Fierce

These Día De Los Muertos Inspired Tattoos Will Make You Want To Get Inked Right Away

As Fall begins to slowly cool the weather outside, we begin to think about the spooky season and all the things that come with it. It isn’t just Halloween that we’re looking forward to. We also have Día de  Los Muertos to anticipate. 

Observed by the people of central and south Mexico, The Day of the Dead is a celebration of ancestors and life on the other side of death. It has also become a holiday that has fed into our collective pop culture with images of its sugar skulls, marigolds and monarch butterflies. These images have worked their way into artwork and have especially become popular subjects of tattoos. 

With that in mind, we found some breathtaking Día de Los Muertos tattoos. Maybe they’ll inspire you to get some Day of the Dead ink as well. 

1. This watercolor beauty.

Instagram / @piotr.balcerak.tattoo

What makes this sketchy and bold tattoo brilliant is its watercolor style. Mimicking the freedom and flow that watercolor paintings have, watercolor tattoos venture outside line art to bleed color into the canvass. This intricate skull is a great example of this tattoo style. 

2. The OG skeleton prince.

Instagram / @somozaart

One of the most recognizable skull daddies gets a Día de Los Muertos makeover in this black and white tattoo. Jack Skeleton looks like a natural all decked out with common designs typically seen on sugar skulls. The skeleton might be the Pumpkin King but he looks like the King of the Dead in this tattoo.

3. *Mariachi music intensifies.*

Instagram / @yamambatattooshop

What’s more Mexican than authentic mariachi music? A mariachi skull musician. Dressed as a traditional mariachi, this skull comes complete with a sombrero and a guitar. We can just imagine him yelling a grito as he begins his next song.

4. Hummingbird of the dead.

Instagram / @carinathebarber

This tattoo captures the delicacy of one of Mexico’s most lovely creatures. This hummingbird takes flight on colorful wings and its boldly displayed skeleton against a Mayan background. 

5. Dia de Los Meowtos

Instagram / @necromandi 

Commemorating these cute little toe beans, this tattoo features a small calavera and a Mexican cempasúchil blossom. The Mexican cempasúchil or marigold is used on ofrendas and graves to honor departed ancestors.

6. Skeleton queen.

Instagram / @luckybirdtattoo

Besides calaveras, Día de Los Muertos tats often feature female sugar skulls. This one, for example, shows a skeleton beauty adorned with a crown of skulls, bones and marigold petals. 

7. A Mexican-American beauty.

Instagram /@sasquatch_linked

This sugar skull girl combines two cultures into one to show off a love of both countries. With roses in her hair that are colored to represent the Mexican and United States flags, this tattoo embodies its wearer’s Mexican-American identity.

8. This macabre mandala. 

Instagram / @shane.ryan.ink

Mandalas are a common element in tattoos. It’s a geometric figure representing the universe in Hindu and Buddhist symbolism. This mandala got a Day of the Dead upgrade with the addition of identical calaveras. 

9. An undead Disney princess. 

Instagram / @aevrard_

The guaranteed way to make a beloved figure even better is to give them the Día de las Muertos treatment. In this tattoo, Disney beauty Belle becomes a sugar skull girl and is adorned with a crown of flowers.

10. A sacred heart/skeleton combo.

Instagram / @richardpevahouse

The sacred heart is another identifiable subject in tattoos and is meant to symbolize the heart of Christ. This Day of the Dead calavera sports his own sacred heart, positively bursting from his chest in this dynamic piece.

11. Decked out in roses and jewels.

Instagram / @ink848

This tattoo takes a harsh subject matter a skull and makes it delicate and beautiful with the addition of jewelry and roses. The light gray shading gives it an even softer look. 

12. A Day of the Dead matruschka

Instagram / @dappertattoo

Here’s another collab between cultures with a Día de los Muertos matruschka. The Russian nesting doll is painted as an adorable sugar skull in a truly unique piece of artwork. 

13. Dia de Spidey.

Instagram / @gonzoetattoos

We might see this web slinger paroling the streets of Mexico City. Spider Man looks like a regular sugar skull with a few added decorations to his mask. 

14. *A wild Cubone appeared!*

Instagram / @missmarilyn_tattoos

Since this Pokémon already comes with his own skull helmet, it seems only naturally for it to be decorated for Day of the Dead. This tattoo is extremely creative and is definitely an unforgettable bit of art. 

15. A stylized Catrina.

Instagram / @peco_wolftown 

 La Calavera Catrina has become an icon of the Day of the Dead since she was first etched by Mexican artist José Guadalupe Posada back in 1910. This tattoo offers Catrina a modern makeover. Her blank stare is positively eerie and give us major creepy vibes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ygZXhDiueo

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We Asked What Being Latino Meant To You And Your Responses Were Inspirational AF

Culture

We Asked What Being Latino Meant To You And Your Responses Were Inspirational AF

What does being Latine mean to you? That’s the question that we asked our Instagram community and their responses really got us thinking.

