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15 Things Latino Parents Have Definitely Threatened Us With

If you still cringe when you hear someone count to 3 slowly in Spanish, you are not alone. Together, we can seek closure. Or an affordable therapist.


1. A “Pow-Pow”

2. Un Chancletazo

Happy mother's day ???? #Borracha #HispanicMom #Reality #Typical #Chancletazo #Hi

A photo posted by Misz.Dee (@iammisz_dee) on

3. Una galleta.

Credit: @OhReg / Twitter
Credit: Mitú / Regina Castañeda

Literally: a cracker. Non-literally: a smack across the face. It’s confusing: your mind gets worried, but your body gets hungry.


4. Threatening to stop the car.

Credit: knowyourmeme.com / Google

5. Taking your phone away.

6. Separation from your siblings.

Credit: simpsonsworld.com / Giphy

So what if you made your baby brother bleed? You toughened him up; he’ll thank you later! Pero like, after the stitches wear off.


7. Not letting you see your primos

Credit: Reddit

Which sucks, because those are the only people your mom trusts without having to do a background check on, find a credit report for, or have investigators follow.


8. Never letting you sleep over.

Trying to explain to your Non-Hispanic Friend why you can't Sleep Over. #TeamLeJuan

A video posted by LeJuan James (@lejuanjames) on

9. The cocotazo!

Credit: Comcast Sportsnet / bleacherreport.com / Twitter / Google

10. Un sopapo.

At first you’re trying not to laugh because that word is hilarious…

Credit: SNL / NBC / forthegreatergoodofalbion.tumblr.com / Giphy

Then you remember the last time you received one…

Credit: nbcsnl.tumblr.com / Giphy

11. Un bofetón.

LMFAO #Bofeta #500mg #RP

A photo posted by Alex (@peaceof_mind_) on

12. Una patada al culo.

Credit:http://lomltoday.tumblr.com/

RUN or ponte pá tu número STAT.


13. Un pescoset.

Las tengo en especial!!! #Pescoset ???? ✋???

A photo posted by djcoffie (@djcoffie) on

14. El cinturón.

Credit: WWE / ilovewrestlinggifs.tumblr.com / Giphy

Even just the mere mention of it made you stop whatever you were doing: “A las una… a las dos… y…”


And, finally…

15. Death itself.

Credit: giphy.com/whitneycummingshbo

“If you endanger your life by getting a motorcycle, te voy a matar.” Wait. What?


So remember kids, no matter how many times your parents feign ignorance by saying, “I don’t know what I’m going to do with you kids,” they already have 142 options in mind.


READ: 13 Ways Mom Put Her Chanclas To Good Use

What would your loving parents threaten you with? Mitú wants to know; comment below.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

With Halloween Canceled For Many, Parents Are Sharing Their Spooky Plans For Their Kids During COVID

Fierce

With Halloween Canceled For Many, Parents Are Sharing Their Spooky Plans For Their Kids During COVID

Jeenah Moon / Getty

It’s Halloween season but there are creepier things than ghosts and witches lingering in the air: fear of COVID.

As people across the globe begin to prepare for the fall and winter holidays, Halloween included, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is doling out words of warning when it comes to gathering around your community. In fact, the public agency recently advised that “when planning to host a holiday celebration, you should assess current COVID-19 levels in your community to determine whether to postpone, cancel, or limit the number of attendees.”

For many parents cautious of spreading the disease to loved ones and strangers, trick-or-treating isn’t going to be an option on the table.

We dug around Reddit to see just how parents are going to make the Halloween season special for their kids this year.

Check out their answers and ideas below!

“I’m trying to salvage as much of the holidays as I can for the kids. I’m planning to put a table at the end of my driveway with candy laid out, and a bottle of sanitizer so that kids don’t have to come to my door. Figure I’ll sit at the other end of the driveway and yell happy Halloween to anyone who comes by and restock the table as needed. Anyone else planning on doing something similar? Just curious if other parents are going to let their kids out at all.”- u/beejonez

“I won’t be taking my kids trick or treating this year but I do plan to make them goodie bags with Halloween themed stuff. My 7-year-old suggested we do an egg hunt im the yard like we do on Easter. I think she’s on to something with that idea.”- jeezlouise45

“We’re doing a Glow-in-the Dark, candy hunt. Painting our Easter eggs with paint and then doing it at night. We are making a day of it. Spooky foods and our own halloween party. I wasnt planning on not doing trick or treating this year, but all our neighbors decorated and I’m confused if it a go?! I wasn’t going to do any TorT. I might put something out for kids, like individual bags? I we may go to our neighbors, in our cul da sac, but defiantly not neighborhood. I guess we’ll see on Halloween.”- Wam_2020

“I have seen a lot of back and forth. The CDC, OHA and most health organizations are recommending doing nothing like a traditional Halloween this year. Including just putting candy out form a distance, as you are. We aren’t going out, Halloween will come next year. Going to dress up, watch a movie and eat the candy we would have handed out.” –HowdyAudi

“I actually hope we have a big rain storm, so the kids don’t feel like they missed out.”-Wam_2020

