A Teacher In Mexico Translated The Song ‘La Chona’ To Help Her Class Improve Their English

Tania Selene Félix Castro / YouTube

“Everybody knows her and La Chona is her name.”

Learning a new language is tough. No matter how hard you study at first, it usually takes a while before you can actually hold a conversation with someone. It can become tedious when you can’t put what you’re learning into practice. Sometimes, watching movies or listening to songs in the language you’re learning can make the process more enjoyable.

Tania Selene Félix, an English teacher in Ciudad Obregon, Sonora, Mexico, wanted to do something fun to help her students practice, so she translated the Tucanes de Tijuana song “La Chona” and had her students sing the English-language version at the end of their classes. Last week, Félix posted a video clip of one of their sessions, and soon, the video went viral.

“I always put on music in English so [my students] can get used to the language,” said Félix to El Pais. “One of my students asked me to put on ‘La Chona,’ but I told him no because it was in Spanish.” Rather than completely nix the idea, Félix decided to translate the lyrics of the song.

Here are the lyrics in case you want to sing along:

I’ll tell you the story of a famous city girl.

Everybody knows her and La Chona is her name.

Everybody knows her and La Chona is her name.

Her husband is crying, he doesn’t know what to do.

 

Daily, she is dancing and spending on her booze.

Daily, she is dancing and spending on her booze.

The band has started, they’re playing the first song.

 

La Chona is ready, ready looking for a boy.

La Chona is ready, ready looking for a boy.

People are watching and they’re all singing aloud.

 

Bravo, bravo. Chona, about dancing, you’re the one.

Bravo, bravo. Chona, about dancing, you’re the one.

And La Chona is moving, and the people are yelling.

 

No one is like La Chona, dancing la quebradita.

And La Chona is dancing, whatever they’re playing.

Music of any kind, never loses her jumping.

Félix told El Pais she’s gotten criticism for her method of teaching but maintained that it’s just one of many things she does to keep class entertaining. Félix says she’s aware that the song doesn’t completely follow grammatical rules, but says it’s interesting to teach students how many songs are translated so they can fit the rhythm of the original song. “The reality is that it was something we would do for five minutes on Fridays to relax and review what we learned in class.”

H/T: Buzzfeed

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