Entertainment

9 Times “Jane The Virgin” Got Latino Culture Right

Let’s talk about “Jane the Virgin,” shall we?

It’s so refreshing and wonderful to see Latino culture represented accurately on a television screen. And “Jane the Virgin” is actually a really damn good show — it kind of feels like you’re watching your own family saga. (Only, of course, slightly more telenovelishly.)


On that note, here are nine times that “Jane the Virgin” got Latino culture right:


1. Jane’s abuela speaks only Spanish.

Credit: CW

I grew up in a Puerto Rican household, and my abuelo and abuela never spoke English. In fact, my abuelo called all of my sisters “linda,” because it was easier than saying our names. The fact that Jane’s grandmother only speaks Spanish on the show and that we, as English-dominant viewers, understand her is a great touch to the show.


2. The show features an ever-evolving view of Catholicism.

Credit: CW

If you’re Latino, there’s a fairly good chance you grew up Catholic. And if you are, you know that your grandparents are likely very, very Catholic, your parents are you know, good Catholics, and… well, and then there’s us. The Janes. We’re the kids of super-Catholic Latinos, but for us, it’s changing, we’re not as old-school as those before us. “Jane the Virgin” totally gets that.


3. Jane has a strong AF mother.

Credit: CW

If there’s one thing that’s true about Latino culture, it’s the strong AF women. “Jane the Virgin” is a show that is full of badass, opinionated, hardworking ladies. The Villanueva women alone are the type to make you raise your hands in praise. Watching the show, it’s totally relatable to many Latino families.


4. There’s a real flare for the dramatic.

Credit: CW

LOL, should we all just send this GIF to our entire families, particularly the tías? If you’re part of a Latino family, you know that with drama in families comes the denial of drama. How is it that the most dramatic of people are the ones who deny it the hardest?!


5. There’s the one family member who takes over the spotlight at every single get-together.

Credit: CW

(Not gonna lie, this person is usually me.) There’s always that one family member at birthday parties and quinceañeras who just takes over the mic and ~Works. It. Out.~ But hey, that’s what makes Latino families so fun, right?!


6. It deals with the struggles of being a single mom without the stereotypes we’re used to seeing about Latinas.

Credit: CW

The amazing thing about “Jane the Virgin” is that it deals with real issues — like Latinas as single mothers — in a way that is honest, poignant, and inspiring, while showing Jane as being both vulnerable and empowered. It’s not cliché, which makes it so relatable. Part of the reason “Jane the Virgin” is such a success is because so many of us can identify with it. In the Villanueva women, we see our mothers, sisters, cousins and friends.


7. It’s not about a Latino family in a white-dominated place.

Credit: CW

Let’s talk about Miami, baby! In the past, when a Latino family is represented in a TV show or movie, they are usually the only Latinos around. Not in this show — and that’s why it’s so brilliant. There are Latinos everywhere, and not in the stereotypical roles we’re used to seeing. It feels more natural as an audience member because that’s how it is in real life.


8. Family tradition takes center stage.

Credit: CW

Ugh, this speech and this moment forever. Tradition in Latino families is a big deal! From weddings to holidays, tradition can speak volumes and has a very important role in a Latino household. Pretty sure we all burst into tears when Jane reads the letter her mom read at her baptism. It’s so personal, and we can all feel it!


9. Everything becomes a family event.

Credit: CW

With a Latino family, it’s never not a family thing that involves everyone. This might be the most accurate to Latino culture.

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So, here’s to a show that actually gets it right: praise hand emojis for everyone!


Are you a fan of Jane the Virgin? What’s your favorite part about the show? mitú wants to know!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Latinas Are Sharing Their Most Treasured Memories Of Their Abuelos And It’s Exactly What We Needed This Month

Fierce

Latinas Are Sharing Their Most Treasured Memories Of Their Abuelos And It’s Exactly What We Needed This Month

Buda Mendes / Getty

When it comes to celebrating our Latinidad, there’s no denying that Latinos need much more than a month to celebrate our accomplishments, cultures, and contributions. Still, since 1988, people across the country have used Hispanic Heritage Month to commemorate the contributions of Latin Americans in the United States. This month, just like every other month, we’re recognizing and celebrating our Latinidad by sharing stories and moments from our followers.

Recently we asked Latinas on FIERCE to share their memories of some of the most influential Latinos in their lives: their abuelos.