There is so much to love about being Latino – from our community and our familia, to our cultura and our resilience, our drive to be better and work harder to reach not just our dreams, but the dreams of our pápis and our abuelos too. There is no single definition of what being Latino/Latina/Latine means, and, as expected, where we fall on the Latinidad spectrum varies depending on each one of us. That being said, there is no wrong way to be a Latino or to feel Latinidad, and we hope that these answers give you the courage to accept it, embrace it, and carry it proudly.

But first, the response that left our jaw on the floor:

“I consider myself Indigenous Latinx. I have a trilingual experience growing up with listening and speaking a mixture of Mixtec, Spanish and English #indigenouslatinx” – @jeanettejaguar.

Wow Jeanette! That is so beautiful, thank you for sharing with us. If you ever want to talk to us about your Mixtec cultura and your upbringing let us know, we’re all ears!

Being Latine means embracing the skin you’re in…

“Being a Latino means I’m beautifully brown.” – @pepelokz

“Means brown is beautiful! Was taught at a young age the girls who had brown skin, brown eyes, and brown hair like me were the prettiest. 💕” – @_cynnreneerose

…and not letting anyone tell you how you should or shouldn’t feel.

“It means being unapologetically brown and proud and not letting other oppress our culture and beliefs 👏🏽” – @_ottootto_

“always persevering and continuously learn about ones culture or cultures as to not repeat the same mistakes of the past! I’m a proud Mutt of Mexican born parents! Never have I denied my culture and being what I am I would gladly die fighting then on my knees ✊🏼🇲🇽” – @immanuel_rosa

Some people have trouble feeling accepted

“Ni de aquí, ni de allá” – @marcela.nog19

“Being a Latina is being unsure if it’s okay to claim being Latina. It means fear of being rejected by both cultures that make up my being. It means to laugh at myself as being white wash so that i can pretend it doesn’t hurt when I hear from family and friends around me. It means to constantly be looking for my roots because neither groups want to claim me.” – @miszjean

First of all, whoever made you feel like you weren’t enough is projecting their own beliefs onto you! You said it yourself, both cultures make up your being. You are not either/or, you are BOTH, and that’s something that’s within you, regardless of what other people have to say. Do whatever makes you feel more secure in your identity; if it’s not knowing enough about your cultura that you are self conscious of, all the knowledge in the world is just a Google search away. There’s always going to be people telling you what to do and how you should feel, but that’s their problem, you are supported and loved and you are accepted just the way you are, and if you don’t think so, keep reading to check out Ana Martinez’s answer a little further below.

“Well I feel like I am not living up the standards of being resilient. I am struggling to get my career or studies done, I just feel overwhelmed about the pressures of being an immigrant, disabled, and with chronic issues. I don’t know how my grandma did it coming from a indentured farming family to a businesswoman in her prime time in Mexico- considering that she was not a white woman or a criollo or from a rich family. I am very tired of fighting. I am exhausted. I don’t think I represent anything of Latinx/Latina/Latine, but my grandma DOES represent that. 🇲🇽🌻” – @pandapanda_26

It’s not fair for us to compare our obstacles and challenges to those of anyone else, especially our parents’ and abuelos’. Granted, sometimes it’s hard not to, especially when we consider the lives they led and the sacrifices they were forced to make along the way, but we’re never going to feel like what we do is enough if we’re always comparing ourselves to them. It’s hard not to feel intimidated when things seem to go wrong or when things get tough but mija, you’re doing amazing! Growth is hard and uncomfortable and sometimes we fall but the most important thing is that we pick ourselves up and keep going. That’s exactly what we saw when we read your response: someone who has overcome many challenges and is tired af but is still here, growing and learning and echandole ganas. Think about a time when you overcame something you thought you wouldn’t. See? You can do anything as long as you actually try, your abuelita’s blood is in you, and you cannot fail. *Sending you a big virtual hug*

There is so much of Latinidad to be proud of.

“Being super proud!” – @sarahi_rueda

“Being Latina means being proud of your culture, and being a princess and a warrior.” – @j98oo

“What being Latina means to me: you have the upmost knowledge and first hand experience of struggles( it be family, self, work) getting by just to stay afloat(financially, emotionally, physically) but most importantly the exposure and lessons embedded in us by our adult leaders(parents/ guardians/grandparents) in our life. But on the other side of that coins what makes us Latinas unique is beside all of the above we still are shown how to hard workers, humble, and resilient.” – @tati_rivas90

“It means I love to dance. It means family will always be the most important thing in the world to me. It means I might sound like a gringa to some pero the spanish comes out real quick when im angry, smitten by a cute dog, or in other situations I better not say. It means I belong to a group of people they act like they can’t see. It means I have to explain myself to my white boyfriend over and over again. It means every time I go back home to miami a part of me that’s always empty gets filled. It means vallenatos, mi abuelita, My finca in colombia, the navidades that can never be the same again ❤️” – @saraamayaaa

At the end of the day, remember that where we are born does not determine who we are.

