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Latino Artists Killing It At This Year’s Art Basel In Miami

Sometimes Art Basel can be overshadowed by the beautiful people and ?parties?, but if you want to take a little break from the sun, tequila and guest lists, here are some Latino artists you can catch at this year’s Art Basel – so you know, you can actually say you saw some art.

Pedro&Juana

If in LA go see these floaters at the #hammer #pedroyjuana

A photo posted by Pedro&Juana (@pedroyjuana) on


Mexico City based design firm Pedro&Juana, founded by Ana Paula Ruiz Galindo and Mecky Reuss, are presenting “Sobremesa,” an interactive installation inspired by the Latino tradition of lingering and talking with friends and family at the dinner table, post-meal. As a collaboration with Airbnb, the installation will consist of a transparent house structure with a courtyard, which will transform as the week goes on, to symbolize how homes and people change when they are shared.

Design/Miami Art Fair, Nov 30-Dec 4

Sangree

Hoy inauguramos Piedra Temporal en @saladeartepublicosiqueiros ??

A photo posted by SANGREE (@sangree_oficial) on


Sangree is a collective of Mexican artists, Rene Godinez Pozas and Carlos Lara. They recently debuted their Unclassified Site Museum installation in downtown Denver, so there’s a good chance that whatever work they have planned during the 12 Hours of NAAFI party during Basel is going to be rad. ?

Red Bull Academy Presents 12 Hours of NAAFI, Dec. 1, 21+

Narciso Rodriguez


The Narciso Rodriguez: An Exercise in Minimalism exhibit at Frost Art Museum is the perfect stop for those fashion lovers out there who want to bask in the work of one of the most influential Latino fashion designers in history. The exhibit is co-curated by Elle Magazine’s Creative Director, Alex Gonzalez, and features over 40 garments and purses that will make you drool. Bring mami or take your boo to drop some hints for Christmas gift ideas.

Frost Art Museum, Oct. 16- Jan. 8, 2017

José Parlá

A photo posted by José Parlá (@joseparla) on


Miami-bred-Brooklyn-residing Cuban artist José Parlá is coming back to his hometown for a special exhibit with YoungArts titled, Roots. The artist, whose work is featured at landmarks like One World Trade Center, writes of his inspiration for Roots, “No matter where we come from, in this country as in many other melting pots around the globe, throughout our shared histories, migrations, and immigration, mixed race roots contribute to the fiber of the beauty that is humanity.” Free admission and free to the public!

YoungArts Foundation, Nov. 29- Dec. 15

Alex Yanes

Fountain of youth ??

A photo posted by Alex Yanes (@alexyanes) on


Miami-based artist Alex Yanes is known for his vibrant, whimsical mixed-media pieces, and you’ll have plenty of chances to check out some of his newest work. He’ll have his work at the Thinkspace booth at Scope Art Fair and will reveal a massive mural installation as part of Juxtapoz Magazine’s Art Basel takeover in Wynwood.

Juxtapoz Clubhouse, Dec. 1-Dec. 4

Dasic Fernandez


Wynwood Walls are a Miami art institution and are always holding it down for local artists, above all. Dasic Fernandez will be one of the artists unveiled during the new collection of murals on Nov. 29. He credits street graffiti and South American culture as his biggest influences.

Wynwood Walls, Nov. 30-Dec 1

Paulo Nazareth


Paulo Nazareth is one of 12 Brazilian artists who will be showcased at the Rubbell Family Collection’s exhibit, New Shamans/Novos Xamãs. Nazareth’s work is known for its commentary on race and class struggle in his native Brazil and South America as a whole.

RFC Museum, Nov. 30

Aaron De La Cruz


Aaron de la Cruz’s signature minimal, yet intricate, work will be on display during a special pop-up shop with iconic fashion brand, Maison Margiela. He will be painting a live installation during the event.