Check out their sweet stories below.

“Ayy mis abuelos; I truly believe they were my soulmates. So many favorite memories. From my grandpa waking up early to start praying and writing his devotionals, to them sitting on the back swing HE MADE praying the rosary, playing backyard baseball with him & my cousins, my grandma sitting outside watching while croquets, watching novelas with her, they were the loves of my life, the sunshine my soul always needed to be happy….I’ll never trade any of my amazing moments with them. My angels; Catalina y Felipe Sustaita.” –melannram

“My abuelito passed away almost 10 years ago now, he was sick ever since I could remember so I was never able to make memories with him. Earlier this year I got to visit the rancho in MX where he raised my dad and tios. A little back story, I have this belief and connection to white butterflies. Whenever I see them or they cross my path I am convinced it’s my abuelito telling me that he’s near or watching over me🤎 anyways, on our way to the ranchito which I had only visited once before when I was about 4, we were guided by these hand sized white butterflies, it was absolutely beautiful. My abuelito really lead us to his casita in the rancho. I could feel his presence and happiness that his grandchildren had the opportunity to visit his home 🤎 this is my favorite memory, this is the memory that I cherish,
– a memory that brings me joy.” –sandra_larios

“Seeing my grandpa make my grandma a cocktail when she came home from a long day at work. He would leave her cocktail for her on the kitchen counter, so it was the first thing she’d see when she walked through the door. They taught me it isn’t always grand gestures, but a lot of the small ones that count.allimae2011

“My abuela started losing her memory early on but she always remembered the story of how she met our Abo until the day she passed. I was the type of kid that kind of resisted learning spanish, but hearing her tell those stories in her beautiful Puerto Rican accent made me fall in love with the language in a way I had never before. I owe my love of spanish and story telling to her. She was a wonderful story teller and I’ll always hold the fondest memories of sitting in her terraza with her 70s furniture, drinking cafecito, and talking about the man who made her fall head over heels in love.” –
alfonsina_mj

“Hearing them talk in the kitchen, drinking their coffee while listening to boleros.”- mel_aguirre1

“Making homemade tortillas with my ama.” – alwaysdulcee

“My Cuban 🇨🇺 Abuelitos riding in the back seat of their Mercedes and watching Abuelo open the door for Abuela every time. My Mexican 🇲🇽 side was making tortillas with Abuela and Abuelo teaching me to drive his truck. At 7 years old!” – brigittecasaus

“Making tamales for us just because.” – angierivera4265

“Cruising with my grandpa, building a studio with grandpa, changing the oil, tire, battery and learning to pump gas with grandpa. But my favorite one, him teaching me to read a clock with a song.” – 2ev37

“Meeting my grandma for the first time when she came to visit us in the US. I was 4 years old! It was so exciting because I would only speak to her in the phone and to finally meet her was a blessing. She was such an amazing lady ! She passed away 7 years ago. I wished she and I could of seen each other more often.” –_lizzylivvy28

“I would sit down on the little old sofa in our living room with my abuelito. He would tell me stories about him when we was younger. I always loved it when he would tell me the story about how he met my abuelita.” –
emigandar

“My grandparents weren’t together anymore, but they we’re 2 special people. My grandpa would always call at the crack of dawn on my birthday. I hated it as a kid, but loved it as an adult. And I’ve missed them the last few years of his life. My grandma would make our birthday cards and send them via mail. When we’d get them they would always be different. I miss those A LOT. They were always personalized and she knew details about the things I was going through so she made them specific to that. It was so special the little things they did for us. We lost my grandma 7 years ago and my grandpa a year ago in July.” –e_bonita89

“They raised me so having coffee with both of them. Eating watermelon with my grandpa and then reading together. Watching old movies together then taking naps. My grandma and I love watching novelas and then talk about them. I still walk with her to 26th street (little Village) or to our nearest aldi.” –melyssa.1997

“Mi abuela used to wake me up on weekends. She would enter the room singing “buenos días su señoría mantantirulirula”. She used to give me a hair brush, and while she was opening the window she would say “brush your hair hija, so the sleep will go away. I opened the window for it to go”. I would brush my hair and convince myself that I got rid of my sleepiness. My grandma is 90 now, and she’s still magic like this.” – iamevyi

