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Here’s How Likely A Massive Deportation Is In The Upcoming Months

As of today, the U.S. is facing the possibility that 2 million to 3 million immigrants could be immediately deported under the new administration. During a speech in August, Donald Trump explained to followers that there are, “…criminal aliens now inside of our country, 2 million people, criminal aliens.” The process of deportation has been described, on Donald Trump’s personal website, as a “day one” operation, that will be enabled by “local, state, and federal law enforcement.”

Sounds like a big number, but it’s not entirely true.

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As Fox News reported, “criminal aliens” are “criminal and have criminal records, gang, members, drug dealers.” While 2 million to 3 million sound like a lot, the number of “criminal aliens” is around 900,000, according to data analysis from the Migration Policy Institute. That number that was independently backed up by the Pew Research Center. This amount is obviously far less than the estimated 3 million, cited by Trump. So what this means is that the word “criminal” could be reinterpreted to make sure that including the 900k “criminal alien” immigrants facing deportation, we could expect another 1.1. to 2.1 million people to be removed from this country, even if they are not “criminal aliens” under the current definition of the word.

Misconceptions about immigrants.

I wish there was a way we could bridge the gap ?#solidarity #reallives #realissues #unitedwedream

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As of 2014, there were nearly 11 million immigrants living in the U.S., with the majority of them living in California, Texas, Florida, New York, New Jersey and Illinois. According to the Pew Research Center, the number of immigrants coming to this country has leveled off over the last few years, and those who live here are less likely to commit crimes.

Nearly 52 percent of our country’s immigrants come from Mexico, and according to Politifact, “Mexican men ages 18 to 39, the incarceration rate in 2010 was 2.8 percent, compared to 10.7 percent for native-born men in the same age group.”

The reasons for this are fairly obvious, most immigrants are here to build a “better life” and do not want to risk getting deported for committing a minor offense. They also contribute to nearly 5 percent of the total working force of the United States, and are still outnumbered in all jobs by U.S. citizens.

So, will deportation really happen?


Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan told CNN that President-elect Donald Trump is “not planning on erecting a deportation force.” He went further to reassure citizens that mass deportation is not as important as border security. However, one thing that we can’t take for granted is the fact that immigration was always one of the core elements that defined Trump’s campaign. If he expects to get re-elected, Trump is going to have to deliver on his promises.

What can immigrants do?


If immigrants are afraid of being targeted by authorities — or worse — yeah, they could leave the country and give satisfaction to the people who feel immigration is driving our country’s demise. But that option isn’t realistic and accomplishes nothing anyway. It won’t fix the anger of deportation proponents, and it offers two ugly halves of the same coin: Living in a constant state of fear or proactively upending your life. Another option could be to find the nearest “Sanctuary City” and hope that Trump doesn’t pull funding on that city. If those options seem grim and angst-ridden, it’s because they are. So seek out positive outcomes by aligning with advocacy organizations.

If you or someone you know is concerned about their future in this country, please look into the many organizations we need right now.

?We will get through this! ✊❤ #heretostay

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Those include United We Dream, Border Angels, National Network For Immigrant And Refugee Rights, and many others. Please do your own research on this matter and look at the links below for more information.


Read: As Immigration From Mexico Declines, Other Nationalities Are Moving In

[H/T] Remezcla: Feeling Helpless After Trump’s Win? Here Are 10 Organizations You Can Support

[H/T] Latino Rebels: How I Prepared Latino and Muslim ESL Students for the Trump Presidency

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A Mexican Beauty Queen Has Landed In Jail On Kidnapping Charges, Why Does This Keep Happening?

Culture

A Mexican Beauty Queen Has Landed In Jail On Kidnapping Charges, Why Does This Keep Happening?

The pageant world is popular in communities all over the planet. From Russia to the U.S. and across Latin America, beauty queens (and kings) strut their stuff on runways and display their many talents. But the pageant world is also known to suffer from a more sinister side that often lands itself in the headlines.

In Mexico, beauty pageants have long been connected to organized crime and international human trafficking rings. Now, one former beauty queen has landed herself in jail in connection to these terrible crimes.

A former Mexican beauty queen has been jailed in connection to a kidnapping ring.

A former Oaxaca beauty queen has been jailed without bail on suspicion of being part of a kidnapping ring operating in the Mexican states of Veracruz and Oaxaca.

