Entertainment

11 Music Bands that Own the Streets of LA

Punk, cumbia, new wave, reggae — there’s a legion of Latino music bands from Los Angeles that are borrowing rhythms from all over the globe and making them their own. Here are 11 essential LA bands you should check out.

La Chamba Cumbia Chicha

La Chamba Cumbia Chicha
Photo Credit: The Get Down Collective / Facebook

They carve a Peruvian sound with an East LA twist and a band name that means “to put in work.” Think cumbia with guitar leads and heavy bass lines. A working-class message that is, as they put it, “adding a rhythm to the daily bustle of life.”

More: Facebook, Bandcamp

Las Cafeteras

Las Cafeteras
Photo Credit: Las Cafeteras / Facebook

This is an active group that has unapologetically created a hybrid sound of Son Jarocho, hip hop and pop. An East LA music scene staple with an infectious, politically conscious sound, Las Cafeteras have created a sound that crosses generational lines.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Chicano Batman

mituworld
Photo Credit: Josué Rivas / chicanobatman.com

Their most recent achievement is being added to the lineup for Coachella 2015. Led by Mexican-Colombian Bardo Martinez, their sound is probably the most experimental on this list. Blend romantic ’70s Latin American music with its heavy keyboard sound add a Pink Floyd feel and sprinkle with funk.

More: Official Site, Facebook

READ: Irene Diaz – From Trader Joe’s to Touring Musician

Thee Commons

Thee Commons
Photo Credit: Cristian Vargas / Facebook

With a new approach to an old vibe, this three-piece band brings an aggressive, stripped down sound — think cumbia channeling punk. A rebellious, youthful is sure to win over new fans; their covers of Selena and Los Caminantes are must-listens. With nine independent albums last year alone, their momentum keeps growing.

More: Facebook, Bandcamp

Viento Callejero

Viento Callejero
Photo Credit: Farah Stop / Facebook

This is the band that other bands go see. They are open to many sounds but the thread that binds them together is funk. Also a three-piece, the difference is that Viento Callejero have rotating singers, so the focus is the sound. The technique seems to be working for them as they are quickly gaining traction throughout the Los Angeles music scene.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Buyepongo

Buyepongo
Photo Credit: Buyepongo / Facebook

Mixing afro beats with hip hop swag, Buyepongo has been hitting the scene hard for a few years. If you’ve ever been to one of their shows, you know that the groove will have you dancing all night long. Hailing from Norwalk, Calif., this group keeps the party going well into the morning hours.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Boogaloo Assassins

Boogaloo Assassins
Photo Credit: Wendy Le / Facebook

The musical is in the bands’ name, boogaloo, a genre that took root in New York City. Thrown into this mix of 60s sounds are soul, salsa and other Latin rhythms. They’ve been active since 2007 and have a strong following throughout Southern California. It’s like having a slice of New York in Los Angeles.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Zapoteca Roots

Zapoteca Roots
Photo Credit: Zapoteca Roots / Facebook

Reggae meets Sonidero. What sets this group apart is the it has created. The “Sonidero” sound is a Mexican type of cumbia that has many fans in LA, and Zapoteca Roots caters to them. They create a contemporary vibe that will bring back memories of family gatherings and quinceañeras.

More: Facebook, Twitter

ECNO (El Conjunto Nueva Ola)

ECNO
Photo Credit: ECNO / Facebook

ECNO has managed to turn New Wave ’80s classics into new cumbia mash ups. This Mexico City band hit the scene with a fury and acquired fans just as quickly. But they don’t consider themselves a cover band. They’re more interested in keeping the new wave melodies and giving the lyrics new life. Oh, and they wear luchador masks.

More: Official Site, Facebook

La Santa Cecilia

La Santa Cecilia
Photo Credit: La Santa Cecilia / Facebook

Perhaps the best known band on this list is Latin Grammy Award-winner La Santa Cecilia. They’ve come a long way from playing free fundraisers. Lead vocalist “Marisoul” has a voice that many have compared to classic rock icon Janis Joplin. An eclectic sound that covers a wide range of genres has been key to their success.

More: Official Site, Facebook

El-Haru Kuroi

El-Haru Kuroi
Photo Credit: El-Haru Kuroi / Facebook

This bossa nova-influenced trio has been under the radar but they’ve definitely got a of their own. They combine Mexican, Central American and African sounds and rhythms at a pace that echoes punk. This year they plan on expanding their fan base by taking their blistering sound to the midwest.

