Culture

21 Nicaraguan Phrases You Probably Didn’t Know Existed

If you are Nicaraguan, or your squad includes Nicaraguan friends, you know these two things to be true: we speak as if we are singing and we curse a lot. You’d be surprised to know, however, that most of the Nica curse words are not meant to insult anyone, but instead are nicaragüense common slang words. They’re totally fine!

Don’t believe me? Here are 23 Nica words and their meaning:

1. Ideay?

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credit: Giphy.com / “Big Bang Theory” / CBS

Literal meaning: Any idea why?

What it means: A way of asking “what happened?”

How to use in a sentence: “Ideay! You’re not going to the party anymore?”

2. Maje!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Full House” / ABC

Literal meaning: Dude.

What it means: The go-to slang used to describe a person (ese maje or esa maje).

How to use in a sentence: “Maje, let’s go to the movies!”

3. Deacachimba!

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credit: Giphy.com

Literal meaning: Dope.

What it means: A way to express that something is cool AF!

How to use in a sentence: “My tía María is so deacachimba!”

4. Alagranp**a!

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credit: Giphy.com / “America’s Next Top Model” / CW

Literal meaning: A really big bitch.

What it means: Damn!

How to use in a sentence: “Alagranp••ta! Can you believe I ate all those tacos?”

5. Jodido!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Friends” / NBC

Literal meaning: Sh*tty person.

What it means: Similar to maje, jodido is a popular word used in Nicaragua to call a person.  (It can be used as both good and bad).

How to use in a sentence:
Good: “Ese jodido Bryan is my best friend!”
Bad: “Manuel is the biggest liar ever. Ugh, I hate ese jodido.”

6. A todo mamón!

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credit: Giphy.com

Literal meaning: All sucker.

What it means: To go super fast.

How to use in a sentence: “That man was driving a todo mamón!”

7. Sias Caballo!

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credit: Photobucket.com / “Adventure Time” / Cartoon Network

Literal meaning: Don’t be a horse.

What it means: Don’t be foolish or silly.

How to use in a sentence: “Did you really leave the keys in the car? Sias caballo!”

8. No me jodas!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Seinfeld” / NBC

Literal meaning: Don’t bother me.

What it means: ^^^

How to use in a sentence: “I can’t party tonight, I have a test tomorrow. No me jodas!”

9. Acalambrado!

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credit: Giphy.com

Literal meaning: Cramping.

What it means: To freak out over something.

How to use in a sentence: “He is past his deadline. Esta acalambrado.”

10. Tas’ charquito!

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credit: Ohnotheydidnt.livejournal.com / “Today” / NBC

Literal meaning: You are a puddle.

What it means: Having no experience.

How to use in a sentence: “That is not how you dance bachata. Tas’ charquito!”

11. Solo mate sos!

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credit: Giphy.com / “The Voice” / NBC

Literal meaning: You must be kidding me!

What it means: When you find something hard to believe.

How to use in a sentence: “Did you really go on a date with Shakira last night? Solo mate sos!”

12. Clase alucin!

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credit: tumblr.com / @perezhilton

Literal meaning: That’s crazy!

What it means: To be trippin’ over something.

How to use in a sentence: “Did Drake just release an all-merengue album? Clase alucin!”

13. Chocho!

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credit: AmericanIdol.Tumblr.com / “American Idol” / FOX

Literal meaning: Wow!

What it means: When you are amazed.

How to use in a sentence: “Chocho! Jennifer Lopez never ages!”

14. Tuani!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Saved by the Bell” / NBC

Literal meaning: Cool.

What it means: When something is really cool or simply awesome.

How to use in a sentence: “Hey! Your family and friends are pretty tuani!”

15. Salado!

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credit: Giphy.com / MTV

Literal meaning: Salty.

What it means: Tough luck.

How to use in a sentence:
You: “I won’t go to the Mariah Carey concert. Tickets are all sold out!”
Your friend: “Salado!”

16. Si queres!

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credit: rosecoentrao.tumblr.com

Literal meaning: If you want.

What it means: Phrase used when convincing someone to do something.

How to use in a sentence: “Let’s hang out Friday night… si queres!”

17. Puchica!

Jimmy Fallon
credit: tumblr / @fallontonightgifs / NBC

Literal meaning: Damn it!

What it means: Neutral expression used as “damn it” or “oops.”

How to use in a sentence: “Puchica! I can’t believe I burned the tortillas!”

18. Dale pues!

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credit: wifflegif.com / “Barney & Friends” / PBS

Literal meaning: Go ahead, then.

