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[VIDEO] Resurfaced Clip of Sofia Vergara Being Harassed by Gordon Ramsay and Jay Leno, Still El Peor

In a resurfaced video of Sofia Vergara appearing as a guest on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno in 2010, Vergara, appears visibly uncomfortable and annoyed at various times during the interview. Vergara’s discomfort is particularly easy to see now in 2018, as a result of increased awareness created by the #MeToo movement, and the ouster of men in powerful positions for sexual misconduct: Matt Lauer (NBC), Charlie Rose (CBS), Harvey Weinstein (The Weinstein Company), Russell Simmons (Def Jam Recordings), and Kevin Spacey (Netflix) to name a few. In light of increased cultural awareness about sexual harassment and consent, people seem to be viewing the Vergara clip with a fresh set of eyes.

During the ten or so minute video, at least 14 sexually-charged comments are made about Vergara’s body and appearance.

sofiavergara / Instagram

In the 2010 video, Vergara is seated next to Hell’s Kitchen star, Gordon Ramsay, Vergara and subject to six-minutes of male harassment, much of it sexual, coming from both Ramsay and host of the show, Jay Leno. The flagrant sexual innuendos and harassment began soon after Vergara takes her seat in a chair near Leno’s desk. Sitting between Ramsay and Leno, Vergara apologizes to the two men for screaming at them in a comedy bit filmed in advance of the sit-down. She says, “I’m sorry. I never scream like that in real life.” Ramsay cuts in and says “Only in the bedroom.” Vergara lowers her eyes and looks down at her lap as if put off.

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credit: Wikipedia


Soon after the interview begins Leno asks Vergara about a recent vacation to Italy, and she discusses the food she ate. Photos of the trip flash on the screen, photos that she provided to the show, including one of herself wearing a white bikini. While discussing a photo of the star eating a large piece of pizza, Ramsay says, “You just pick it up and stick it in your mouth?” While they all laugh at his comment, Ramsay’s face turns bright red, appearing to have embarrassed himself with the remark. He seems to recover from his embarrassment by insulting the Colombian dulce de leche ice cream that Vergara brought for Leno to try during the segment. About the ice cream, Ramsay presumably says, “You can take it back to fucking Colombia.” The expletive is, of course, bleeped out.

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Credit: NBC

At one point in the video, Vergara slaps Ramsay’s hand away after he touches her on the hip. This after he’s touched her twice already. To further make her point she yells “No touching” at him.

Many who watched the segment on YouTube, commented on Ramsay’s behavior, accusing him of being juvenile and gross.

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After watching the clip, one fan of Gordon Ramsay changed their opinion about him altogether.

Many also commented on Vergara’s body language and apparent discomfort.

Youtube

Vergara who once said that she didn’t understand why women are offended by being objectified by men, did appear uncomfortable with the comments made about her body.

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Still, when groped by Gordon Ramsay, she makes a comment about him in Spanish, “Este no respeta,” or “he has no respect.” For his part, Ramsay, who leaps about, moves forward and back in his chair, spreads his legs wide at one point, and puts his hands over his crotch, appears to grow more and more emboldened as the segment goes on. The #MeToo movement which has caused many to re-evaluate behavior that once seemed acceptable, has, fortunately, given all women a chance to be vocal about how they want their bodies treated and that it is also showing people that they will be held accountable when they cross lines.

credit: Medium


Whether Vergara, who has been typecast as the spicy-Latina, cares or claims not to care about being objectified shouldn’t affect how men treat her and her body. While her previous comments have certainly raised eyebrows amongst feminists, they do not grant men like Ramsay say in how her body should be treated let alone mean that she should be groped or harassed. It remains to be seen whether Vergara will embrace the movement, but not doing so, doesn’t give anyone license to grope or harass her in the manner she was on “The Tonight Show.”

Check out the clip below.


Read: Gina Rodriguez Continues To Act As If Black Women Are Part Of The Problem

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Cardi B Shared Her Story Of Sexual Assault In An Emotional New Interview That You Have To Watch

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Cardi B Shared Her Story Of Sexual Assault In An Emotional New Interview That You Have To Watch

Iamcardib / Instagram

Cardi B appeared on the first episode of Untold Stories of Hip Hop, hosted by Angie “The Voice of New York” Martinez on WE TV. The series, debuting on WE TV on Sept. 26, will highlight hip hop heavyweights like Cardi B, Snoop Dogg, Fat Jow, and Queen Latifah and never-before-heard accounts that changed their lives and careers.

The first day of shooting was literally the day after the Grammys, so who better [to interview] than Cardi B?” Martinez told the NY Post. “She had just won that big Grammy for Best Rap Album and it was a huge moment for her. She’s a hustler. She really works hard. I’ve seen people go hard but she goes super hard. Her work ethic is really impressive.” 