More: Official Site, Facebook

Read: Yes, Latinos Were Present During the Birth of Hip Hop

He’s The Internet’s Embarrassing Uncle And TikTok Users Can’t Get Enough Of His Goofy Content

Entertainment

He’s The Internet’s Embarrassing Uncle And TikTok Users Can’t Get Enough Of His Goofy Content

@Doggface208 / TikTok

Everyone has that embarrassing uncle. The one who busts out dancing in public, or makes incredibly old-school dad jokes. Embarrassing uncles keep you guessing what they’ll do next and oftentimes you and your cousins are embarrassed by his bizarre behavior. If you can’t think of an embarrassing uncle, chances are it’s you, you’re the embarrassing uncle or tía. This Mexican man from Wyoming is the quintessential embarrassing uncle, except the internet, unlike your cousins, is loving every minute of his antics. 

Tío TikTok might be a little older than the app’s intended audience, but he still managed to make his content go viral, even when he didn’t even know what TikTok was.

Credit: @Doggface208 / TikTok

Tío TikTok aka Nathan Apodaca is the grown man who’s single-handedly bringing Gen-Z app TikTok, to Millennials. If you’re wondering what TikTok is, don’t worry. It is basically the second-coming of Vine. It is all about short videos that play in a loop for everyone to enjoy. 

Remember Musical.ly? Maybe you remember the times of Vine? It’s hard to keep up with the constantly changing social media landscape as some apps gain notoriety, others merge, and even more die out. As non-members of the Gen Z generation, it’s even harder to keep it all straight.

The old app Musical.ly was rebranded as TikTok and it’s quickly become Gen Z’s app of choice.

If you do remember Musical.ly, you may know that in August 2018, it rebranded as TikTok. And Vine? That app was the victim of an ever-changing internet and suffered a slow death, causing users to feel the dejection of media abandonment. TikTok though has stirred up a revival of short video clips. Only now, it’s even more interactive, collaborative, and downright addictive.

Apodaca was introduced to the app by his Gen Z daughters, and his videos soon went viral.

Tío TikTok was unaware of the popular video-app himself. His daughters, Makyla and Angelia, are the ones who first introduced Apocada’s to the platform. His youngest daughter even helped him film his first video, which quickly went viral. Apodaca confesses that he was stumped as to what to do, or what type of content to publish on his app, but his eldest daughter came to the rescue and suggested he did his usual goofy dances on camera. And just like that, Apodaca turned into a TikTok sensation.

Tío TikTok’s 16-second videos are simple and hilarious, and they touch a chord with young audiences for their humor.

Credit: @Doggface208 / TikTok

Apodaca shares 16-second bite-sized clips of himself dancing and performing to a tune. His perfectly in-sync interpretations, have gained him nearly 90 thousand followers. Tío TikTok usually jams out to classic ’90s gangsta rap like DMX, Dr. Dre, Eminem or Twista and Gen Z-ers and Millennials alike, can’t seem to get enough of his nostalgic vibes.

In his video’s he’s usually goofing around at work or high off weed which has made his content recognizable.

In one of his most liked posts, Nathan is seen sitting on a conveyor belt lip-syncing Sublime’s ’90s classic hit ‘Santeria’ at the factory where he works and films most of his videos. The post earned 26.9 thousand likes and received thousands of hilarious comments like “*OSHA has entered the chat*” by @BertoBitch or “The workers that package for WISH…”

Apodaca is the stoner uncle you never knew you needed on social media.

His hashtags regularly include 420, 710, ‘high’ and ‘gogreen’, stoner terms used to celebrate dabs and cannabis concentrates. His song choices, usually pulled from an unpredictably random selection, often celebrate the plant too. @Doggface208 aka Nathan Apodaca loves weed so much that he, ingeniously, linked his PayPal account on his TikTok bio for donations; “Now accepting donations 4 Flower 🍃 n white Ts PayPal apodacadogg208@gmail.com” reads his profile description. Whether the account is real or not, we’re not sure, but you’re welcome to send a little donation and let us know.

Most TikTok users may be under 30 according to Apple Store download stats, but we’re sure that this guy’s hilarious videos will attract an older demographic to download the app too.

