Fierce

Some Of Your Most Beloved Beauty Brands Are Donating Generous Amounts Of Money To Help Stop The Amazon Rainforest Fires

There’s no doubt that by now you’ve seen the dozens of harrowing images and videos flooding your timelines of the fires destroying the Amazon rainforest in Brazil. According to the National Institue for Space Research (INPE) in Brazil, data suggests that there has been an 84% increase in the rate of deforestation since the previous year in 2018. These fires, according to INPE, are even visible from space. Let that sink in. There’s no turning our backs now on this issue or on the indigenous communities these fires are directly affecting as well. 

While people continue to share the devastating images, others are doing something more tangible. Beauty brands and other celebrities have taken to social media to use their platform for good and to ignite change, mobilizing their followers to donate to organizations that have been fighting for mother nature and more specifically indigenous land in the Amazon for years. 

Here are 7 brands that are donating money and proceeds from sales of their products to help stop the Amazon rainforest fires. 

1. Tata Harper Skincare

Last week when images of the Amazon rainforest went viral, Tata Harper took to Instagram to not only share the images but also to announce that 15% of online sales would be donated to Rainforest Alliance –– an organization that works year-round to conserve the Amazon and defends it against illegal logging, destructive slash-and-burn agriculture, and other threats. For example, the current threats coming from Brazil’s president. In case you didn’t already know, Tata Harper is also a Latinx-owned natural skincare product brand. 

2. Sunday Riley

Earlier this week, skincare brand Sunday Riley also announced their pledge to help with the Amazon rainforest fires. For the next two weeks, they wrote in an Instagram caption, they will match donations (up to $500 per person or organization) to a number of charities including Amazon Conservation, Amazon Conservation Team, Amazon Watch, Rainforest Foundation, Rainforest Trust, and Rainforest Action Network. 

In order to get your donation matched by Sunday Riley, they are suggesting folks simply donate to any of the listed charities, email the official donation confirmation to hello@sundayriley.com, and make sure you’re signed up to their email list so they can confirm where you’re a client and/or reader. After that, they’ll confirm the email address and match your donation. 

3.  Moon Juice

Last week, Moon Juice asked their followers to help spread the word and help them raise $2,500 to protect the Amazon rainforest. “There have been 73,000 fires in the Brazilian Amazon since the beginning of this year––an 83% increase over the same period last year. The Amazon rainforest generates over 20% of the world’s oxygen and is a major factor in surviving climate change. It’s also home to 3 million species of plants, animals, and 1 million indigenous people,” Moon Juice wrote on their caption. 

In order to help them meet their goal of $2,5000 for Amazon relief, they asked their followers to repost this to their stories and tag @moonjuice along with 5 friends – in doing so, they’d donate $1 to Amazon Watch organization – which help to protect the rainforest and the rights of indigenous folks in the Amazon Basin. 

4. B3 Balm

Last week, B3 Balm took to Instagram to show their support for Amazon relief. “The world is literally burning and while I sadly can’t distinguish the flames, I can try and help protect what we have left and help the incredible wildlife that is here and that to me is not only helping our beautiful planet, but it’s helping each and every one of us while we are here,” they wrote in the caption. 

B3 Balm is pledging 100% of its profits from selling a “Save the Amazon Package” that includes three of their products. The profits will go toward the Rain Forest Trust and WWF International through September and while supplies last. 

5. Cardea AuSet

This plant-based skin-care and wellness brand is donating 20% of all profits from its website sales through September 1 to Amazon Watch. Amazon Watch is a non-profit that partners with indigenous and environmental organizations to advocate for, protect, and preserve the Amazon rainforest. 

6. Rahua

Amazon beauty brand Rahua took to Instagram to announce that they had partnered with the Land is Life organization which directly works with the Confederation of the Brazilian Amazon to support the indigenous-led, “Fire Brigades” currently fighting to stop the Amazon rainforest fires. 

The plant-powered and rainforest grown brand will be donating an extra 10% of all sale proceeds to the Land Is Life organization. 

7. Pacifica Beauty

Pacifica Beauty is also fighting to stop the Amazon rainforest fires by donating 5% of all sales through September 1 to the Amazon Conservation. “Help us help the Amazon,” they wrote in their Instagram caption. “Tag a friend/share on page or in story and help spread the news, let’s do something.” They also shared other ways people can help the deforestation of the Amazon rainforest. 

But brands haven’t been the only ones donating to the Amazon forest relief efforts – celebrities have also joined the cause. 

From simply sharing ways to help and donate money to organizations working to help the Amazon rainforest, celebrities like actor Leonardo DiCaprio, Vanessa Hudgens, Lana Condor, and Camila Mendes have donated money to relief efforts. 

