entertainment

When Was The First Time You Saw Yourself Reflected On TV?

I can remember the first time I saw a family like mine on television. They were called the Delgados, and they lived on a pretty famous street.

Writing about “Sesame Street’s”‘ new Latina character reminded me how valuable it was to grow up with Luis and Maria Delgado, two characters — played by a Mexican-American and a Puerto Rican actor, respectively — who acted and sounded a lot like my own parents. (Except they never told me to make my bed, and so were even cooler than my parents.) When their daughter, Gaby, was introduced on the show, it presented a girl who was a lot like me and girls I knew: She spoke English and Spanish! Her parents loved her, but were kiiinda strict. Even her name — unlike the Brendas and Lisas also on TV at the time — was familiar, grounded in an experience I knew and felt at home in. She was like a cousin, only on the other side of a screen.

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Credit: Sesame Street / YouTube / Tiny Dancer

The same was true for “Que Pasa USA,” a truly groundbreaking, fully bilingual show about a Cuban exile family living in Miami that aired on public television and routinely made me laugh until tears ran down my face. The Peña family was like my family, only maybe a little funnier, and they made me feel, from an extremely early age, that my story was one worth telling, one that deserved to be on television and shared with an audience.

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Credit: PBS / YouTube / USAHavana

And it’s not like the only people we can relate to as Latinos are other Latinos. (If that was the case, we wouldn’t consistently over-index when it comes to media engagement.) For instance: There’s a scene in “Fresh Off the Boat” that shows the Huang family sitting down to watch “All American Girl.” That one, brief little scene drove home that it’s been a hell of a long time since an Asian-American family was the focus of a U.S. TV sitcom, and that the Huang family may not have existed without “All American Girl” paving the way. It’s a scene that was also relatable, I think, to anyone who has yearned to see more faces, accents and names like theirs on TV. (Like, say, Latinos.) Of course, it’s also not like every Latino presented on TV is instantly relatable to all of us (see: Carlos Mencia). But seeing a specifically Latino story that mirrors your own so closely works to validate that your voice, your experience, and your ideas are of value to people beyond you. After all, you can’t be what you can’t see.

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Credit: ABC / Fusion

So, here’s my question for all you: When was the first time you saw yourself reflected on television? When was your “hard relate” moment? And if that’s never happened for you, do you have faith that it’ll happen soon?

Let us know in the comments thread or on Facebook, and your responses might be used in an upcoming post here on Mitú.

READ: After Years Of Hard Work, This Cubana Is Killing It In Hollywood

Let us know! And remember to click “like” on our Facebook page. I mean, like. If you want to. No pressure.

9 Selena Covers That Prove She Will Always Be La Reina

entertainment

9 Selena Covers That Prove She Will Always Be La Reina

There is a reason we all still love and sing Selena songs to this day. Everyone from Kat Von D to Jackie Cruz have covered Selena songs and each is just another reminder why we all love La Reina.

Kacey Musgraves gave Selena a fitting tribute during her concert at Rodeo Houston.

The Grammy winner was raised in Texas so her love for Selena is real and deep. She grew up listening to the Tejano singer and it shows in her ability to sing in Spanish for adoring fans.

Camila Cabello also gave Selena a great tribute at the same venue.

Obviously, a young Latina like Cabello is very familiar with Selena and her iconic music. It has been 24 years since Selena took the stage at the Houston AstroDome and the year has inspired artists to give her a special shoutout when in her state.

Jackie Cruz totally blew us away with her modern take on “Como La Flor.”

She had all of us screaming, “Como La Floooooorrrr” and opened our eyes to this talent we didn’t know she had.

Paulina Rubio made everyone emotional during her version of “Fotos Y Recuerdos” during Selena Vive.

Me still: ? ?

Thalía belting “Amor Prohibido” proved to all of us that Selena’s music is definitely here to stay.

TBH, it was probably the first song any of us could sing all the way through.

Even Selena Gomez, named after the Tejano pop star, had to cover “Bidi Bidi Bom Bom” during an early concert.

Seriously, Selena permeates ALL of pop culture, from Selena Gomez to Beyoncé.

“Dreaming Of You” sounded so dreamy when Bruno Mars treated his audience to an unexpected tribute.

Just when you think you can’t love Bruno Mars any more, he goes and does that.

Even Suzette Quintanilla appreciated Adrienne Bailon’s “I Could Fall In Love” cover.

Yaaasssss!!

It makes total sense Kumbia Kings did a “Baila Esta Cumbia” cover and they did it so much justice.

Get it, boys! Selena would be proud.

Little Becky G even did a medley of four classic and instantly recognizable Selena songs.

She hit “Como La Flor,” “Baila Esta Cumbia,” ‘Bidi Bidi Bom Bom,” AND “Techno Cumbia” in ONE medley and her hand gestures were on point.

And, let’s not forget the woman who brought Selena to life on the big screen covering “No Me Queda Más” like only she can.

We see you J.Lo and we appreciate you.

READ: 11 Times We Couldn’t Handle Selena’s Cuteness In Her Interviews

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