What it means: To agree with someone. In other words, it means “O.K.”

How to use in a sentence:
You: “Do you want extra gallo pinto and queso frito?”
Your friend: “Dale pues!”

19. Chiva

Sophia Vergara
credit: tumblr / @totalfilm / “Machete Kills” / Open Road Films

Literal meaning: Goat.

What it means: When something is dangerous.

How to use in a sentence: “Be careful! That barrio in Managua is chiva!”

20. Contra el cacho!

Bob's Burger
credit: giphy.com / “Bob’s Burger” / Hulu

Literal meaning: Against the horn.

What it means: When someone is running late.

How to use in a sentence: “Hurry up, you’re going to be late to the meeting. Ya vas contra el cacho!”

21. Jaño or Jaña

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credit: giphy.com / 2016 MTV Video Music Awards / MTV

Literal meaning: Boyfriend or girlfriend

What it means: Informal way of saying novio or novia.

How to use in a sentence: “I have the best jaño in the entire world!”

READ: This Explorer Makes History Inside A Nigaraguan Volcano And It’s Epic AF

Do you know any other Nicaraguan sayings? Sound off in the comments below and don’t forget to share the post!

As Human Rights Violations Continue In Nicaragua, The Catholic Church Is Calling For Peace Talks

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As Human Rights Violations Continue In Nicaragua, The Catholic Church Is Calling For Peace Talks

There are increased concerns coming out of Nicaragua due to an on-going human rights crisis that began in April 2018 over planned cuts to welfare benefits. The government of President Daniel Ortega has been at the front of this situation and have done everything they can to silence and stop protesters.

This has all lead to multiple violent clashes on city streets between pro-government forces and protesters that have claimed more than 300 lives, injured more than 2,000 people and countless more have been imprisoned. According to human rights groups, this has included torture and the denial of due process. In return, the violence has prompted thousands of Nicaraguans to go into exile. 

Here’s how we got to this point and what is being done to put an end to the violence in Nicaragua.

Credit: @hww_intel / Twitter

Back in April, the Nicaraguan Government announced that there would be cuts in social security payments. This resulted in immediate nationwide protests that brought flashbacks of the violence seen last year. These cuts were eventually rescinded but not the protests and calls for the resignation of President Daniel Ortega, who’s in his fourth term, to step down and for swift elections to follow. President Ortega balked at the notion of leaving office and says he’ll serve his full term until the next elections in 2021. 

The Catholic church continues to be the mediator between the Ortega government and opposition forces in its efforts to initiate talks between the two bitterly entrenched sides to resolve the crippling ongoing crisis. Last week, a Vatican representative called for the continuation of talks and negotiations. The goal here is to try to release reforms to begin “free and transparent elections” in Nicaragua. 

“The Holy See has been following with great attention the sociopolitical situation in Nicaragua and believes that the unsettled disputes should be solved as soon as possible,”  Archbishop Ivan Jurkovic, the Vatican observer to U.N. agencies in Geneva, told Reuters.

The Vatican is hoping to bring both sides together in a “renewed spirit of responsibility and reconciliation” to hopefully bring forth a resolution “that respects the truth, reestablishes justice and promotes the common good.”  Jurkovic said at a speech on Sept. 10 during a session of the U.N. Human Rights Council on the situation in Nicaragua that these talks will be necessary if there is any hope of peace in the country. 

“The Holy See strongly believes that it is essential to implement the agreements reached last March, to return immediately to open and mutually respectful negotiations and to realize, at the earliest, the electoral reforms for the holding of free and transparent elections with the presence of international observers,” Archbishop Jurkovic told Reuters.

The United Nations has also called for the immediate resignation of President Ortega, who has overseen violations of human rights in Nicaragua. 

Credit: @civiccusalliance / Twitter

As the Vatican voiced its concern about Nicaragua, Michelle Bachelet, U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, made comments on the same day about the violence in the country. She noted that while violence has decreased since the Ortega government and the Civic Alliance for Justice and Democracy met for peace talks in February, there is still human rights violation occurring. 

“Between August 2018 and July 2019, human rights violations continued to occur in Nicaragua,” Bachelet told the Human Rights Council. “However, since the end of February 2019, when the Government and the Civic Alliance for Justice and Democracy resumed their dialogue, the number of violations against life and personal integrity has decreased, proof that dialogue is a possible and peaceful way to overcome the crisis.”