MM6 Pop-up, Nov. 29, RSVP only

Brujas and Venus X


While not technically art, badass Bronx all-female skate crew Brujas is partnering with Future Archives and Skate Free for a sweet party at Lot 22 Skate Park during Art Basel. The Brujas will be leading the skate session and NYC DJ Venus X will be providing the sounds, so this could be a really good spot to hang out and chill with some good people before your next party.

Lot 22 Skate Park, RSVP, Dec. 3

Diana Garcia

Bison’s medicine includes manifestation, protection, earth creativity, feminine courage, abundance, knowledge, generosity, hospitality, sharing work, courage, strength, challenge, survival, giving for the greater good, formulating beneficial plans. That´s the medicine our brothers and sisters from the Sioux tribe are carrying defending OUR water. Thank you, thank you, thank you??✨?? Grateful for their example of protest. It´s how we all should deal with the multiple challenges we´re experiencing around the world these days. Speaking out loud with love, in peace, from our hearts. Mother will guide us if we listen, she wants us to be present and aware of how we react, letting our emotions on a side, but standing strong. It´s time to change things inside us, so they can be manifested like a healing twirling Rainbow all around. We are the Rainbow Warriors. It´s our time✨ I’ll be donating the $ from these prints, so get yours and support the cause. For details, email me at: info@bewhatyoudream.com #defendthesacred #standingrock #nodapl #waterislife #ichoosemagic #bewhatyoudream

A photo posted by Diana Garcia (@imdianagarcia) on


Diana Garcia is a Mexican artist and actress currently living in Los Angeles. For Art Basel, the trendy hotel Freehand Miami will be hosting a night of Mexican art, at which she will unveil her newest mural. To keep on theme, there will be a pop-up taco truck and Don Julio tequila flowing. This sounds like a perfect night.

Freehand Miami, Dec. 1


READ: This Queer Immigration Activist Is Pushing The Boundaries Of Brown LGBTQ Art

Plan on going to Art Basel this year? Which artists/parties do you have your eye on?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

A Florida Doctor Is Being Charged with a Hate Crime After Assaulting a Latino Man at a Supermarket

Things That Matter

A Florida Doctor Is Being Charged with a Hate Crime After Assaulting a Latino Man at a Supermarket

Photos via MIAMI-DADE CORRECTIONS, Getty Images

It’s an unfortunate reality that Latinos face immense amounts of racism in America. Case in point: a Florida doctor is facing hate crime charges after assaulting a Latino man at a supermarket.

According to police, a 58-year-old woman followed a Latino man out to the parking lot, keyed his car, smashed his phone, and punched him–all the while hurling racially-charged insults at him.

The altercation happened on Jan. 20th at a Publix supermarket in Hialeah, Florida–a town with a large Latino population. It all started when the victim, an unnamed Latino man, asked Dr. Jennifer Susan Wright to maintain social distancing in Spanish. After she ignored him, the man repeated the question in English.

It was at this point that Dr. Wright, who is an anesthesiologist at Mount Sinai Medical Center, became incensed and began muttering curse words under her breath. After the man left the grocery store, Dr. Wright followed him out to the parking lot.

She began to verbally berate him, calling him a “spic” and telling him “we should have gotten rid of you when we could.”

According to the police report, she also said: “This is not going to be Biden’s America, this is my America.” The woman then took her keys out an began to “stab the victim’s vehicle with her keys” while telling him to “go back to his country”.

The man took out his phone to call 911 and the woman allegedly punched him, causing him to drop his phone. When he bent over to pick his phone up, she allegedly kicked him and tried to stomp on his phone.

The woman fled before the police came, but she was arrested on Feb 12th at her home in Miami Springs.

The woman was initially charged with tampering with a victim, criminal mischief and battery with prejudice. The “hate crime” charge was later added, elevating the crime to a felony.

According to reports, Wright posted her $1000 bail and is now awaiting trial. Mount Sinai Medical Center released a statement saying that Dr. Wright is “no longer responsible for patient care” after assaulting a Latino man.

