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Have You Noticed How Many Mexican Phrases Use The Word ‘Madre’?

Mexicans really love their mothers, don’t they? We love ‘em so much that we’ve found a way to include the word “madre” in, like, 300 different phrases. OK, maybe not that many, but it’s def waaaay more than you realized. So madre meaning is…. check it:

***WARNING: This post contains strong language***

“Tu Madre”

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Literal translation: Your mother.
What it really means: It’s kinda like “your mama,” but in Spanish.
Example: “¿Me estás llamando fea? ¡Tu madre!”
How it would sound in English: “Are you calling me ugly? Your mother!”


“P**a Madre”

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Literal translation: Whore mother.
What it really means: Depends on context, really, but it’s usually used to express frustration.
Example: “Puta madre, the teacher gave us a pop quiz!”
How it would sound in English: “Whore mother, the teacher gave us a pop quiz!”


“Hija De Tu Chingada Madre/Chingada Madre”

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Literal translation: Daughter of a screwed mother.
What it really means: Effed mother. Variation of “Puta Madre.” Another way of expressing frustration.
Example: “Chingada madre, I got all the way to the store and forgot my wallet.”
How it would sound in English: “Daughter of a screwed mother, I got all the way to the store and forgot my wallet.”


“Chinga Tu Madre”

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Literal translation: Screw your mother.
What it really means: Eff your mother.
Example: “¡Chinga tu madre, guey!”
How it would sound in English: “Screw your mother, ox!”


“A Toda Madre”

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Literal translation: At all mother.
What it really means: Totally awesome.
How it sounds in Spanish: “¡Esa fiesta estuvo a toda madre!”
How it would sound in English: “That party was at all mother!”


“Con Madre”

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Literal translation: With mother.
What it really means: Awesome.
Example: “El baile está con madre!”
How it would sound in English: “This dance is with mother!”


“A La Madre”

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Literal translation: To the mother.
What it really means: Another one that depends on the context, but usually it’s used to express surprise or frustration.
Example: “Los planes se fueron a la madre y estoy hasta la madre con ellos de todos modos.”
How it would sound in English: “The plans went to the mother and I’m up to the mother with them anyway.”


“Me Vale Madre”

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Literal translation: It’s worth mother to me.
What it really means: I don’t give a sh*t. 
Example: “Me vale madre si la hice enojar.”
How it would sound in English: “It’s worth mother to me if I made her mad.”


“Ni Madres”

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Literal translation: No mothers.
What it really means: No way.
Example: “Ni madres quiero salir con tu primo! “
How it would sound in English: “No mothers I want to go out with your cousin!”


“No Tienes Madre”

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Literal translation: You have no mother.
What it really means: You have no shame/scruples/sense.
Example: “Te acabaste toda la cerveza, no tienes madre.”
How it would sound in English: “You finished all the beer, you have no mother.”


“Desmadre”

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Literal translation: Nothing quite captures it, but it’s like “unmothered.”
What it really means: Pandemonium (good or bad, depending on context).
Example: “Vives como un puerco, esta casa es un desmadre.”
How it would sound in English: “You live like a pig, this house is an unmothered.”


“Madrazo”

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Literal translation: There is none! It’s like a “big mother,” but not really.
What it really means: A hit, a punch, a crash.
Example: “Me dieron un madrazo en la cara con una chancla.”
How it would sound in English: “They gave me a big mother on the face with a flip-flop.”


“Partir La Madre”

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Literal translation: Split the mother.
What it really means: Kick your ass.  
Example: “Te voy a partir la madre.”
How it would sound in English: “I’m going to split your mother.”


“Poca Madre”

Credit: generadormemes.com

Literal translation: Little mother.
What it really means: Someone or something that sucks. 
Example: “Sólo una persona con poca madre haría eso.”
How it would sound in English: “Only a person with little mother would do that.”


READ: 13 Mexican Sayings That Sound Really Weird When They’re Translated Literally

What’s your favorite slang featuring the word “mother”? Click on the share button below to send to your friends!

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Yalitza Aparicio Has Landed Her First Role Since “Roma” And We Cannot Wait

Entertainment

Yalitza Aparicio Has Landed Her First Role Since “Roma” And We Cannot Wait

For fans of Yalitza Aparicio from the now iconic film Roma, we have been waiting almost three years to know what’s next for the Oscar-nominated actress. And now, we finally have some answers.

The Roma actress is set to star in an upcoming horror film that’s already started filming.

Anyone who saw Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma immediately fell in love with Cleo, the character played by Oscar-nominated actress Yalitza Aparicio. Her award-winning part in Roma was her very first acting gig and despite her success, she hasn’t acted in anything since, until now.