According to Insider, Vanessa Hudgens donated to the Amazon Conservation Team, “Umbrella Academy,” star Robert Sheehan made a monthly donation to the Rainforest Alliance, “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” star Lana Condor also gave money to the Rainforest Alliance, “Riverdale” star Camila Mendes also donated to the same organization aforementioned, and Leonardo DiCaprio’s environmental initiative called Earth Alliance pledged $5 million to Amazon relief. Other celebrities have donated money as well.

It’s great to see brands and celebrities alike giving back to the community when necessary and using their platform for the greater good.   

5 Makeup Looks From Your Favorite Telenovelas That Look Just As Fire Now As They Did 15 Years Ago

Fierce

5 Makeup Looks From Your Favorite Telenovelas That Look Just As Fire Now As They Did 15 Years Ago

Canal de las Estrellas

Telenovelas are life. For a lot of us, these daytime shows were a part of our lives since childhood, and let’s face it, every time we visit mom or abuela, even now, we’re bound to gather around the TV and watch the drama du jour unfold. But it’s not just about the drama though, it’s the sex appeal, the glam, the over-the-top costumes and mansions —and the galán.

These daytime soaps are the perfect blend of beautiful people, intensely physical scenes and the lyrical drama of the Spanish language in all its romantic splendor.

Telenovelas are more than just drama, for a lot of kids these shows were a source of fashion and style growing up.

credit Instagram @telenovelasfans

But Telenovelas aren’t necessarily just about love and lust, they’re a source of trends of both beauty and fashion. There’s a reason why the cliché about Latina women being glamorous at all costs, is alive and well —it’s a major unspoken theme in just about every piece of Latin-American pop culture. 

There are so many things these shows teach us about makeup. There’s always a protagonist —who might be a little passive and a goody-two-shoes. There’s the evil antagonist —probably a bat-shit crazy evil lady. And then there’s the love interest —a wildly good-looking human, who most of the time happens to be a millionaire; and they all have their own, unique makeup looks that set them apart. The greatest thing about all of them though is that these dramatic characters weren’t just people we watched on the show, for most of us Latinx growing up watching them, they served as our first source of fashion and beauty inspiration. They all had their signature looks and you’d be lying if you said you were never inspired by Mia Colucci’s pink-hued glittery glam or Belinda’s masterful Silvana Del Valle and her signature red hair and pigtails.

So, are you a good girl, with a protagonist-worthy glow and perfectly coiffed hair? Or a bold, red-lipped bad girl? No matter who you want to channel today, Telenovelas have looks for everyone. So we went ahead and rounded up our favorite Telenovela glam looks that you can recreate in 2019 and will look just as fire now as they did way back then:

1. Mia Colucci from Rebelde

credit Instagram @miacoluccistar

The rich and popular but very spoiled Mia Colucci aka. Mexican Regina George, was a style icon for every Telenovela-watching teen in the early 00s. We chose her makeup because it’s very simple, dewy and glowy, basically the original Glossier no-makeup makeup look. Recreate the shimmery pink eye shadow look with Lime Crime’s iridescent Diamond Dew shadow in Rose Goals.  Go crazy with your highlighter and blush, we recommend Fenty Beauty’s Killawatt highlighter in Wattabrat for a pink shimmer or in Lightning Dust/Fire for a more pearlescent finish.  Finish off the look with a pink lipgloss, we’d go for the most iconic pink gloss of 2019, Nars’ Orgasm.

2. The queen of evil herself; Rubí

credit Instagram @rubisincera

Of course, we had to include the baddest of them all, the original gold-digger Rubí. This bombshell’s glam is nothing short of iconique. The bouncy hair, the full lips, and perfectly delineated eyebrows…swoon. We were almost more obsessed with her than we were with heartthrob Sebastian Rulli who played galán de galanes, Héctor Ferrer. The beautiful anti-hero’s makeup look was just as trendy in 2004 as it is now in 2019 —fifteen years later! The red lip, wispy lashes, dark brows, and perfect complexion are every beauty vloggers’ dream. So to do it yourself we say, you can’t go wrong with the classic Ruby Woo lippy for that crimson-red Rubí pout (it does carry our heroine’s name after all). Sculpt your brows with cult favorite Anastasia Beverly Hills’ Dip Brow Pomade. And obviously go crazy with the falsies —blow-out strongly encouraged.

