Culture

21 Nicaraguan Phrases You Probably Didn’t Know Existed

Jessica Roiz / MiTú

If you are Nicaraguan, or your squad includes Nicaraguan friends, you know these two things to be true: we speak as if we are singing and we curse a lot. You’d be surprised to know, however, that most of the Nica curse words are not meant to insult anyone, but instead are nicaragüense common slang words. They’re totally fine!

Don’t believe me? Here are 23 Nica words and their meaning:

1. Ideay?

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credit: Giphy.com / “Big Bang Theory” / CBS

Literal meaning: Any idea why?

What it means: A way of asking “what happened?”

How to use in a sentence: “Ideay! You’re not going to the party anymore?”

2. Maje!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Full House” / ABC

Literal meaning: Dude.

What it means: The go-to slang used to describe a person (ese maje or esa maje).

How to use in a sentence: “Maje, let’s go to the movies!”

3. Deacachimba!

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credit: Giphy.com

Literal meaning: Dope.

What it means: A way to express that something is cool AF!

How to use in a sentence: “My tía María is so deacachimba!”

4. Alagranp**a!

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credit: Giphy.com / “America’s Next Top Model” / CW

Literal meaning: A really big bitch.

What it means: Damn!

How to use in a sentence: “Alagranp••ta! Can you believe I ate all those tacos?”

5. Jodido!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Friends” / NBC

Literal meaning: Sh*tty person.

What it means: Similar to maje, jodido is a popular word used in Nicaragua to call a person.  (It can be used as both good and bad).

How to use in a sentence:
Good: “Ese jodido Bryan is my best friend!”
Bad: “Manuel is the biggest liar ever. Ugh, I hate ese jodido.”

6. A todo mamón!

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credit: Giphy.com

Literal meaning: All sucker.

What it means: To go super fast.

How to use in a sentence: “That man was driving a todo mamón!”

7. Sias Caballo!

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credit: Photobucket.com / “Adventure Time” / Cartoon Network

Literal meaning: Don’t be a horse.

What it means: Don’t be foolish or silly.

How to use in a sentence: “Did you really leave the keys in the car? Sias caballo!”

8. No me jodas!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Seinfeld” / NBC

Literal meaning: Don’t bother me.

What it means: ^^^

How to use in a sentence: “I can’t party tonight, I have a test tomorrow. No me jodas!”

9. Acalambrado!

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credit: Giphy.com

Literal meaning: Cramping.

What it means: To freak out over something.

How to use in a sentence: “He is past his deadline. Esta acalambrado.”

10. Tas’ charquito!

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credit: Ohnotheydidnt.livejournal.com / “Today” / NBC

Literal meaning: You are a puddle.

What it means: Having no experience.

How to use in a sentence: “That is not how you dance bachata. Tas’ charquito!”

11. Solo mate sos!

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credit: Giphy.com / “The Voice” / NBC

Literal meaning: You must be kidding me!

What it means: When you find something hard to believe.

How to use in a sentence: “Did you really go on a date with Shakira last night? Solo mate sos!”

12. Clase alucin!

Drake
credit: tumblr.com / @perezhilton

Literal meaning: That’s crazy!

What it means: To be trippin’ over something.

How to use in a sentence: “Did Drake just release an all-merengue album? Clase alucin!”

13. Chocho!

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credit: AmericanIdol.Tumblr.com / “American Idol” / FOX

Literal meaning: Wow!

What it means: When you are amazed.

How to use in a sentence: “Chocho! Jennifer Lopez never ages!”

14. Tuani!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Saved by the Bell” / NBC

Literal meaning: Cool.

What it means: When something is really cool or simply awesome.

How to use in a sentence: “Hey! Your family and friends are pretty tuani!”

15. Salado!

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credit: Giphy.com / MTV

Literal meaning: Salty.

What it means: Tough luck.

How to use in a sentence:
You: “I won’t go to the Mariah Carey concert. Tickets are all sold out!”
Your friend: “Salado!”

16. Si queres!

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credit: rosecoentrao.tumblr.com

Literal meaning: If you want.

What it means: Phrase used when convincing someone to do something.

How to use in a sentence: “Let’s hang out Friday night… si queres!”

17. Puchica!

Jimmy Fallon
credit: tumblr / @fallontonightgifs / NBC

Literal meaning: Damn it!

What it means: Neutral expression used as “damn it” or “oops.”

How to use in a sentence: “Puchica! I can’t believe I burned the tortillas!”

18. Dale pues!

Selena and Demi
credit: wifflegif.com / “Barney & Friends” / PBS

Literal meaning: Go ahead, then.

