Entertainment

11 Music Bands that Own the Streets of LA

Punk, cumbia, new wave, reggae — there’s a legion of Latino music bands from Los Angeles that are borrowing rhythms from all over the globe and making them their own. Here are 11 essential LA bands you should check out.

La Chamba Cumbia Chicha

La Chamba Cumbia Chicha
Photo Credit: The Get Down Collective / Facebook

They carve a Peruvian sound with an East LA twist and a band name that means “to put in work.” Think cumbia with guitar leads and heavy bass lines. A working-class message that is, as they put it, “adding a rhythm to the daily bustle of life.”

More: Facebook, Bandcamp

Las Cafeteras

Las Cafeteras
Photo Credit: Las Cafeteras / Facebook

This is an active group that has unapologetically created a hybrid sound of Son Jarocho, hip hop and pop. An East LA music scene staple with an infectious, politically conscious sound, Las Cafeteras have created a sound that crosses generational lines.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Chicano Batman

mituworld
Photo Credit: Josué Rivas / chicanobatman.com

Their most recent achievement is being added to the lineup for Coachella 2015. Led by Mexican-Colombian Bardo Martinez, their sound is probably the most experimental on this list. Blend romantic ’70s Latin American music with its heavy keyboard sound add a Pink Floyd feel and sprinkle with funk.

More: Official Site, Facebook

READ: Irene Diaz – From Trader Joe’s to Touring Musician

Thee Commons

Thee Commons
Photo Credit: Cristian Vargas / Facebook

With a new approach to an old vibe, this three-piece band brings an aggressive, stripped down sound — think cumbia channeling punk. A rebellious, youthful is sure to win over new fans; their covers of Selena and Los Caminantes are must-listens. With nine independent albums last year alone, their momentum keeps growing.

More: Facebook, Bandcamp

Viento Callejero

Viento Callejero
Photo Credit: Farah Stop / Facebook

This is the band that other bands go see. They are open to many sounds but the thread that binds them together is funk. Also a three-piece, the difference is that Viento Callejero have rotating singers, so the focus is the sound. The technique seems to be working for them as they are quickly gaining traction throughout the Los Angeles music scene.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Buyepongo

Buyepongo
Photo Credit: Buyepongo / Facebook

Mixing afro beats with hip hop swag, Buyepongo has been hitting the scene hard for a few years. If you’ve ever been to one of their shows, you know that the groove will have you dancing all night long. Hailing from Norwalk, Calif., this group keeps the party going well into the morning hours.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Boogaloo Assassins

Boogaloo Assassins
Photo Credit: Wendy Le / Facebook

The musical is in the bands’ name, boogaloo, a genre that took root in New York City. Thrown into this mix of 60s sounds are soul, salsa and other Latin rhythms. They’ve been active since 2007 and have a strong following throughout Southern California. It’s like having a slice of New York in Los Angeles.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Zapoteca Roots

Zapoteca Roots
Photo Credit: Zapoteca Roots / Facebook

Reggae meets Sonidero. What sets this group apart is the it has created. The “Sonidero” sound is a Mexican type of cumbia that has many fans in LA, and Zapoteca Roots caters to them. They create a contemporary vibe that will bring back memories of family gatherings and quinceañeras.

More: Facebook, Twitter

ECNO (El Conjunto Nueva Ola)

ECNO
Photo Credit: ECNO / Facebook

ECNO has managed to turn New Wave ’80s classics into new cumbia mash ups. This Mexico City band hit the scene with a fury and acquired fans just as quickly. But they don’t consider themselves a cover band. They’re more interested in keeping the new wave melodies and giving the lyrics new life. Oh, and they wear luchador masks.

More: Official Site, Facebook

La Santa Cecilia

La Santa Cecilia
Photo Credit: La Santa Cecilia / Facebook

Perhaps the best known band on this list is Latin Grammy Award-winner La Santa Cecilia. They’ve come a long way from playing free fundraisers. Lead vocalist “Marisoul” has a voice that many have compared to classic rock icon Janis Joplin. An eclectic sound that covers a wide range of genres has been key to their success.

