Culture

21 Nicaraguan Phrases You Probably Didn’t Know Existed

If you are Nicaraguan, or your squad includes Nicaraguan friends, you know these two things to be true: we speak as if we are singing and we curse a lot. You’d be surprised to know, however, that most of the Nica curse words are not meant to insult anyone, but instead are nicaragüense common slang words. They’re totally fine!

Don’t believe me? Here are 23 Nica words and their meaning:

1. Ideay?

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credit: Giphy.com / “Big Bang Theory” / CBS

Literal meaning: Any idea why?

What it means: A way of asking “what happened?”

How to use in a sentence: “Ideay! You’re not going to the party anymore?”

2. Maje!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Full House” / ABC

Literal meaning: Dude.

What it means: The go-to slang used to describe a person (ese maje or esa maje).

How to use in a sentence: “Maje, let’s go to the movies!”

3. Deacachimba!

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credit: Giphy.com

Literal meaning: Dope.

What it means: A way to express that something is cool AF!

How to use in a sentence: “My tía María is so deacachimba!”

4. Alagranp**a!

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credit: Giphy.com / “America’s Next Top Model” / CW

Literal meaning: A really big bitch.

What it means: Damn!

How to use in a sentence: “Alagranp••ta! Can you believe I ate all those tacos?”

5. Jodido!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Friends” / NBC

Literal meaning: Sh*tty person.

What it means: Similar to maje, jodido is a popular word used in Nicaragua to call a person.  (It can be used as both good and bad).

How to use in a sentence:
Good: “Ese jodido Bryan is my best friend!”
Bad: “Manuel is the biggest liar ever. Ugh, I hate ese jodido.”

6. A todo mamón!

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credit: Giphy.com

Literal meaning: All sucker.

What it means: To go super fast.

How to use in a sentence: “That man was driving a todo mamón!”

7. Sias Caballo!

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credit: Photobucket.com / “Adventure Time” / Cartoon Network

Literal meaning: Don’t be a horse.

What it means: Don’t be foolish or silly.

How to use in a sentence: “Did you really leave the keys in the car? Sias caballo!”

8. No me jodas!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Seinfeld” / NBC

Literal meaning: Don’t bother me.

What it means: ^^^

How to use in a sentence: “I can’t party tonight, I have a test tomorrow. No me jodas!”

9. Acalambrado!

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credit: Giphy.com

Literal meaning: Cramping.

What it means: To freak out over something.

How to use in a sentence: “He is past his deadline. Esta acalambrado.”

10. Tas’ charquito!

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credit: Ohnotheydidnt.livejournal.com / “Today” / NBC

Literal meaning: You are a puddle.

What it means: Having no experience.

How to use in a sentence: “That is not how you dance bachata. Tas’ charquito!”

11. Solo mate sos!

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credit: Giphy.com / “The Voice” / NBC

Literal meaning: You must be kidding me!

What it means: When you find something hard to believe.

How to use in a sentence: “Did you really go on a date with Shakira last night? Solo mate sos!”

12. Clase alucin!

Drake
credit: tumblr.com / @perezhilton

Literal meaning: That’s crazy!

What it means: To be trippin’ over something.

How to use in a sentence: “Did Drake just release an all-merengue album? Clase alucin!”

13. Chocho!

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credit: AmericanIdol.Tumblr.com / “American Idol” / FOX

Literal meaning: Wow!

What it means: When you are amazed.

How to use in a sentence: “Chocho! Jennifer Lopez never ages!”

14. Tuani!

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credit: Giphy.com / “Saved by the Bell” / NBC

Literal meaning: Cool.

What it means: When something is really cool or simply awesome.

How to use in a sentence: “Hey! Your family and friends are pretty tuani!”

15. Salado!

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credit: Giphy.com / MTV

Literal meaning: Salty.

What it means: Tough luck.

How to use in a sentence:
You: “I won’t go to the Mariah Carey concert. Tickets are all sold out!”
Your friend: “Salado!”

16. Si queres!

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credit: rosecoentrao.tumblr.com

Literal meaning: If you want.

What it means: Phrase used when convincing someone to do something.

How to use in a sentence: “Let’s hang out Friday night… si queres!”

17. Puchica!

Jimmy Fallon
credit: tumblr / @fallontonightgifs / NBC

Literal meaning: Damn it!

What it means: Neutral expression used as “damn it” or “oops.”

How to use in a sentence: “Puchica! I can’t believe I burned the tortillas!”

18. Dale pues!

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credit: wifflegif.com / “Barney & Friends” / PBS

Literal meaning: Go ahead, then.

What it means: To agree with someone. In other words, it means “O.K.”