3. Marimar – Costeñita soy, con mis abuelos crecí yo.

credit Instagram @Diosathalia

Marimar was the story of a poor girl who lived by the ocean with her grandparents. She was sun-kissed, her hair had the perfect beachy waves, she was basically a beautiful Latina mermaid and we stan. Yes, granted, her makeup didn’t require much production —this character might’ve been the very precursor of the beachy-makeup trend way back in 1994. To get her mermaid-worthy hair, a Surf Styling Cream which adds texture and gives you that salt-water wavy finish would do wonders. Add a dark, copper-hued bronzer to ace the beach girl tan. And for the lips? Choose a matte, velvety lipstick to get the classic 90s nude lip, may we suggest Urban Decay’s Vice lipstick in the shade fuel? You won’t regret it.

4.  Jade from ‘El Clon’

Jade was every Latinx kid’s favorite middle-eastern beauty growing up, her and fellow gem-stone babe Jasmine, but we’re not focusing on Disney here. The Brazilian Telenovela ‘El Clon’ had all the best elements of the genre, love triangles, twins separated at birth, evil villains, lots of eyeliner, genetic experiments —nope, not kidding— and it all took place in the beautiful land of Morocco, needless to say, there was a lot of kohl involved. We loved the over-the-top styling, and even more over-the-top makeup looks on Jade. 

Trying to recreate her signature eyeliner might be complicated, to say the least. But with a lot of patience and a few Q-tips, we’re sure you’ll get there. Give it a go with a highly-pigmented and super precise pencil, Le Crayon Khôl eyeliner from Lancôme, might be your best ally to achieve a similar shape to the one Jade wore most of the time. For the rest of the look, she always wore natural tones, so add a dark brown eyeshadow on your lids and finish off with a matte nude lipstick of your choice. 

5. Soraya Montenegro from María la del Barrio

Credit Instagram @balmorepadilla06

“¿Qué haces besando a la lisiada?” has turned into the meme of an entire generation. Naturally, whenever there’s a conversation about Telenovelasevil mistress Soraya Montenegro simply must be involved. There will never be a more iconic villain than the woman who bitch-slapped an innocent girl in a wheelchair and murdered the sweet old lady who took care of la lisiada. 

Soraya sported the most perfect 90s hair flippin’ blowout there’s ever been, so we can’t recommend anything other than an appointment at the nearest hairstyling salon to emulate the look. As far as makeup goes, you have to choose an earth-toned lipstick like a deep brown or a warm terracotta like NYX’s velvet lipstick in the shade Berlin to get the super-villain pout. Add some statement clip-on earrings and a lot of sass, and you’re ready to kick some ass.

The Faces Of The Amazon: Here Are Some Of The Tribes Threatened By Brazil’s Dangerous Policies

Culture

The Faces Of The Amazon: Here Are Some Of The Tribes Threatened By Brazil’s Dangerous Policies

midaugust2002 / angieviaja / Instagram

The recent fires in the Amazonian rainforest put this region under the spotlight. Most of the conversations revolved around the ecological damage that the catastrophic fires produced and the corruption that led to unscrupulous land clearings. However, there was a direct human cost as well. Various indigenous groups that have been decimated since their first encounter with European invaders are now facing the threat of illegal industries and governments, such as the Bolsonaro administration in Brazil. The destruction of natural resources is not the only threat they face. They are also at risk of losing their cultural and religious identity as they are forced to learn Spanish or Portuguese and evangelization efforts are stronger than ever from many denominations.

Here are some of the indigenous peoples that call the Amazon their home. Please do us un favorcito: if you visit the Amazon and encounter some of the original owners of the land, please approach them with the dignity and respect you would like to be treated with. Don’t go back home calling them “exotic” or “weird.” If you want to photograph them, please be respectful and ask for permission. 

The Amazon is home to indigenous communities that have survived traumatic processes of colonization by the Spanish and the Portuguese and then the mistreatment by governments that fail to protect their lands.

Credit: evajimenez84 / Instagram

The original owners of the land of what is now the Amazon in Brazil, Venezuela, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Bolivia, and Guyana have a millenary relationship to the land and knowledge of the rhythms of nature from which we could all learn. However, they have historically been underestimated and controlled by governments and institutions that see them with a mestizo gaze.

Waorani peoples in Ecuador

Credit: javhux / Instagram

They are also known as Waos and they are an Amerindian group that has marked differences with other indigenous Ecuadorians like the Quechua. Their community is relatively small: about 4,000 individuals who live between the Curaray and Napo Rivers. They were a hunting and gathering society and now have to live in settlements due to the threats of oil exploitation and illegal logging, two practices that have decimated their lands. They speak Huaorani, which has no known relationship to any other language. 

The Waorani might be small in numbers, but they are combative and have recently filed court cases claiming the protection of their lands.