What it means: To agree with someone. In other words, it means “O.K.”

How to use in a sentence:
You: “Do you want extra gallo pinto and queso frito?”
Your friend: “Dale pues!”

19. Chiva

Sophia Vergara
credit: tumblr / @totalfilm / “Machete Kills” / Open Road Films

Literal meaning: Goat.

What it means: When something is dangerous.

How to use in a sentence: “Be careful! That barrio in Managua is chiva!”

20. Contra el cacho!

Bob's Burger
credit: giphy.com / “Bob’s Burger” / Hulu

Literal meaning: Against the horn.

What it means: When someone is running late.

How to use in a sentence: “Hurry up, you’re going to be late to the meeting. Ya vas contra el cacho!”

21. Jaño or Jaña

Kimye
credit: giphy.com / 2016 MTV Video Music Awards / MTV

Literal meaning: Boyfriend or girlfriend

What it means: Informal way of saying novio or novia.

How to use in a sentence: “I have the best jaño in the entire world!”

READ: This Explorer Makes History Inside A Nigaraguan Volcano And It’s Epic AF

Do you know any other Nicaraguan sayings? Sound off in the comments below and don’t forget to share the post!

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Entertainment

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Eva Longoria and Michael Peña may be two of Hollywood’s biggest Mexican-American stars, but now they can add teaching to their long list of experience.

You’re probably thinking, neta? Yes, really! Okay, well, technically…

Longoria and Peña, who are starring in this summer’s live-action Dora the Explorer film as Dora’s mother and father respectively, Dora and the Lost City of Gold, sat down with Vanity Fair to teach us (and test their own knowledge) Mexican slang. Whether you’re Mexican or not, you’ve probably heard a few of these classic phrases floating around. For example, “no manches,” which Peña explains has a lot of different definitions depending on the context, but generally translates to “get out of here” or “shut up” when responding to something that’s surprising or you just can’t believe. But these two can definitely explain it better than I can.

The definition and use of terms such as chicano, pedo, chamba, naco, among a ton of others are also broken down by the Dora and the Lost City of Gold actors in this hilarious video.

Now, be honest, how many of these do you use on a daily basis? Or how many did you have no idea what they actually meant?

The 44-year-old Corpus Christi native and the 43-year-old Chicago-born Narcos: Mexico actor aren’t the first to be recruited by Vanity Fair to teach us Mexican slang. In 2017, while on a press run for her film How to Be a Latin Lover, Salma Hayek sat in the tutorial hot seat to challenge others in the art of Mexican slang. The 52-year-old actress, who was born in Mexico, listed a few of the same phrases as shared by Longoria and Peña, but also explained the meaning behind several expressions such as “no mames,” “hombres malos,” “eso que ni que,” “tienes feria,” and “me vale madres.”

I think it’s safe to say that Salma Hayek taught us a lot of important ones here, amirite?

With Peña and Longoria’s new film, it’s probably important to become acquainted with a few of these phrases—Dora is, after all, an iconic Latina character. And the latest live-action movie features a number of Mexican and Mexican-American actors (Peña, Longoria, Eugenio Derbez, Danny Trejo, Adriana Barraza Isela Vega), so who knows if some of these terms will make their way to this big screen debut.

Based on Nickelodeon’s highly popular educational pre-school series, Dora the ExplorerDora and the Lost City of Gold follows a teenaged Dora (played by Isabela Moner) as she heads off to high school—which just might be her biggest and most challenging adventure yet. The quirky fun film sends Dora off on a mission to track down her parents, who are in need of saving, and enlists the help of her friends, including her primo Diego (played by Jeff Wahlberg) and monkey Boots. Along the way, she comes across familiar faces, like Swiper the Fox (voiced by Benicio del Toro)—who remembers the catchphrase, swiper no swiping?—while also trying to solve the mystery behind a lost Incan civilization.

The character of Dora the Explorer has played such an important role for Latino and non-Latino children alike.

Ok, so perhaps not teaching them Mexican slang like our friends Eva Longoria, Michael Peña and Salma Hayek, but most definitely teaching them Spanish. That was the case for one of those behind this new live-action take on Dora.

“My daughter knows Spanish because of Dora,” Dora and the City of Gold director James Bobin told the Los Angeles Times. “When she was little, I remember saying to her once, ‘What’s your favorite animal?’ And she said, ‘Ardilla.’ And I went, ‘A deer?’ and got a picture from a book of a deer. And she goes, ‘No, no, no, no, ardilla’ and pointed out the window [because] ardilla in Spanish is squirrel.”

