The Guy

Yes, all Latinas can be lumped together into one category of women who only care about how we look because it makes us feel better about ourselves. Riiiiiight.

He’s also an expert on how Latinas have sex:

sex-like-a-latina
Credit: Joe Bovino / Why Latinas Get The Guy

And he’s encouraging American women, in general, to have sex like Latinas! Bravo, Joe, you’re really a smart dude who totally “gets” women.

Overall, this guy is the worst. But it all make sense if you see his other books. Here’s one of ’em:

field-guide
Credit: The Joe Bovino Field Guide to Chicks of the United States

Forget the horrific books themselves – why didn’t anyone stop the cover of the books?! The only thing worse than the words inside are the heinous illustrations.

Have you encountered sexism as a Latina? mitú wants to know. Leave a comment below. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

The Number Of Latinos In The U.S Killed By Covid-19 Surpasses 44,500 With No Signs Of Slowing Down

Things That Matter

The Number Of Latinos In The U.S Killed By Covid-19 Surpasses 44,500 With No Signs Of Slowing Down

Wilfredo Lee / Getty Images

For months we have heard stories from our neighbors and our friends of people losing loved ones to Covid-19. It seems that with each passing day the degrees of separation from ourselves and the virus gets smaller and smaller.

Although this is true for all demographics, it’s particularly true for the Latino community. New data shows that although Latinos make up about 19% of the national population, we account for nearly a third of all deaths. These numbers are staggering and experts are warning that entire communities are being decimated by the pandemic.

More than 44,500 Latinos have died of Covid-19 in the United States.

It’s no secret that the Coronavirus has ravaged our community but now we have concrete numbers that show just how bad the pandemic has been among Latinos. According to new data from the COVID Tracking Project, over 44,500 of the nearly 211,000 people in the U.S. killed by the Coronavirus to date are Latino.

While Latinos are under 19 percent of the U.S. population, we make up almost one-third of Coronavirus deaths nationwide, according to CDC data analyzed by Salud America, a health research institute in San Antonio. Among some age groups, like those 35 to 44, the distribution of Latino Covid deaths is almost 50 percent; among Latinos ages 45-54, it’s almost 44 percent.

Experts say several factors account for higher COVID-19 death and infection rates among Latinos versus whites, including poverty, health care disparities, the prevalence of serious underlying medical conditions, and greater exposure to the virus at work because of the kinds of working-class, essential jobs many Latinos have.

Many Latinos who have been infected or died of the Coronavirus are front-line or essential workers.

Credit: Wilfredo Lee / Getty Images

So many of our family members and neighbors work jobs that are now considered “essential.” From building cleaning services, to restaurant workers, grocery store employees, nurses, and farm workers, our community is on the front lines more than any other community in this fight against the pandemic.

In fact, 41.2 percent of all front-line workers are Black, Hispanic or Asian-American/Pacific Islander, according to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, an economic policy think tank. Hispanics are especially overrepresented in building cleaning services (40.2 percent of workers).

Latinos also have the highest uninsured rates of any racial or ethnic group in the U.S., according to the Department of Health and Human Services. All of these factors add up to a dangerous and deadly combination that has resulted in the outsized number of deaths among Latinos.

Some are saying that the virus is causing the ‘historic decimation’ of Latinos.

Speaking at a virtual Congressional Hispanic Caucus meeting last week, a global health expert warned that the Coronavirus is causing “the historic decimation” of the Latino community, ravaging generations of loved ones in Hispanic families.

To illustrate his point, Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of Tropical Medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, read off descriptions of people who died on Aug. 13 in Houston alone.

“Hispanic male, Hispanic male, Hispanic male, black male, Hispanic male, black male, Hispanic male, Hispanic female, black female, black male, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic” Hotez said, adding that many are people in their 40s, 50s and 60s.

“This virus is taking away a whole generation of mothers and fathers and brothers and sisters, you know, who are young kids, teenage kids. And it occurred to me that what we’re seeing really is the historic decimation among the Hispanic community by the virus,” he said.

Dr. Anthony Fauci – a popular figure in the fight against Coronavirus – has also raised the alarm.

The nation’s leading infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, gave a recent update on the impact on the Latino community. He pointed out that hospitalizations among Latinos 359 per 100,000 compared to 78 in whites. Deaths related to Covid-19 are 61 per 100,000 in the Latino population compared to 40 in whites, and Latinos represent 45 percent of deaths of people younger than 21, Fauci said.