Laura Mojica Romero, 25, was Miss Oaxaca in 2018 and the 2020 International Queen of Coffee in Colombia, a beauty pageant at which she represented Mexico. She was arrested Thursday with seven other people in a raid conducted by a federal anti-kidnapping unit after two months of investigation.

A judge on Saturday ruled that Mojica and the seven others will remain in prison for the next two months while authorities continue to gather evidence. Members of the group each face up to 50 years in prison.

Romero had tried to position herself as unique among beauty queens in the country.

Laura Mojica Romero defined herself as “more than a pretty face” during a interview she did in 2019. The 25-year-old, who at that time had just won the Miss Oaxaca contest for the second time, said that the contest had taken an important turn because it highlighted aspects that went “beyond” the contestants’ own beauty.

She put herself out there as an example when remembering that she participated in the delivery of supplies (sweaters, blankets and coats) in remote Indigenous communities and announced that among her future projects included support for the musical education of children from impoverished communities, as well as the formation of women’s entrepreneurship cells; a strategy that she claimed was to combat gender violence.

“We cannot stand idly by, we have to eradicate violence against women, through campaigns and talks that make men aware of this problem,” said the also graduate in Business Administration from the Universidad Veracruzana (UV) to Newsweek Mexico.

Mexico is an international hub for human trafficking.

In its most recent report, the organization Alto al Secuestro warned that the states with the highest incidence of kidnappings are the State of Mexico, with seven; Veracruz, with 12; Oaxaca, with six; Guerrero, with five; and Tabasco, Sinaloa and Mexico City, with four respectively.

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Alejandro Mayorkas Is The First Latino And Immigrant To Be Named Secretary Of The Department Of Homeland Security

Things That Matter

Alejandro Mayorkas Is The First Latino And Immigrant To Be Named Secretary Of The Department Of Homeland Security

Alejandro Mayorkas is the first Latino and the first immigrant to lead the Department of Homeland Security. Mayorkas is Cuban-born and was one of the original architects of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Alejandro Mayorkas is the first Latino and immigrant to be confirmed as the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

Secretary Mayorkas is inheriting a Trump-era DHS and is immediately getting to work to rectify issues that the Biden administration has highlighted. Two of the most pressing issues are heading up a task force to reunite migrant families who were separated by the previous administration and reviewing the “Remain in Mexico” policy.

“Remain in Mexico” is a policy that the Trump administration created and enforced that sent migrants to Mexico to await their asylum cases. The policy has been criticized both by U.S. and international politicians as a humanitarian issue.

It isn’t Mayorkas’ first time working for DHS.

Sec. Mayorkas was the deputy secretary of DHS from December 2013 – October 2016 under President Barack Obama. During that time, Mayorkas was crucial in responding to the 2013 – 14 Ebola virus epidemic and 2015 – 16 Zika virus epidemic. Mayorkas is ready to come back to the department and to bring back what he sees are the department’s mission.

“DHS bears an extraordinary weight on behalf of the American people, the weight of grave challenges seen and unseen,” Sec. Mayorkas said in a statement. “It is the greatest privilege of my life to return to the Department to lead the men and women who dedicate their talent and energy to the safety and security of our nation. I will work every day to ensure that they have the tools they need to execute their missions with honor and integrity. The mission of the Department of Homeland Security is to safeguard the American people, our homeland, and our values. The United States is a welcoming and empathetic nation, one that finds strength in its diversity. I pledge to defend and secure our country without sacrificing these American values.”

Mayorkas is no stranger to working on America’s immigration system.

Mayorkas is one of the original architects of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), which is at stake because of the previous administration. The Biden administration has made a promise to preserve DACA and to create a pathway to citizenship to the 11 million undocumented people living in the U.S.

President Biden has introduced legislation to reform the current immigration system. The legislation has a timeframe for all undocumented people in the U.S. to become citizens if they follow certains steps and meet certain criteria.

While Mayorkas got bipartisan support in the Senate confirmation, some Republicans did not like his work in immigration. Sen. Marco Rubio, a fellow Cuban, voted to opposed Mayorkas.

“Not only has Mayorkas pledged to undo the sensible protections put in place by the Trump Administration that ended the dangerous policy of catch and release, but his nomination is further evidence that the Biden Administration intends to pursue a radical immigration agenda,” Sen. Rubio said in a statement.

READ: President Biden Introduces Legislation To Create Pathway To Citizenship For 11 Million Undocumented People

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