More: Official Site, Facebook

El-Haru Kuroi

El-Haru Kuroi
Photo Credit: El-Haru Kuroi / Facebook

This bossa nova-influenced trio has been under the radar but they’ve definitely got a of their own. They combine Mexican, Central American and African sounds and rhythms at a pace that echoes punk. This year they plan on expanding their fan base by taking their blistering sound to the midwest.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Read: Yes, Latinos Were Present During the Birth of Hip Hop

Bad Bunny’s ‘Yo Perreo Sola’ Music Video Has Drag, Female Empowerment, And Artistic Styling That Is World-Class

Entertainment

Bad Bunny’s ‘Yo Perreo Sola’ Music Video Has Drag, Female Empowerment, And Artistic Styling That Is World-Class

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Bad Bunny is known to push gender norms and supports the LGBTQ+ community. His music videos are artistic expressions of the world he wants to live in. His latest music video for the song “Yo Perreo Sola” is catching everyone’s attention for several reasons including the trapero singing and dancing in full drag.

Bad Bunny starts his “Yo Perreo Sola” music video in a hot red leather drag outfit.

Like, dayum. The Puerto Rican trap star did not hold back. His look was everything as he gave us some “Oops…I Did It Again” dominatrix vibes. The fans were not prepared for this but it seems that most of them are all for Bad Bunny pushing boundaries even further in Latin trap.

The imagery is literally being celebrated for its strong statement for the LGBTQ+ community.

Bad Bunny was very outspoken about Alexa Negrón Luciano, a trans woman who was murdered in Puerto Rico and misgendered in media reports. The singer was on “The Late Show starring Jimmy Fallon” and used the moment to protest the treatment of Luciano’s legacy. Bad Bunny wore a shirt that read in Spanish, “They killed Alexa, not a man in a skirt.”

Bad Bunny fans were ready to defend their fave and his new music video.

To many, Latin trap is still a place where homophobia and misogyny fester in lyrics by some of the top performers. Bad Bunny is one artist that has been fighting against that culture from within. He has bent gender norms in music videos and it has set his career apart from other Latin trap musicians.

And they are all celebrating the anguish of straight men who listen to Bad Bunny and have social hang-ups.

The same homophobia in Latin trap is reflected within the community. Bad Bunny’s unapologetic willingness to take gender and flip it on its head is just one thing fans love about the trapero.

You can watch the full video below.

Bad Bunny never disappoints, does he?

READ: Bad Bunny Is The Modern Icon The Queer Latino Community Needs And Deserves Right Now. Here’s Why

Someone Turned Cardi B’s Coronavirus Rant Into A Remix Now It’s On The Billboard Charts

Entertainment

Someone Turned Cardi B’s Coronavirus Rant Into A Remix Now It’s On The Billboard Charts

Cardi B/ Instagram

Who knew Cardi B’s rants could be music to someone’s ears.

If you haven’t already heard, Cardi B went one very long Instagram rant about the Coronavirus pandemic and its global repercussions. Last Wednesday, the Dominican rapper posted a 46-second video on Instagram airing out her fears and grievances about the disease. Towards the end of the clip Cardi B delivered the lines “Coronavirus! S*** is real! S*** is getting real!”

Now it’s Billboard hit.

Over the weekend, the Brooklyn-based DJ iMarkkeyz chopped up the soundbite and released a track called “Coronavirus.” The bit has Cardi B’s rant on loop as a trap beat plays beneath it. It didn’t take long for “Coronavirus” to take off– the song we mean. The song broke into the pop charts internationally in Bulgaria and Brazil over the weekend and eventually began to climb the ranks of iTunes. By Thursday the song was top 10 in the United States iTunes chart.

You might think the song’s virality is just another schtick but uh uh.

Cardi B and iMarkkeyz have pledged to donate proceeds from streams and downloads to go towards those affected by Coronavirus.

According to Billboard “As preliminary reports indicated, the remixed tune ‘Coronavirus’ sold 3,000 copies in the week ending March 19, according to Nielsen Music/MRC Data. The sales total prompts a No. 9 debut on Billboard’s Rap Digital Song Sales and a No. 13 start on the R&B/Hip-Hop Digital Song Sales charts dated March 28. In addition, ‘Coronavirus’ picked up 626,000 U.S. on-demand streams in the same period”

Check out the new hit below!