“In 7th grade I missed the bus, and I hated missing school, and I cried the entire day because I was scared my parents were going to yell at me, and my grandma stopped my dad before he came in and told him what happened and how it was her fault I missed the bus, because she accidentally unplugged my alarm, even though it wasn’t true.”-
tinnaafaceee

“When my daughter was 6, I took her to visit my grandparents in Mexico. We arrived to the airport at night. It was crowded, a little disoriented, my baby seemed nervous as we were going through customs & she asked me “what if Grandpa can’t find us?”, Just then I saw movement through the large window ahead of us, it was my Abuelito, elbowing his way through the crowd, waving and smiling at us. He was always there when I needed him.” –magpieinaz

“Abuelos? Don’t have them. (Bad joke) They passed before I ever got to meet them. My parents never really talk about them, I think it’s too painful. I often wonder if there are any traits I have from them or if I do anything that my parents might say, oh she got that from my mom/dad. I’m happy my son has all 4 grandparents; I take a billion pictures of him with them.” –_nancysalto

melannramAyy mis abuelos; I truly believe they were my soulmates. So many favorite memories. From my grandpa waking up early to start praying and writing his devotionals, to them sitting on the back swing HE MADE praying the rosary, playing backyard baseball with him & my cousins, my grandma sitting outside watching while croquets, watching novelas with her, they were the loves of my life, the sunshine my soul always needed to be happy….I’ll never trade any of my amazing moments with them. My angels; Catalina y Felipe Sustaita ❤️

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

This Is A Story All About How A Viral Youtube Video Became The Next ‘Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’

Entertainment

This Is A Story All About How A Viral Youtube Video Became The Next ‘Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’

NBC

That’s right the 90s classic starring Will Smith is being flipped-turned upside down into a dramatic television series.

You might remember a year ago when a creative YouTube trailer of a dramatic version of the beloved series “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” went viral. When the original trailer first came out, fans could not stop talking about the accurate POV the series presented of the original NBC comedy. The fresh trailer clipped out the goofy and playful nature that a young Will Smith presented in the original series and revealed a much more dramatic reimagining of the series about a street-wise teen who moved from West Philadelphia to Bel Air, California. The trailer was such a success among fans that it went so far as to capture the attention of the original star of the series.

Now, the series that catapulted Will Smith to stardom is getting a remake.

The new series called “Bel-Air” is described as a “dramatic take” on the former series that ran for six seasons.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the new series has been in the works for well over a year after the four-minute trailer went viral last March. The creator behind the series, Morgan Cooper, has been a longtime Fresh Prince fan and directed and posted the trailer which reimagined the series with much darker undertones. Cooper will produce the series alongside the original Will Smith. He will also co-write and direct.

What’s more, the new series is headed back home

Just a month ago the repackaged drama is being shopped to streamers and will be co-produced by Smith’s Westbrook Studios and the original producer of the series: Universal TV.

According to The Hollywood Reporter Peacock, Netflix and HBO Max were some of the top streamers bidding on the series. “HBO Max is the current streaming home for the original series,” THR reports. “Bel-Air is described as an hourlong dramatic retelling of the beloved ’90s sitcom that leans into the original premise of Will’s complicated journey from the streets of West Philadelphia to the gated mansions of Bel-Air. With a reimagined vision, Bel-Air will dive deeper into the inherent conflicts, emotions and biases of what it means to be a Black man in America today, while still delivering the swagger and fun nods to the original show.”

Earlier this week, Will Smith announced on his YouTube Channel that the new series has been signed to Peacock, NBCUniversal’s streaming service.

“We have just officially closed the deal with Peacock with an unprecedented two-season order from a pitch,” Smith announced in the video. “I’ve been in this business for 30 years, and that does not happen.”

Speaking about his excitement over seeing his classic series get a modern twist, Smith said “The Carlton character — a Black, young Republican, modern-day? The heat that will be stirred up between these characters. It’s like, what’s the Hilary character in a world of Instagram and social media?”

Besides Smith, the new series will see original participants such as Quincy Jones, Benny Medina, and creators Andy & Susan Borowitzreturn return as executive producers.

You may remember that the original “Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” series ran for six seasons from 1990-1996 on NBC. At the time it was produced by Jones and Warner Bros. TV and it starred young Will Smith as the titular character “Will Smith” and featured actors James Avery, Alfonso Ribeiro, Karyn Parsons, Tatyana M. Ali, Joseph Marcell, Janet Hubert-Whitten and Daphne Maxwell Reid.

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