“It means that just because we were born in the 🇺🇸.. being children of a Mexican immigrants… we are Latinos” – @anamartinez67

We hope that you are feeling just as inspired by these responses as we are.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Barbie Is Doing Día De Muertos Once Again In 2020 And Twitter Has Something To Say About It

Culture

Barbie Is Doing Día De Muertos Once Again In 2020 And Twitter Has Something To Say About It

Barbie / Mattel, Inc

Mexico’s famed Día de Muertos celebrations are coming up, the time of year when families honor their dead relatives with ofrendas, parades, visits to cemeteries, and many other festivities.

And, of course, Barbie wasn’t going to miss out on the celebrations.

Mattel – which makes Barbie – has just launched a new Barbie Catrina that is much more festive and colorful than the first one last year, who was dressed in black.

On this occasion, Mattel worked with Mexican-American designer Javier Meabe who wanted to reflect the joy and deep-rooted traditions of the country.

“As a Mexican-American designer, it was important for me to use my creative voice to design a doll that celebrates the bright colors and vivid textures of my culture, as well as the traditions I grew up with that are represented and celebrated in Barbie,” Meaba said in a statement from Mattel. 

Although, Mattel has enlisted the designs of a Mexican-American designer, not everyone is pleased with the launch. Some are worried that the entire Día de Muertos collection is potentially watering down a 3,000-year-old tradition and are accusing Barbie of cultural appropriation.

Barbie is releasing its second Día de Muertos doll and it’s generating plenty of buzz.

For the second year in a row, Mattel is launching a Día de Muertos Barbie modeled after the traditions of Mexico’s famed celebrations.

“We often look at different ways to continue to engage girls and families to gain knowledge and celebrate other cultures and other parts of the world,” Michelle Chidoni, a spokeswoman for the company, said. “Our hope is for this Día de Muertos Barbie to honor the holiday for the millions that celebrate and to introduce people not familiar with the tradition to the rich meaning.”

This year’s doll was designed by Mexican American designer Javier Meabe who was inspired by his personal background and family traditions.

“It was very important that the second Dia De Muertos doll felt just as special as the first in the Barbie series,” said Meabe in a statement. “As a Mexican American Designer, it was important to me to use my creative voice to design a doll that celebrates the bright colors and vivid textures of my culture, as well, as have the traditions I grew up with represented and celebrated in Barbie.”

He continued, “For this doll, I was inspired by the color gold seen throughout Mexican culture, jewelry, buildings, statues and artwork and highlighted it throughout the design. The roses represent emotions and moments in life including celebrations, birth, death, passion, and love and I also was inspired to introduce new textures and a new dress silhouette.”

Barbie lovers can buy the doll for $75 on the company’s website or at mass retailers such as Amazon, Target and Walmart.

Last year marked the first time Barbie celebrated the iconic Mexican holiday.

Credit: Barbie / Mattel, Inc

Last year, Mattel released the first Barbie doll celebrating the Mexican holiday Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead), and it was a huge hit. The floral dress and headpiece on the doll combined with the traditional calavara makeup design was absolutely stunning, and the same can be said about the 2020 version that just launched.

This time around, the Barbie Dia de Muertos doll features a light, blush-colored lace dress over a layer embroidered with floral and skeleton accents. The intricacy of the makeup has been taken up a notch, and the “golden highlights in her hair shimmer beneath a crown of skeleton hands holding roses and marigolds.”

However, since last year many have been questioning the intentions of Barbie and whether or not this is a good move.

In Mexican culture, the Día de Muertos — or Day of the Dead — is when the gateway between the living and the dead is said to open, a holiday during which the living honor and pay respects to loved ones who have died.

The new Día de Muertos Barbie was intended less as a portal into the realm of the dead and more as a gateway into Mexican culture. At least that is what Mattel is hoping for.

However, not everyone agrees. Latinx Twitter has lit up with both excitement and anger, with some folks appreciating the design while others are calling Mattel out for cultural appropriation. The Día de Muertos doll is another way Latinx culture is slowly entering the mainstream. With acclaimed shows like Vida and One Day at a Time and movies like Coco and Roma winning accolades — it seems even a toy company is looking to capitalize on Latinx culture

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