Fauci said the country can begin to address this “extraordinary problem” now by making sure the community gets adequate testing and immediate access to care. But he said this is not a one-shot resolution.

“This must now reset and re-shine a light on this disparity related to social determinants of health that are experienced by the Latinx community — the fact that they have a higher incidence of co-morbidities, which put you at risk,” Fauci said.

Fauci also urged the Latino congressional members on the call to get their Latino constituents to consider enrolling in vaccination trials so they can be proven to be safe in everyone, including African Americans and Latinos.

“We need to get a diverse representation of the population in the clinical trials,” he said.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Black Women Know Exactly Why Kamala Harris Had To Hold Back In the Debate Last Night

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Black Women Know Exactly Why Kamala Harris Had To Hold Back In the Debate Last Night

Photo: via Getty Images

Kamala Harris’s debate performance on Wednesday night was admirable on so many fronts. She had done her research and was prepared with talking points and answers. She was calm and measured, a constant smile on her face. She never raised her voice.

In essence, her demeanor was the exact opposite of President Donald Trump’s at the presidential debate the week before. Trump had been veritably unhinged–yelling, ranting, insulting, and constantly interrupting former Vice President Joe Biden.

But Kamala Harris did make headlines for a statement she made, possibly her most assertive statement of the night: “Mr. Vice President,” she said after being talked over by Vice President Pence yet again. “I’m speaking.”

“I’m speaking” swiftly went viral on social media, quickly being meme-ified and retweeted by her supporters.

But not everyone loved that Harris had the dignity to assert herself. When speaking with Fox News about what he thought of the Vice Presidential debate, President Donald Trump called Harris a “monster” and pronounced her as “totally unlikable.” For Black women around the world, the insults Trump lobbed at Harris were seen for the dog whistles that they were.

Harris and every other Black woman in America is deeply familiar with the pervasive racial stereotype of the “Angry Black Woman”. The “Angry Black Woman” is a bitter and emotional woman who has let the circumstances of her life carve out a chip on her shoulder. And the media is quick to peddle this narrative.

Look no farther than the public flaying of Michelle Obama during the early days of Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign. The negative headlines about Michelle ranged from “Michelle Obama Hates America” to “Just Say No to Mrs. Obama“. And the vitriol aimed at her on social media was especially vile.

The former First Lady spoke candidly about the media’s unfair treatment of her while promoting her memoir “Becoming” at the 2019 Essence Festival.

“People from all sides, Democrats and Republicans, tried to take me out by the knees,” Obama told host, Gayle King. “And the best way they could do it was to focus on the strength of the Black woman, so they turned that into a caricature. For a minute there, I was an angry Black woman who was emasculating her husband.”

But the effects of misogynoir–which is defined as the specific hatred, dislike, distrust, and prejudice directed toward Black women–are not limited to public figures. They are ubiquitous.

Even I, a Black woman who is not at all in the public eye, experience misogynoir constantly.

Recently, I was lamenting to my brother over the fact that I am perpetually single. During our conversation, I was brainstorming possible reasons as to why no man wanted to commit to me. “From my perspective,” my brother (who is also Black) told me, “you’re too loud.” He continued: “It’s intimidating. If I were a guy, that would scare me right off.”

His comments stung.

I called a girlfriend later, my heart hurting, my feelings of undesirability and unfemininity coupled with that all-too-familiar feeling of shame that comes with simply existing as a Black woman on the planet–and especially as a Black woman in white spaces. But I was unable to articulate the uneasiness I felt at his comments. “I can’t help who I am,” I said to her.

“It’s a double standard,” she responded. “Our friend Jocelyn is just as loud as you are–ask anyone. But no one would ever tell her that her loudness is a negative trait, or something that she should change about herself in order to land a man. But Jocelyn is white.”

I felt the burden of my identity like a bag of bricks in that moment. I knew that whatever I used to shield myself from misogynoir–a good job, a college education, fancy clothes and makeup–none of it would ever fully shield me from the racism and sexism I would face for the rest of my life.

Kamala Harris’s debate performance was measured and grounded because she knew she had to package herself to be palatable to white America.

After all, Harris already recently faced some media backlash over what critics called her unfair treatment of (now running mate, then-rival) Joe Biden at the Democratic Primary Debate. Now, it seems, Harris has changed tactics.

Kamala Harris doesn’t have the luxury of being loud or combative or angry–all feelings that would otherwise be completely justified in today’s political climate. Instead, in order to be taken seriously as a Vice Presidential candidate, she must devote a significant amount of her time and energy to being likeable. Trustworthy. Ladylike.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com