How to use in a sentence:
You: “Do you want extra gallo pinto and queso frito?”
Your friend: “Dale pues!”

19. Chiva

Sophia Vergara
credit: tumblr / @totalfilm / “Machete Kills” / Open Road Films

Literal meaning: Goat.

What it means: When something is dangerous.

How to use in a sentence: “Be careful! That barrio in Managua is chiva!”

20. Contra el cacho!

Bob's Burger
credit: giphy.com / “Bob’s Burger” / Hulu

Literal meaning: Against the horn.

What it means: When someone is running late.

How to use in a sentence: “Hurry up, you’re going to be late to the meeting. Ya vas contra el cacho!”

21. Jaño or Jaña

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credit: giphy.com / 2016 MTV Video Music Awards / MTV

Literal meaning: Boyfriend or girlfriend

What it means: Informal way of saying novio or novia.

How to use in a sentence: “I have the best jaño in the entire world!”

READ: This Explorer Makes History Inside A Nigaraguan Volcano And It’s Epic AF

Do you know any other Nicaraguan sayings? Sound off in the comments below and don’t forget to share the post!

10 Slang Phrases That We Hope to Never See Again in the New Decade

Entertainment

10 Slang Phrases That We Hope to Never See Again in the New Decade

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Slang gets a bad rap from older generations who think us young folk are too lazy to reach for a thesaurus. But what older people don’t know is that sprinkling our vocabulary with bright and shiny slang words is a creative exercise. Why say something straightforward when you can embellish it a bit with a fun phrase or two? But like any new object, when something is played with too much, it loses its initial allure. 

\Recently, pop culture writer Joe Berkowitz asked his Twitter followers what slang words from the 2010s they hoped to never see again with the dawning of the new decade.

From “slay” to “spirit animal” Berkowitz’s 20,000 followers had no problem sharing the slang words they’d be happy to leave behind in the 2010s. We compiled a list of the top 10 most liked and retweeted options. Take a look at some of the winners below!

1. Slay

Twitter seems to largely agree that the term “slay” has become over-used and over-exposed in the latter years of the 2010 decade. However, other Twitter users were arguing that it only became over-used when it was appropriated by the mainstream from largely POC and LGBTQ communities. “Nope,” said Twitter user @ShrimpLingSoup. “The black lbgtqia community will decide when slay dies, just like they decided the time for #slay to be born”.

2.  On Fleek

The slang term “on fleek” was invented by Kayla Newman in 2014. It quickly went viral and everyone from Ariana Grande to Sir Patrick Stewart was getting in on the action. Unfortunately, it’s possible for slang to become distinctly un-cool once it’s used too much. We vote for this phrase to be left behind in the 2010s.

3. Slaps

Twitter user @leowulv is tired of hearing the phrase “slaps” as a way to describe something that is mediocre at best. “Saying something “slaps” when it’s deemed to be generally very good” he said on Berkowitz’s Twitter thread. “I guess it was fine when talking about a song but I def. have heard ppl say stuff like ‘damn, this burrito straight slaps’ and… just no”.

4. Adulting

“Adulting” is a term millennials invented to describe their disillusionment around the transition from childhood to adulthood. As millennials began to grow older and pay taxes, get their oil changed, and buy checkbooks all by themselves, they began to celebrate their small victories online by calling these small wins “adulting”. Quickly, a wave of criticism was leveled at the term for celebrating behavior that many considered just doing the bare minimum in life.

5. Stan

The user of the word “stan” as a way to say you’re a fan of something “makes me want to murder people,” says Twitter user @Limeylizzie. And while we agree that the word is pretty over-used, we have to admit that we’ve been guilty of heavily relying on this word ourselves sometimes.

6. Clapped Back

“Clapped back” is a phrase that was born out of necessity. The internet has given birth to a culture of online haters and public shaming. All this hate has made it necessary for people (usually celebrities) at the receiving end of criticism  to have an opportunity to respond to hate. Thus, the “clap-back” was born. But, what used to be a term of empowerment has become hokey and outdated.

7. Spirit Animal

“Calling a thing that is not an animal your spirit animal. Likeee saying @lizzo is your spirit animal. No, Lizzo is a person,” says Twitter user @K_Trappp. “You can look at a baby giraffe and say ‘hey that’s my spirit animal’ but not with humans!”

8. “I did a thing”

People started using the phrase “I did a thing” especially in the captions of their Instagram posts to describe pretty much…anything. Twitter user @PrairieDawn2011 hates this phrase “especially when ‘the thing’ is getting like an inch of hair cut off”. We agree that people can be a bit more creative when describing current events in their lives.