And like its cartoon counterpart, Dora and the City of Gold hopes to appeal to all audiences. “The beautiful thing of the story is that thematically, it’s pretty universal,” Eva Longora said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “I think everybody’s going to understand it and relate to it. You don’t have to be Latino, but it is a celebration of our culture within the movie. Our language is in it, people who [reflect] our community are in it, it’s organically Latino. It wasn’t like ‘Insert Latino here.’ ”

Dora and the Lost City of Gold is in theaters everywhere August 9.

With This New Rule, Migrants Passing Through Mexico Will No Longer Be Eligible To Seek Asylum In The US

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With This New Rule, Migrants Passing Through Mexico Will No Longer Be Eligible To Seek Asylum In The US

ImmigrationEquality / Instagram

The US will end asylum protections for Central Americans and others who cross through Mexico to reach the southern border, the Trump administration announced Monday, a sweeping, unprecedented move that will quickly be challenged in court.

The new move, which bars asylum for any individual who crosses through a third country but does not apply there for protection before reaching the US southern border, takes effect Tuesday in the form of a regulatory change.

In a move that many are saying is illegal, Trump has moved to limit asylum protections for migrants from Central America.

Credit: @AP / Twitter

The Trump administration on Monday moved to dramatically limit the ability of Central American migrants to claim asylum if they enter the United States by land through Mexico, the latest attempt by the White House to limit immigration and toughen the US asylum process amid overcrowded conditions at border facilities.

The rule from the departments of Justice and Homeland Security would prohibit migrants who have resided or “transited en route” in a third country from seeking asylum in the US, therefore barring migrants traveling through Mexico from being able to claim asylum and as a result, drastically limit who’s eligible for asylum.

The new rule affects anyone who travels through a third country before seeking asylum in the US.

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It becomes the latest in a series of attempts by the Trump administration to actively deter asylum seekers from reaching the border. 

Many are saying that with this one rule change, the US is turning its back on the entire asylum process and likely breaking US and international law.

Many are describing the new rule as completely violating both US and international law.

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Lee Gelernt, the ACLU attorney who has led efforts to contest the Trump administration’s immigration policies in court, said the organization will challenge the new asylum rule, arguing that it is inconsistent with U.S. and international law.

“The administration is effectively trying to end asylum at the southern border,” Gelernt said. “The administration has already tried once to enact an asylum ban for individuals who cross between ports of entry and the courts struck it down because Congress has made a commitment to provide protection to individuals regardless of where they cross. The administration is now attempting an even broader bar on asylum based on which countries you transited through, but Congress made clear that it’s irrelevant whether you had to walk through other countries to get to safe haven in the United States.”

The ACLU and other immigrant’s rights organizations are already threatening immediate legal challenges.

The move is almost certain to trigger swift legal challenges, because the US Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) contains broad provisions allowing foreigners who reach US soil to apply for asylum if they claim a fear of persecution in their native countries.

An American Civil Liberties Union attorney who has been challenging Trump administration immigration policies in court said the organization would seek an injunction “immediately.”

Perhaps most disturbing, the rule change also affects unaccompanied minor children.

Credit: @TexasTribune / Twitter

Kids who come to the US border to seek asylum would now be forced to return to Mexico and first attempt a claim at asylum there.

Democratic officals pointed out the irony of Trump forcing migrants fleeing violence in their home country to seek asylum in a country he’s described as full of violence and rapists.

Credit: @HouseForeign / Twitter

Under US law, migrants are allowed to claim asylum once on US soil. There’s a caveat, however, for those who come through safe third countries, meaning countries that the US has entered into an agreement with.

The United Nations’ refugee agency defines “safe country,” in part, as “being countries in which refugees can enjoy asylum without any danger.”

But Trump’s own statements on Mexico could undercut that definition. In tweets, the President has called Mexico “one of the most dangerous country’s in the world” and claimed that the murder rate in the country has increased.

“The Coyotes and Drug Cartels are in total control of the Mexico side of the Southern Border. They have labs nearby where they make drugs to sell into the U.S. Mexico, one of the most dangerous country’s in the world, must eradicate this problem now. Also, stop the MARCH to U.S.” Trump tweeted in April.

Many took to Twitter to express their doubt about whether the president even understands how international treaties work.

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“This latest regulation is an attempt to close down one of the few remaining avenues for people in need of protection,” said Ur Jaddou, former chief counsel for the US Citizenship and Immigration Services.

“The only ray of light for those seeking safety is that Congress was clear when it enacted the asylum law and this attempt to circumvent it by regulation will likely see the same fate of other Trump administration attacks on the law and result in a federal court injunction.”

READ: After Being Denied Asylum By The US Some Migrants Are Returning Home With Mexico’s Help

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