Credit: coppercolored1876 / Instagram

The Waorani have stood up for their rights recently, as the Ecuadorian government attempts to take control of their lands. As reported by U-Wire: “The legal battle over the rainforest was filed by the Waorani people in February. through the Ecuadorian parliament. Ecuador had been auctioning off blocks of the forest for logging or mineral extraction to international companies. According to Reuters, the tribe had been battling an on-going court case concerning the selling of sacred Amazonian lands to oil companies”. 

Yanomami peoples in Venezuela and Brazil

Credit: theghostdance / Instagram

This group is made up of approximately 35,000 people who live in the border of Venezuela and Brazil. There are between 200 and 250 Yanomami villages today. They practice shamanism, just like many indigenous Amazonian tribes that hold a spiritual bond with the flora, fauna, and soil on which they live. 

By the way, the lives of the Yanomami are currently being threatened by illegal mining operations.

Credit: theghostdance / Instagram

According to the BBC, “ there are ‘thousands’ of prospectors operating in the Yanomami indigenous land in Roraima.” The Yanomami have historically survived numerous threats, but their current situation is close to catastrophic due to lack of government protection under the Bolsonaro presidency in Brazil.

Tucano peoples in Brazil and Colombia

Credit: midaugust2002 / Instagram

The Tucano people live in the northwestern Amazon, alongside the Vaupes River. They are made up of different tribes. They have a particular linguistic practice: no man can marry a woman who speaks his language. This practice creates a network of linguistic exchange that is quite unique in the world. Rather than an ethnic group with a distinct identity, the Tucano is a group of tribes put under an umbrella term for being geographically close. 

Ticuna peoples in Brazil, Colombia, and Peru

Credit: carosanchezposada / Instagram

They are the most numerous tribe in the Brazilian Amazon with a population of approximately 36,000 individuals. There are about 6,000 Ticuna in Colombia and 7,000 in Peru. They only marry and procreate within their ethnic group, which makes them quite distinct from other groups. They also practice shamanism. Most of them are fluent in Spanish or Portuguese and some of them have converted to Christianity as there are strong evangelization efforts in their region. 

The Ticuna have suffered a lot since colonial times when they came in contact with the Portuguese.

Credit: angieviaja / Instagram

During the 19th century they were used as slaves by the rubber cultivation industry. They have subsequently suffered violence from loggers, fishermen and other groups that try to exploit their lands. They are currently facing another threat that has decimated indigenous populations throughout Latin America: drug cartels. As EFE News Service reported in June 2017: “Near the triple border of Peru, Brazil, and Colombia, many members of the Ticuna Indian tribe are working as laborers for cocaine drug traffickers, a business that has transformed their lives and supplanted the activities and customs that some of them are now trying to salvage by returning to legal pursuits”. It has been hard for many Ticuna to go back to legal crops since the gains minuscule compared to coca crops. 

Secoya peoples in Ecuador and Peru

Credit: hannelore.vendenbussche / Instagram

They are also known as AngoteroEncabelladoHuajoyaPiojéSiekopai. They speak Pai Coca and could be considered part of the Tucanoan group. They are a very small group compared to the Ticuna. There are about 400 Secoyas in Ecuador and 700 in Peru. Their culture is being decimated (some have the nerve to call this “assimilation” as if it was a positive thing) by the presence of oil companies, missionaries who convert them to Christianity and mestizos who occupy their lands. 

Cubeo peoples in Colombia

Credit: mrjhonfredy / Instagram

The name “Cubeo” is a Spanish name used to call a group that calls themselves “people” (pâmiwâ) or “my people” (jiwa). They live in the Northwestern Amazon, alongside the Vapues river. There are between 3,000 and 5,000 Cubeo individuals. The Cubeo people, despite their low numbers, are outspoken when it comes to environmental matters. As CE Noticias Financieras reported back in 2018, a Cubeo representative told an assembly of European authorities: “It is not fair that we are looking for solutions to climate change and we are not thinking about how to protect the true forest keepers, who are us, the indigenous people”. That is absolutely right: the original owners of the land are the true and most knowledgeable when it comes to understanding the rhythms of nature and the best ways to protect it. 

Long story short, we better start listening to indigenous communities. They know the earth and its resources better than we do.

Credit: @AFrontlines / Twitter

Amazonians are fighting for the planet, not just for themselves. The idea that their future is also our future is absolutely right: the original owners of the land are the true and most knowledgeable when it comes to understanding the rhythms of nature and the best ways to protect it.

READ: Brazil Finally Banned Burning In The Amazon Yet 4,000 New Fires Have Started In Last 48 Hours