9. Bae

Bae, which comes from the acronym “Before Anyone Else” became woefully overused in the 2010s. Everything from one’s actual S.O. to a delicious burrito was described as “bae”. As Twitter user @deidralouisee so eloquently put it: “As a whore for linguistics and social changes around language evolving, and evolving forms of communication- I love all generational slang BUT bae can kiss my ass”.

10. Karen

In the 2010s, “Karen” became shorthand for an annoying lady who used her white privilege to her advantage at the expense of others. However, it became tired after people start using the phrase at the end of every sentence in order to add some humor to an otherwise humorless statement. “Dropping a random woman’s name because you can’t think of a joke, Karen”

As Human Rights Violations Continue In Nicaragua, The Catholic Church Is Calling For Peace Talks

Things That Matter

As Human Rights Violations Continue In Nicaragua, The Catholic Church Is Calling For Peace Talks

There are increased concerns coming out of Nicaragua due to an on-going human rights crisis that began in April 2018 over planned cuts to welfare benefits. The government of President Daniel Ortega has been at the front of this situation and have done everything they can to silence and stop protesters.

This has all lead to multiple violent clashes on city streets between pro-government forces and protesters that have claimed more than 300 lives, injured more than 2,000 people and countless more have been imprisoned. According to human rights groups, this has included torture and the denial of due process. In return, the violence has prompted thousands of Nicaraguans to go into exile. 

Here’s how we got to this point and what is being done to put an end to the violence in Nicaragua.

Credit: @hww_intel / Twitter

Back in April, the Nicaraguan Government announced that there would be cuts in social security payments. This resulted in immediate nationwide protests that brought flashbacks of the violence seen last year. These cuts were eventually rescinded but not the protests and calls for the resignation of President Daniel Ortega, who’s in his fourth term, to step down and for swift elections to follow. President Ortega balked at the notion of leaving office and says he’ll serve his full term until the next elections in 2021. 

The Catholic church continues to be the mediator between the Ortega government and opposition forces in its efforts to initiate talks between the two bitterly entrenched sides to resolve the crippling ongoing crisis. Last week, a Vatican representative called for the continuation of talks and negotiations. The goal here is to try to release reforms to begin “free and transparent elections” in Nicaragua. 

“The Holy See has been following with great attention the sociopolitical situation in Nicaragua and believes that the unsettled disputes should be solved as soon as possible,”  Archbishop Ivan Jurkovic, the Vatican observer to U.N. agencies in Geneva, told Reuters.

The Vatican is hoping to bring both sides together in a “renewed spirit of responsibility and reconciliation” to hopefully bring forth a resolution “that respects the truth, reestablishes justice and promotes the common good.”  Jurkovic said at a speech on Sept. 10 during a session of the U.N. Human Rights Council on the situation in Nicaragua that these talks will be necessary if there is any hope of peace in the country. 

“The Holy See strongly believes that it is essential to implement the agreements reached last March, to return immediately to open and mutually respectful negotiations and to realize, at the earliest, the electoral reforms for the holding of free and transparent elections with the presence of international observers,” Archbishop Jurkovic told Reuters.

The United Nations has also called for the immediate resignation of President Ortega, who has overseen violations of human rights in Nicaragua. 

Credit: @civiccusalliance / Twitter

As the Vatican voiced its concern about Nicaragua, Michelle Bachelet, U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, made comments on the same day about the violence in the country. She noted that while violence has decreased since the Ortega government and the Civic Alliance for Justice and Democracy met for peace talks in February, there is still human rights violation occurring. 

“Between August 2018 and July 2019, human rights violations continued to occur in Nicaragua,” Bachelet told the Human Rights Council. “However, since the end of February 2019, when the Government and the Civic Alliance for Justice and Democracy resumed their dialogue, the number of violations against life and personal integrity has decreased, proof that dialogue is a possible and peaceful way to overcome the crisis.”

From mid-March to mid-June, the Ortega administration had released nearly 400 people who were detained due to protests over the last year. The majority, however, were released under restrictive measures. While most major protests have calmed over the last few months, there have been multiple human rights violations that have occurred. The government has banned public demonstrations from those that have criticized them and have also used violent tactics to stop citizens from public self-expression.  

“We cannot remain in total silence, we cannot be silent,”  Juan Mata Guevara, a bishop of Esteli, Nicaragua, said at the bishops’ conference.“This way of proceeding is an exercise of irrational authoritarianism. This reflects how the regime does not see the needs of those who suffer.”

READ: These Quesadilla Fails Will Make You Wonder How It’s Possible For People To Mess Up A Tortilla With Cheese