Things That Matter

The SATs Have A Problematic And Racist History Fueled By The Creator Of The Test Who Praised Eugenics And Racial Separation

The college scandal of 2019 —thanks to Aunt Becky and her wealthy cohorts— is just a recent look at how privileged people can easily change the outcome of tests and admissions only by forking money over to do so. Academic-based bribery is hardly a new scheme in the admissions process and the ways in which the system has become intricately rigged to keep out minorities is only just beginning to gain exposure. Minorities and low-income people are marginalized when it comes to admissions, test scores, and the workplace — it’s a system that continuously unbalances society.

When it comes to the SATs, an assessment test meant to categorize students solely on academic merit, this truth is no different.

The original intention behind the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) is to show where a student stands among their peers, to indicate what their next educational move should be.

The SATs date back to the mid-1920s.

Carl C. Brigham, a psychology professor at Princeton University whose early writings strongly influenced the eugenics movement and anti-immigration legislation in the United States, created the SAT for College Board in 1926. Brigham proposed and produced the test after make observations that he said proved “American education is declining and will proceed with an accelerating rate as the racial mixture becomes more and more extensive.”

According to PBS, the College Board “puts him in charge of a committee to develop a test that could be used by a wider group of schools.” And “In 1926 the SAT is administered to high school students for the first time.”

However, the wording as to why students had to take the SATs in the first place is marred with racial discrimination.

The SATs came during an immigration wave, and college boards and universities wanted to define who would be allowed in. The test doesn’t necessarily attest to who is smarter but more extensive information about the student, their race, and economic background. And yet, college admissions board do not consider this a factor in their admissions process. Proving that in a deeply flawed and unequal educational system, where segregation is still alive and well, colleges and education systems continue to fail students of color and those who are not. After all, research has shown that diversity in school’s only further benefits students, particularly in fields that are related to critical thinking and problem-solving.

The truth is that high-stakes standardized tests work in ways that reinforce racist and discriminatory systems of old. Continuing to accept notions that standardize tests are merit-based only perpetuate the race and class gaps reflected in their results.

Now the SATs will include an “adversity rating” that will allow colleges to know the school that a student came from to evaluate them in a more fair way.

The rating — 1 to 100 — would help the college board (who own the SATs) understand a student’s quality of education based on the neighborhood, the school’s economic standing, and other relevant information. So, if a student doesn’t do very well on the SATs, the rating would reveal as to the hardships that student endured. The rating does not include information about their race, but more so the economic struggles.

Some people feel that the “adversity rating” is something people could take advantage of by lying about where they live.

For example, if a parent knows that their child may not do well on the SATs they could lie about where they live to get a better adversity rating. This would help them achieve a better score.

“The idea that ‘this is a great SAT score for someone from your neighborhood, for someone of your background’ — it’s not fair to the students,” Venkates Swaminathan, a college admissions consultant told The Washington Post.

Others say the “adversity rating” will be a significant boost to go alongside affirmative action.

“Merit is all about resourcefulness,” David Coleman, chief executive of the College Board, said to the New York Times. “This is about finding young people who do a great deal with what they’ve been given. It helps colleges see students who may not have scored as high, but when you look at the environment that they have emerged from, it is amazing.”

People Are Freaking Out About The High-Pitched Character Danny Trejo, AKA Machete, Voices In The New “Dora The Explorer” Movie

Entertainment

People Are Freaking Out About The High-Pitched Character Danny Trejo, AKA Machete, Voices In The New “Dora The Explorer” Movie

Dora The Explorer / Nickelodeon

“Dora the Explorer” isn’t the same little bilingual cartoon girl anymore. In the live action sequel, “Dora and the Lost City of Gold,” we get to see Dora venture into high school and navigate life as a pretty eccentric, curious teenager. The latest trailer for the movie, which hits theaters in less than a month, just dropped and we all have opinions.

The cast looks incredible. Eva Longoria and Michael Peña play Dora’s parents. Danny Trejo will be playing the unnervingly high-pitched voice of Boots the Monkey. Benicio del Toro will play the voice of Swiper the Fox (“Swiper, no swiping!”). We also expect to see Eugenio Derbez offer his talents alongside new talents Isabela Moner and Jeff Wahlberg.