Like most interviews with Cardi, the “Press” singer ebbs from her charming humor with The Bronx grit to getting real about her hustling, struggles, and political opinions. In this interview with Martinez, Cardi reveals she was sexually assaulted by a photographer. 

As seen in the promotional clip for Untold Stories of Hip Hop, Cardi B is visibly flustered as she recounts the incident.

Cardi B spoke with legendary radio DJ Angie Martinez about the incident that happened early in her career. She went to a magazine photoshoot where the photographer exposed himself to her. It appeared the photographer was trying to coerce sexual acts in exchange for media coverage.

“I’ll never forget how I went to shoot for this magazine and the photographer, he was trying to get close to me like, ‘Yeah, you want to get in this magazine?’” Cardi said. “Then he pulled his dick out. I was so fucking mad.”

Cardi said she told the owner of the magazine, the person did not care.

“You know what’s so crazy?” Cardi said. “I told the magazine owner and he just looked at me like: ‘So? And?'” 

When Martinez asked if these incidents still happen to her, Cardi essentially said no one would dare these days.

“Oh, hell no, I put you on blast on my Instagram,” Cardi said.

Cardi B has no doubt that sexual assault happens to girls in underprivileged communities every day. 

The 26-year-old believes that girls at high-risk neighborhoods experience assault all the time, but simply put: nobody cares.

“When I see the #MeToo movement – there’s girls from the hood I know that went through the same type of treatment. They make you feel like you got to do a certain type of thing. It happens every day.”

In 2017, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck said reports of sexual assault and domestic violence made by Latinx residents had decreased. The reason: they feared the risk of deportation under Trump’s immigration policy.

“Imagine, a young woman, imagine your daughter, your sister, your mother … not reporting a sexual assault, because they are afraid that their family will be torn apart,” Beck told the LA Times.

While the new immigration policy may have exacerbated these fears, they have always been present for the Latinx community. This makes it particularly hard to create an accurate picture of the frequency of sexual assault amongst Latinxs.

Moreover, because of how Black women are stigmatized as “hypersexualized,”according to Now.org, for every 15 black women who are raped, only one reports her assault.

Indigenous women also face disproportionately high levels of violence, according to Indian Law, 1 in 2 American Indian and Alaska Native women have experienced sexual violence.

The facts make it clear: women, in general, are disregarded when it comes to sexual assault, but women of color face even more barriers.

Cardi has previously expressed concerns the #MeToo movement is not inclusive.

The “Money” rapper has alluded to sexual harassment on set before. Cardi, who identifies as a feminist, told Cosmpolitan that because she is a stripper her opinions or experiences on more serious matters are often dismissed. While she supports the #MeToo movement (which was founded by Tarana Burke, a Black woman, but was hijacked by Alyssa Milano, a white woman) that women of color are not heard with regard to sexual assault.

“A lot of video vixens have spoke about this and nobody gives a fuck,” she says. “When I was trying to be a vixen, people were like, ‘You want to be on the cover of this magazine?’ Then they pull their dicks out. I bet if one of these women stands up and talks about it, people are going to say, ‘So what? You’re a ho. It don’t matter.’“

Cardi doesn’t accept the dismissals of strippers. While she is richer and more famous than ever, she said she was happier as a stripper. 

 “I don’t want to sound like I’m ungrateful, but it’s exhausting,” she says. “I love my career now, but it’s like my spirit was happier before. When I was dancing, I had so much fun. I felt powerful in the club. I felt free.”

What Cardi’s experiences highlight is how women of color, especially ones who dare to be overtly sexual, are perceived to be deserving recipients of any abuse they receive.

 

Eight Women Opened Up About Their Sexual Assault Experiences And How They Survived

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Eight Women Opened Up About Their Sexual Assault Experiences And How They Survived

Content Warning — The following stories share details of physical and sexual abuse that could be triggering to some readers. Discretion is advised.

If you’re a woman, there’s a certain amount of extra care you have to take in our world. That’s why we go to the bathroom in groups and buy things like mace and self dense tools just in case we find ourselves the targets of attack. The numbers tell us this is a very possible situation. Statistically, 1 in 6 women are victims of an attempted or completed rape. Additionally, 1 in 4 women are the victims of domestic abuse by a significant other.  

Whether physical or sexual assault, assault completed by a stranger or a loved one, the suffering caused by these actions are very real and can lead to a lifetime of pain. We can do a lot to prevent these attacks but one of the most important things we can do for survivors after the fact is to talk about it. Addressing this pain and celebrating the strength needed to continue on afterwards helps with the difficult healing process. 

With this in mind, we asked our FIERCE readers to open up to us and talk about these traumatic experiences. What they shared spoke of the strength and perseverance of the corazón femenino. Here’s what they had to say. 