Aparicio is set to star in an upcoming horror film Presences, a horror film from Innocent Voices director Luis Mandoki. As reported by Mexican publication El Universal, production on Aparicio’s second feature kicked off this week in Tlalpujahua in central Mexico.

According to El Universal: “The film tells the story of a man who loses his wife and goes to seclude himself in a cabin in the woods, where strange things happen.” Production in Tlalpujahua is expected to last for a month.

Although this is only her second role, Aparicio has kept herself busy with several projects.

Aparicio was a schoolteacher plucked from obscurity to star in “Roma,” which resulted in her becoming the first Mexican woman to be Oscar nominated for Best Actress in 14 years and the first Indigenous woman in history. And her Indigenous identity is a major part of her career.

While “Presences” marks the first movie Aparicio has taken on since “Roma,” the actress has remained busy over the last two years, including supporting Indigenous film community efforts in Mexico.

The actress has teamed with projects such as Cine Too to help extend access to cinema to marginalized communities. Cine Too is a one-screen, 75-seat cinema in Guelatao de Juárez, Oaxaca that serves as an educational center for the next generation of Indigenous filmmakers.

“It’s important to save these spaces because they reach places where the arts are often not accessible,” Aparicio told IndieWire. “I come from a community where there’s no movie theater, and as a consequence the population, especially the children that grow up those communities, has less of an interest in the cinematic arts. [Cine Too] has the possibility to reach these children and provide an opportunity to instill in them the passion for cinema and teach them about this art form.”

Aparicio continued, “My objective in my career is to give visibility to all of us who have been kept in the dark for so long. The acting projects I’m working on are moving slowly because I’m putting all my efforts in not being pigeonholed because of my appearance. There are many people who have the disposition to help change things. We’ve had enough of people being typecast in certain roles or characters based on the color of their skin. We have a complicated job, because these things can’t be changed overnight but hopefully we can show people that the only limits are within us.”

“Wherever I go, I’ll always be proudly representing our Indigenous communities,” the actress concluded. “I’m conscious that every step I take may open doors for someone else and at the same time it’s an opportunity for society to realize we are part of it and that we are here.”

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A Mexican Beauty Queen Has Landed In Jail On Kidnapping Charges, Why Does This Keep Happening?

Culture

A Mexican Beauty Queen Has Landed In Jail On Kidnapping Charges, Why Does This Keep Happening?

The pageant world is popular in communities all over the planet. From Russia to the U.S. and across Latin America, beauty queens (and kings) strut their stuff on runways and display their many talents. But the pageant world is also known to suffer from a more sinister side that often lands itself in the headlines.

In Mexico, beauty pageants have long been connected to organized crime and international human trafficking rings. Now, one former beauty queen has landed herself in jail in connection to these terrible crimes.

A former Mexican beauty queen has been jailed in connection to a kidnapping ring.

A former Oaxaca beauty queen has been jailed without bail on suspicion of being part of a kidnapping ring operating in the Mexican states of Veracruz and Oaxaca.

Laura Mojica Romero, 25, was Miss Oaxaca in 2018 and the 2020 International Queen of Coffee in Colombia, a beauty pageant at which she represented Mexico. She was arrested Thursday with seven other people in a raid conducted by a federal anti-kidnapping unit after two months of investigation.

A judge on Saturday ruled that Mojica and the seven others will remain in prison for the next two months while authorities continue to gather evidence. Members of the group each face up to 50 years in prison.

Romero had tried to position herself as unique among beauty queens in the country.

Laura Mojica Romero defined herself as “more than a pretty face” during a interview she did in 2019. The 25-year-old, who at that time had just won the Miss Oaxaca contest for the second time, said that the contest had taken an important turn because it highlighted aspects that went “beyond” the contestants’ own beauty.

She put herself out there as an example when remembering that she participated in the delivery of supplies (sweaters, blankets and coats) in remote Indigenous communities and announced that among her future projects included support for the musical education of children from impoverished communities, as well as the formation of women’s entrepreneurship cells; a strategy that she claimed was to combat gender violence.

“We cannot stand idly by, we have to eradicate violence against women, through campaigns and talks that make men aware of this problem,” said the also graduate in Business Administration from the Universidad Veracruzana (UV) to Newsweek Mexico.

Mexico is an international hub for human trafficking.

In its most recent report, the organization Alto al Secuestro warned that the states with the highest incidence of kidnappings are the State of Mexico, with seven; Veracruz, with 12; Oaxaca, with six; Guerrero, with five; and Tabasco, Sinaloa and Mexico City, with four respectively.

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