From mid-March to mid-June, the Ortega administration had released nearly 400 people who were detained due to protests over the last year. The majority, however, were released under restrictive measures. While most major protests have calmed over the last few months, there have been multiple human rights violations that have occurred. The government has banned public demonstrations from those that have criticized them and have also used violent tactics to stop citizens from public self-expression.  

“We cannot remain in total silence, we cannot be silent,”  Juan Mata Guevara, a bishop of Esteli, Nicaragua, said at the bishops’ conference.“This way of proceeding is an exercise of irrational authoritarianism. This reflects how the regime does not see the needs of those who suffer.”

READ: These Quesadilla Fails Will Make You Wonder How It’s Possible For People To Mess Up A Tortilla With Cheese

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Entertainment

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Eva Longoria and Michael Peña may be two of Hollywood’s biggest Mexican-American stars, but now they can add teaching to their long list of experience.

You’re probably thinking, neta? Yes, really! Okay, well, technically…

Longoria and Peña, who are starring in this summer’s live-action Dora the Explorer film as Dora’s mother and father respectively, Dora and the Lost City of Gold, sat down with Vanity Fair to teach us (and test their own knowledge) Mexican slang. Whether you’re Mexican or not, you’ve probably heard a few of these classic phrases floating around. For example, “no manches,” which Peña explains has a lot of different definitions depending on the context, but generally translates to “get out of here” or “shut up” when responding to something that’s surprising or you just can’t believe. But these two can definitely explain it better than I can.

The definition and use of terms such as chicano, pedo, chamba, naco, among a ton of others are also broken down by the Dora and the Lost City of Gold actors in this hilarious video.

Now, be honest, how many of these do you use on a daily basis? Or how many did you have no idea what they actually meant?

The 44-year-old Corpus Christi native and the 43-year-old Chicago-born Narcos: Mexico actor aren’t the first to be recruited by Vanity Fair to teach us Mexican slang. In 2017, while on a press run for her film How to Be a Latin Lover, Salma Hayek sat in the tutorial hot seat to challenge others in the art of Mexican slang. The 52-year-old actress, who was born in Mexico, listed a few of the same phrases as shared by Longoria and Peña, but also explained the meaning behind several expressions such as “no mames,” “hombres malos,” “eso que ni que,” “tienes feria,” and “me vale madres.”

I think it’s safe to say that Salma Hayek taught us a lot of important ones here, amirite?

With Peña and Longoria’s new film, it’s probably important to become acquainted with a few of these phrases—Dora is, after all, an iconic Latina character. And the latest live-action movie features a number of Mexican and Mexican-American actors (Peña, Longoria, Eugenio Derbez, Danny Trejo, Adriana Barraza Isela Vega), so who knows if some of these terms will make their way to this big screen debut.

Based on Nickelodeon’s highly popular educational pre-school series, Dora the ExplorerDora and the Lost City of Gold follows a teenaged Dora (played by Isabela Moner) as she heads off to high school—which just might be her biggest and most challenging adventure yet. The quirky fun film sends Dora off on a mission to track down her parents, who are in need of saving, and enlists the help of her friends, including her primo Diego (played by Jeff Wahlberg) and monkey Boots. Along the way, she comes across familiar faces, like Swiper the Fox (voiced by Benicio del Toro)—who remembers the catchphrase, swiper no swiping?—while also trying to solve the mystery behind a lost Incan civilization.

The character of Dora the Explorer has played such an important role for Latino and non-Latino children alike.

Ok, so perhaps not teaching them Mexican slang like our friends Eva Longoria, Michael Peña and Salma Hayek, but most definitely teaching them Spanish. That was the case for one of those behind this new live-action take on Dora.

“My daughter knows Spanish because of Dora,” Dora and the City of Gold director James Bobin told the Los Angeles Times. “When she was little, I remember saying to her once, ‘What’s your favorite animal?’ And she said, ‘Ardilla.’ And I went, ‘A deer?’ and got a picture from a book of a deer. And she goes, ‘No, no, no, no, ardilla’ and pointed out the window [because] ardilla in Spanish is squirrel.”

And like its cartoon counterpart, Dora and the City of Gold hopes to appeal to all audiences. “The beautiful thing of the story is that thematically, it’s pretty universal,” Eva Longora said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “I think everybody’s going to understand it and relate to it. You don’t have to be Latino, but it is a celebration of our culture within the movie. Our language is in it, people who [reflect] our community are in it, it’s organically Latino. It wasn’t like ‘Insert Latino here.’ ”

Dora and the Lost City of Gold is in theaters everywhere August 9.