“I grabbed halloween bags from Winco and have prefilled them with candy. I will be passing them out from the end of my driveway as well so kids won’t be sticking their hands in a bowl or messing with sanitizer with gloves on. Just my gloved hands, my N95 mask, and the best compromise between safety and traditions I just won’t give up for anything I can arrange. Plus I’m, at least one of, if not, the “Full Sized Candy Bar” house in a neighborhood dominated by lower income families.” –Herr__Nilpferd

“I’m not taking my kids out. I think we will set up a table at the end of the driveway and give out candy with bbq tongs as our house is very decorated and I’m sure some folks will still be out TorTing. As for my kids I think they’re gonna get a candy shopping spree at the store.” –mithygreg

“Thanks for the insights. I’ll probably still put some candy out for the few that come around. But haunted hunts and such sound like fun things to distract my 5yo with.”- beejonez

“We’re a scavenger hunt at the homes of people in our Coronavirus bubble if I get my shit together and organize it … Giving each of our kids basically a Halloween version of an Easter basket.” –sunnydpdx

“I’m buying a shitload of candy and eating it while Watching spooky movies by myself, happy early Halloween guys.” –s3r1ous_n00b

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The Number Of Latinos In The U.S Killed By Covid-19 Surpasses 44,500 With No Signs Of Slowing Down

Things That Matter

The Number Of Latinos In The U.S Killed By Covid-19 Surpasses 44,500 With No Signs Of Slowing Down

Wilfredo Lee / Getty Images

For months we have heard stories from our neighbors and our friends of people losing loved ones to Covid-19. It seems that with each passing day the degrees of separation from ourselves and the virus gets smaller and smaller.

Although this is true for all demographics, it’s particularly true for the Latino community. New data shows that although Latinos make up about 19% of the national population, we account for nearly a third of all deaths. These numbers are staggering and experts are warning that entire communities are being decimated by the pandemic.

More than 44,500 Latinos have died of Covid-19 in the United States.

It’s no secret that the Coronavirus has ravaged our community but now we have concrete numbers that show just how bad the pandemic has been among Latinos. According to new data from the COVID Tracking Project, over 44,500 of the nearly 211,000 people in the U.S. killed by the Coronavirus to date are Latino.

While Latinos are under 19 percent of the U.S. population, we make up almost one-third of Coronavirus deaths nationwide, according to CDC data analyzed by Salud America, a health research institute in San Antonio. Among some age groups, like those 35 to 44, the distribution of Latino Covid deaths is almost 50 percent; among Latinos ages 45-54, it’s almost 44 percent.

Experts say several factors account for higher COVID-19 death and infection rates among Latinos versus whites, including poverty, health care disparities, the prevalence of serious underlying medical conditions, and greater exposure to the virus at work because of the kinds of working-class, essential jobs many Latinos have.

Many Latinos who have been infected or died of the Coronavirus are front-line or essential workers.

Credit: Wilfredo Lee / Getty Images

So many of our family members and neighbors work jobs that are now considered “essential.” From building cleaning services, to restaurant workers, grocery store employees, nurses, and farm workers, our community is on the front lines more than any other community in this fight against the pandemic.

In fact, 41.2 percent of all front-line workers are Black, Hispanic or Asian-American/Pacific Islander, according to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, an economic policy think tank. Hispanics are especially overrepresented in building cleaning services (40.2 percent of workers).

Latinos also have the highest uninsured rates of any racial or ethnic group in the U.S., according to the Department of Health and Human Services. All of these factors add up to a dangerous and deadly combination that has resulted in the outsized number of deaths among Latinos.

Some are saying that the virus is causing the ‘historic decimation’ of Latinos.

Speaking at a virtual Congressional Hispanic Caucus meeting last week, a global health expert warned that the Coronavirus is causing “the historic decimation” of the Latino community, ravaging generations of loved ones in Hispanic families.

To illustrate his point, Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of Tropical Medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, read off descriptions of people who died on Aug. 13 in Houston alone.

“Hispanic male, Hispanic male, Hispanic male, black male, Hispanic male, black male, Hispanic male, Hispanic female, black female, black male, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic” Hotez said, adding that many are people in their 40s, 50s and 60s.

“This virus is taking away a whole generation of mothers and fathers and brothers and sisters, you know, who are young kids, teenage kids. And it occurred to me that what we’re seeing really is the historic decimation among the Hispanic community by the virus,” he said.

Dr. Anthony Fauci – a popular figure in the fight against Coronavirus – has also raised the alarm.

The nation’s leading infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, gave a recent update on the impact on the Latino community. He pointed out that hospitalizations among Latinos 359 per 100,000 compared to 78 in whites. Deaths related to Covid-19 are 61 per 100,000 in the Latino population compared to 40 in whites, and Latinos represent 45 percent of deaths of people younger than 21, Fauci said.

Fauci said the country can begin to address this “extraordinary problem” now by making sure the community gets adequate testing and immediate access to care. But he said this is not a one-shot resolution.

“This must now reset and re-shine a light on this disparity related to social determinants of health that are experienced by the Latinx community — the fact that they have a higher incidence of co-morbidities, which put you at risk,” Fauci said.

Fauci also urged the Latino congressional members on the call to get their Latino constituents to consider enrolling in vaccination trials so they can be proven to be safe in everyone, including African Americans and Latinos.

“We need to get a diverse representation of the population in the clinical trials,” he said.

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