According to the Miami Herald, neighbors know Dr. Jennifer Wright as an ardent Trump supporter. Her social media pages are riddled with far-right, Pro-Trump memes and photos of her posing in a MAGA hat. She even uploaded a post that read: “It’s Okay To Be White.”

We can all agree that it’s “okay” to be white. It’s okay to be any race. We cannot, however, all agree that it’s okay to be a violent, racist bigot. We hope the victim has recovered and we hope Jennifer Wright will face justice.

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These Terrariums And Fairy Gardens Are A Lil’ Homies Dream Come True

Culture

These Terrariums And Fairy Gardens Are A Lil’ Homies Dream Come True

Lil’ Homies are one toy that we all remember. They little figurines were so much more to us than little toys that we got from toy vending machines. Adrian Ortiz is using them to create something magical and giving people a non-Eurocentric take on terrariums.

Adrian Ortiz is giving Lil’ Homies their own terrariums in which to flourish.

Ortiz understands the cultural importance of Lil’ Homies because it was one of the first times he saw himself represented, like so many of us. The toys were a welcomed moment of representation for Ortiz after spending so many years seeing so many white narratives in the media and toys.

“I started making terrariums with Lil’ Homies in them as the figures because I noticed how traditional fairy gardens were always representing white/European figures,” Ortiz told mitú. “I thought about how perfect they were in size. I wanted to dedicate my art page to the idea of people of color existing and participating in nature.”

Ortiz feels supported from his followers as well as his boyfriend. His art has been a welcomed breath of culturally relevant plant art in people’s social media feeds.

The ongoing pandemic gave Ortiz a chance to dive deeper into a hobby he already had: plants.

“I have always been into plants and nature since I was a kid and I began making terrariums and fairy gardens in the past year to deal with the pandemic like so many others,” Ortiz says. “There is something super special about making miniature tiny living worlds. I wanted to make fairy gardens but I ended up with something halfway between terrariums and fairy gardens but with cholos. So I created the ‘Brown People Indoor Miniature Gardening TikTok’ series on my tik tok account.”

Ortiz’s TikTok account, aptly named @botanical_homie, has more than 7,000 followers showing that people are really into the idea of Lil’ Homies living their fairy garden dreams.

The terrariums are another chance for people of color to be represented in the world.

Ortiz was in an arts school for middle and high school. In that time, the school fostered an understanding of racial injustices and introduced Ortiz to the concept of artivism, art as activism. It was, according to Ortiz, a moment when he realized that he wanted to dedicate his art to BIPOC.

“I grew up and live in Colorado and have seen the lack of access BIPOC have to outdoor activities like hiking and mountain climbing,” Ortiz explains. “These are white-dominated sports and activities that some POC never get to experience. I want to create a world where we can be anything and do everything, even if it’s miniature. A utopia for us to take back what is also ours.”

Ortiz is making the terrariums for everyone, even people who struggle to take care of plants.

Covid quarantining has forced so many people to think they make perfect plant parents. Yet, taking care of plants is something that doesn’t com naturally. Ortiz had to spend time trying to figure out what plants are the best for everyone.

“Part of my challenge in creating these terrariums has been figuring out what kind of plants people can keep alive. They all have different requirements so getting plants should always depend on your space and lighting,” Ortiz says. “I come from the generation of YouTube so I always say do research, it’s part of the fun. The biggest thing about having plants that people don’t realize is that you just have to pay attention to them, often. But again it depends, some plants are indestructible.”

Ortiz is happy to be able to create this art and hopes to make them more accessible.

“If you want to support me and my art work you can contact me via Instagram about commissions,” Ortiz says. “Shipping these pieces is not easy or ideal so I appreciate everyone’s patience as I learn and evolve. My goal is to work on larger installations and I’ll be putting out DIY kits in the near future.”

READ: If You Call Yourself A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Should Be Following These Five Artists

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