1. Healing but stronger than ever!

Instagram / @_sexual_assault_survivors

“My stepfather’s granddad molested me from 3-5 years old. He would tell me that if I told my parents they would be angry at me, so I kept it silent until 1st grade when a school nurse briefly explained what inappropriate touching was. I told her everything [and] my parents/police were called. The next morning my abuser was on a flight back to his country. My family who was supposed to protect me, instead protected him. I am still healing but stronger than ever! I refuse to let that hurt inner child shape my life.” — @rosyyaret

2. Your abuse does not define you. 

Instagram / @_sexual_assault_survivors

“I was 4 and it was my older brother. I became incredibly depressed and suicidal in high school due to the fact that I was silenced. I dropped out as soon as I turned 18. It’s taken many years of removing toxic people from my life, self love and healing. I am now a mother of two beautiful girls, I graduated high school last year at the age of 25 and I am now set to graduate from college spring 2020 with a degree in Spanish, behavioral science and sociology. I’m currently working on all my UC applications and my life is mine, I reclaimed it.

I hope that these words help someone, anyone. Your abuse does not define you or dictate your life. It gets better and you’ve got a group of hermanas and hermanos out here rooting for you. My inbox is open to anyone in need of a listening ear.” — @lichalopez__

3. We can overcome anything.

Instagram / @_sexual_assault_survivors

“4-5 year old me playing at the yard and my grandma’s ahijado abused me. A friend (6 year old boy) saw what was going on and started knocking and kicking the door until he opened it and I could run away. Had to look at this guy for years nobody knew nothing until last year that I told my husband. I’m a proud Daughter of God, a mama bear and blessed wife. We girls can overcome anything 💪🏻💪🏻” — @yulia2401

4. You aren’t the one who should feel ashamed. 

Instagram / @_sexual_assault_survivors

“In 4th grade, I was sexually molested by 3 class mates of mine. They pinned me up against a wall lifted my skirt and touched me inappropriately. They got 1 week of ISS (In School Suspension), because they were “just being kids.” meaning I still had to see them every day. I couldn’t attend school for nearly a month after. I felt so ashamed and dirty, kids looked at me funny because the rumors had started after.” — @kisssinpink

5. Ridding your life of toxicity is self care.

Instagram / @sexualabuserecovery

“I was 9 years old and it was my Godfather, we were at a barbecue at their house. I told my Mom immediately after it happened, she walked me over to her sister (his wife), and asked me to tell her what I just told her. She then picked me up, called my Dad over and told him we had to go. She didn’t tell him til we got home, she was afraid of his reaction as a father. They called the police and pressed charges, during the police report the officers asked my Mom, “what was she wearing?”

My Dad said, “excuse me?! she’s 9!” “I have to ask”, the officer replied…

My parents never doubted me, and supported me, our entire family turned their backs on us for “calling the cops on family”. My parents decided to move far away from their toxicity and it’s been just us ever since. I hold a lot of resentment towards him and them, that day I lost my primos, tias, tios.” — @goddess_divine_515

6. Find your voice and use it.

Instagram / @sexualabuserecovery

“I was molested by my mom’s brother from 3-7 years old and felt dirty and carried shame all throughout my childhood. At 21 I was raped in college and it felt as if my whole world came crumbling down. I could no longer try and push down what happened. I got therapy and through it I found my voice. I now have a PhD, did my dissertation on the post traumatic growth of Chicana/Latina survivors of sexual assault, and am a psychologist that has supported other survivors. If you’re reading this and you’re a survivor too, know that it is never your fault. Find a therapist or tell someone you trust. It gets better, I promise. 💕”  — @biancayesss

7. Addressing what happened with yourself and others will be healing.

FIERCE/ wearemitu.com

“I was molested from age 5-9 by a family member. To this date I can’t even say who or speak his name but he passed away when I was 13. Up until a couple of years ago I thought I was stronger than what happened to me and I wouldn’t let that part of my life define me. And the fact that if I said anything, my whole family would fall apart, I couldn’t bare the thought of doing that to them. That’s what I repeated to myself over and over. Until I started losing grip on my emotions and realizing I couldn’t keep a healthy relationship. Girls seek help. I’m finally not too afraid to not do so.”

8. Learn what abuse means and no it’s not your fault.

justiceforourwomenza / Instagram

It took me nearly two years to say anything. I considered him a friend in high school and completely trusted him. I blamed myself for being alone with him, for “putting myself” in that situation. Sex was never the same after, but I thought it was just me, trying to be more “godly”.. Years later, I was in a sexual abuse prevention training and learned the different meanings of sexual abuse. No means No. Abuse is abuse. Please remember it was NEVER your fault, no matter what anyone else says.