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Miguel Opens Up About Being Biracial And Gushes About His Mexican Abuelita’s Amazing Food – Which Is Way More Than Just Tacos

“Being Black Is A Different Thing”

Fresh off the set of “Live By Night” Miguel stopped by the Telemundo studios to talk about his role in the movie directed by Ben Affleck. In the film he plays Estéban Suárez, a rum trader from Cuba who owns a rum business with his sister Graciela. His sister is played by none other than Zoe Saldana who could probably pass as his sister in real life. Although the host interviewed Miguel in Spanish, Miguel tried his best to keep up. Hearing his family speak Spanish at home helps him understand the language, he said, and he’s working toward improving so he can Speak it better.

And while he’s working on perfecting his Spanish in real life, he actually had to work on thickening his accent in English for the movie to fit the profile of the Cuban character. For inspiration, Miguel revealed that he studied Desi Arnaz’s accent. (Those old enough remember him as Ricky Ricardo from “I Love Lucy.”)

Movie aside, Miguel talked about growing up bi-racial and gushed about having the best food growing up thanks to his Nana (abuelita). And he made it clear she makes way more than just tacos. But not everything was easy for him. As he says he experienced first hand, “being black is a different thing” in the United States.

The conversation got a little lighter as they continued walking through the hallways. The host asked Miguel if he grew up watching telenovelas to which he responded very excited by singing the theme song to “Luz Clarita.” Wildly random, but we take that as a yes.


READ: Miguel Loses It On Stage For Black Lives Matter

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Miguel, A.CHAL, Cuco and More Music You Need For Nu Music Fridays

Latidomusic

Miguel, A.CHAL, Cuco and More Music You Need For Nu Music Fridays

Welcome to Nu Music Fridays, where we give you our best picks of the week in Latin music released on Friday, April 9th. Check out our full list below!

Miguel – Art Dealer Chic 4 EP

Miguel surprised fans by dropping a follow-up to his Art Dealer Chic series from 2012 with Art Dealer Chic 4. The project has 4 songs and features the previously released single “Funeral.” Get into ADC vibes.

Cuco – “Paradise”

Roll down your car windows, hold your significant other’s hand and blast “Paradise” to tell them how much they mean to you. Cuco is BACK, ladies and gentlemen.

Since we’re talking Cuco and Miguel, let’s bring back when they performed TUGETHER for us here at mitú.

Manuel Turizo – Dopamina album

Colombian crooner Manuel Turizo released his follow-up album to his 2019 debut ADN with Dopamina. The album comes packed with collabs with El Alfa, will.i.am, Farruko, Myke Towers, Rauw Alejandro, Dalex, Justin Quiles and Maluma. We actually had an exclusive interview with Maluma and he talked to us about working with Manuel for their new single “Amor en Coma.”

A.CHAL – TAPPD’N

Peruvian singer-songwriter A.CHAL sprinkled in some Spanish words in his new single “TAPPD’N.” The rise to the top hasn’t been easy, but A.CHAL is enjoying the process.

Cami – “Luna”

Argentinian singer Cami shows off her vocal prowess with new emotional single “Luna.”

Big Soto – The Good Trip album

Venezuela’s Latin Urban star Big Soto released his star-packed album The Good Trip, which also has an accompanying music video for each song.

J Balvin & Khalid – “Otra Noche Sin Ti

J Balvin and Khalid join forces on a slow R&B beat for “Otra Noche Sin Ti,” where they want their ex-lover to come back. Read more about the collab here and get into all the feels.

Imanbek & Sean Paul feat. Sofia Reyes – “Dancing On Dangerous”

Russian DJ Imanbek recruited Sean Paul and Sofia Reyes for a new EDM track “Dancing on Dangerous,” which will get you ready to blast it full volume this summer.

Jay Menez – “Promete”

The night looks promising and Dominican artist Jay Menez knows it. Check out his new single “Promete.”

Myke Towers & Ñengo Flow – “BURBERRY”

The release for Lyke Myke feels imminent and Myke Towers dropped Latin Trap anthem “BURBERRY” featuring Ñengo Flow to get us ready for the bangers that are on the way.

Young Gatillo Feat. Rochy RD – “Cintura de Mono Remix”

Two of Dominican Republic’s artists on the rise Young Gatillo and Rochy RD team up for Dembow hit “Cintura de Mono Remix.”

Mon Laferte – Seis album

Chilean singer-songwriter Mon Laferte is back with her new album Seis, where she tackles different genres. We actually had the chance to interview Mon Laferte to talk about Seis, the Gloria Trevi collab and more here.

READ: Rauw Alejandro Lives His ’80s Pop Fantasy in Marc Seguí’s “Tiroteo” Remix Music Video

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Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Things That Matter

Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Photo via George W. Davis, Public Domain

Today, March 22nd marks Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud in Puerto Rico–the date that marks the emancipation of slaves in Puerto Rico. In Puerto Rico, enslaved peoples were emancipated in 1873–a full decade after the U.S. officially abolished slavery. But unlike the U.S. mainland, Puerto Rico celebrates today as an official holiday, where many businesses are closed.

The emancipation of Puerto Rican slaves was a very different process than the United States’. For one, the emancipation was gradual and over three years.

When the Spanish government abolished slavery in Puerto Rico 1873, enslaved men and women had to buy their freedom. The price was set by their “owners”. The way the emancipated slaves bought their freedom was through a process that was very similar to sharecropping in the post-war American south. Emancipated slaves farmed, sold goods, and worked in different trades to “buy” their freedom.

In the same Spanish edict that abolished slavery, slaves over the age of 60 were automatically freed. Enslaved children who were 5-years-old and under were also automatically freed.

Today, Black and mixed-race Puerto Ricans of Black descent make up a large part of Puerto Rico’s population.

The legacy of enslaved Black Puerto Ricans is a strong one. Unlike the United States, Puerto Rico doesn’t classify race in such black-and-white terms. Puerto Ricans are taught that everyone is a mixture of three groups of people: white Spanish colonizers, Black African slaves, and the indigenous Taíno population.

African influences on Puerto Rican culture is ubiquitous and is present in Puerto Rican music, cuisine, and even in the way that the island’s language evolved. And although experts estimate that up to 60% of Puerto Ricans have significant African ancestry, almost 76% of Puerto Ricans identified as white only in the latest census poll–a phenomenon that many sociologists have blamed on anti-blackness.

On Puerto Rico’s Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud, many people can’t help but notice that the island celebrates a day of freedom and independence when they are not really free themselves.

As the fight for Puerto Rican decolonization rages on, there is a bit of irony in the fact that Puerto Rico is one of the only American territories that officially celebrates the emancipation of slaves, when Puerto Rico is not emancipated from the United States. Yes, many Black Americans recognize Juneteenth (June 19th) as the official day to celebrate emancipation from slavery, but it is not an official government holiday.

Perhaps, Puerto Rico celebrates this historical day of freedom because they understand how important the freedom and independence is on a different level than mainland Americans do.

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