READ: This 11-Year-Old Latina Has Thousands Of Followers On TikTok And The Most Hilarious Sense Of Humor About Latinidad

Ranchero Star ‘Paquita La Del Barrio’ Was Hospitalized Due To Pulmonary Complications

Entertainment

Ranchero Star ‘Paquita La Del Barrio’ Was Hospitalized Due To Pulmonary Complications

We still haven’t recovered from the passing of ‘El príncipe de la canción’ José José and we’re already being hit with more bad news. After much speculation on social media, it has been confirmed that the controversial and iconic singer Paquita La del Barrio was hospitalized this week for pneumonia and pulmonary thrombosis. 

Paquita La del Barrio changed the genre of Bolero music forever with her salty man-hating lyrics and ‘borrachera’ worthy songs.

credit Instagram @paquitaofficialb

In her over 50 years of creating music, ‘La Guerrillera del Bolero’, Paquita la del Barrio has gifted us with endless beautifully shady catchphrases to use on shitty exes; “Rata de dos patas”, “Cucaracha del infierno” and “¿Me estas oyendo inútil?” to name a few. Her man-hating words changed Bolero music for women and will be sung in tequila-induced ‘borracheras’ until the end of time. Paquita’s controversial, and sometimes salty lyrics have earned her a few enemies, to say the least, but the truth is that Paquita La del Barrio shattered glass ceilings in the genre of Ranchero, a world of male-dominated, misogynistic music, just by speaking her mind through music.

The feminist ranchera canceled a show for the first time in her career, due to health complications.

Francisca Viveros Barradas a self-proclaimed warrior against ‘machismo’ culture, canceled a show scheduled for this Saturday in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, due to health complications. Francisco Torres, her manager —also known as Paquito— said in a public statement for the press, that Paquita had complained of ongoing chest pains which eventually landed her at Hospital Angeles Lindavista in Mexico City. “Siempre te imaginas lo peor,” he said. It was later discovered that the pain was caused by a pulmonary embolism and pneumonia. The 72-year-old singer was checked into intensive care for a 24-hour watch.

Torres confirmed that Paquita’s health first raised concerns on October 8,  “She started with discomfort, her blood pressure, she said her chest hurt. That night the situation worsened, she couldn’t stand, she complained about chest pain, and the first thing that came to mind was ‘her heart’. A doctor came,  prescribed medication and administered her a sedative, we thought she’d be better by morning. But she wasn’t.”

The singer’s health is now improving and she’s no longer in ICU.

Credit Instagram @paquitaoficialb

‘Paquito’ went on to describe how the star’s health continued to deteriorate; “The next day she still had chest and back pain,” he said, “we decided to call an ambulance and take her to the emergency room.” Paquita La del Barrio’s manager explained that doctors diagnosed the singer with pulmonary damage due to the varying weather conditions the 72-year-old had been exposed to during her tour of the United States. “We know that weather conditions in the U.S. are more extreme, that was added to her condition, she resisted until her lungs collapsed,” Torres confirmed that Paquita la del Barrio was in ICU on October 10 but is now stable and her health is improving. It seems like the singer is recuperating just fine, but will still need time to heal, which is why she was forced to cancel the concert scheduled for this weekend. 

‘La Guerrillera del Bolero’ has sung against machismo for over forty years, and although she’s received a lot of criticism, her words have resonated with audiences worldwide.

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Way ahead of her time, Paquita has fought machismo singing from the stage for more than four decades. At 72, the feminist ranchera has released 33 albums which have been classified by the genre as “duros contra ellos” for her harsh words against men. Amongst her many shade-throwing songs are “Tres veces te engañé”, “Las mujeres mandan”, “Viejo raboverde”, “Hombres malvados” and many more. Her most famous hit “Rata de dos patas”, which has become somewhat of a hymn against men, was the song that sky-rocketed Paquita to fame. After this song went public, she went from singing at bars in the popular Mexico City neighborhood ‘Guerrero’, and moved on to perform on stages internationally.

Paquita’s life has been far from easy, and her story has been turned into a bio-series by Imagen Televisión.

credit Instagram @paquitaoficialb

Paquita is an idol for many Latino women who were touched by her words. But her life wasn’t always so glamorous. The singer’s life has already been immortalized in a bio-series broadcasted by Imagen Televisión. Through the series, we found out that she married a 42-year-old man when she was just fifteen. She had two children with him only to find out that the ‘rata de dos patas’ had been cheating on him all along and had another family in a different town. Her love life has clearly not been as successful as her career —which is true of a lot of women in many different industries. The singer, however, is now an artist consolidated as one of the most famous feminist performers Mexico has ever seen.