Peruvian actress Isabela Moner is taking on the role of Dora.

Credit: @isabelmoner / Instagram

At just 18 years old, Moner was born in Cleveland, Ohio. While her mom is from Lima, Peru, Moner didn’t start learning English until she reached grade school. By the time she was 15 years old, she was accepted into college. You might recognize her from Nickelodeon’s 100 Things to Do Before High School or Legends of the Hidden Temple. She was also cast in Transformers: The Last Night. Playing Dora will be her biggest role to date.

The trailer shows hilarious scenes of a young Dora at the family dinner table asking the screen, “Can you say delicioso?”

Credit: FilmIsNow Movie Trailers / YouTube

We all know Dora as the all-too-patient Spanish language teacher from our childhood who would pause for 10-15 seconds to let the audience practice saying words like “niño” and “delicioso.”

In the trailer, her parents look around the room, concerned, and brush the behavior off as just a phase.

Credit: FilmIsNow Movie Trailers / YouTube

Eva Longoria and Michael Peña characters look around the room, wondering who their daughter is talking to. Finally, Peña’s character comforts his wife saying, “she’ll grow out of it.” Thankfully, she does.

While Dora isn’t trying to teach us all Spanish anymore, she’s still as curious as her younger cartoon self.

Credit: FilmIsNow Movie Trailers / YouTube

After spending most of her life in the jungle with her parents, Dora’s parents send her to live with her cousin Diego, in the city. At first, Dora thinks she’s heading off on her greatest adventure yet: high school.

Of course, no girl can go off to high school without their best friend.

Credit: FilmIsNow Movie Trailers / YouTube

For Dora, that best friend is still a monkey she keeps in her backpack. Ultimately, high school isn’t her greatest adventure. Dora quickly becomes wrapped up in a mystery to find the Lost City of Gold, uncover truths about an ancient Incan civilization and save her parents.

Some fans are most excited just to see Eva Longoria back on the big screen.

Credit: @janefnoda / Twitter

We’re all shimmying, verdad, to see so many actually Latino actors play Latino characters in such a big production. We applaud the white director of this film adaptation for doing right by true cultural representation.

Some fans are praying to see the awkwardness of baby Dora in live action.

Credit: @DonZolidis / Twitter

You will see it, and thankfully, we’ll be fully emotionally supported by Eva Longoria and Michael Peña in the genuine disturbance it causes. We’re moving on from this strange character trait.

Meanwhile, other Spanish speakers are taking a moment to express some latent cringe from listening to grammatically correct Spanish.

Credit: @curlydash / Twitter

That Spanish is so overrated. Some might even say criminal. If you read that last word in Spanish, you probably can relate to what Curly Dash is saying. But we’re all showing out for the movie, dale?

Of course, the racists came out to play. 🙃

Credit: @HostisHumaniGen / Twitter

White folks are still upset that Disney chose to correct some blatant racism in the original screenplay of Little Mermaid by casting a black woman to play Ariel. If you’re using the term “reverse racism,” you’re already wrong. Basta. 

If you always wanted to see a school bus eat Dora’s backpack, show out August 9th.

Credit: FilmIsNow Movie Trailers / YouTube

We love seeing confident, capable young women stay true to their roots and strengths and lead a bunch of teenagers into a jungle to solve impossible Incan mysteries. Can you say, emocionado?

READ: The First Trailer For ‘Dora And The Lost City Of Gold’ Is Here And People Are Surprised And Ready

Bad Bunny And Ricky Martin Killed A ‘Religious Freedom’ Bill In Puerto Rico Furthering LGBTQ+ Rights In The Caribbean

Things That Matter

Bad Bunny And Ricky Martin Killed A ‘Religious Freedom’ Bill In Puerto Rico Furthering LGBTQ+ Rights In The Caribbean

badbunnypr / ricardorossello / ricky_martin / Instagram

Governors in the U.S. have tried and failed multiple times to enshrine discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community by passing “religious freedom” bills. At the heart of these bills is the idea that someone’s religion is enough to discriminate against those of different faiths, sexual orientations, and gender identities. Puerto Rico tried to follow the same failed path as Indiana and the backlash was swift and victorious after Ricky Martin and Bad Bunny (Benito Martinez) spoke out against the bill forcing Governor Ricardo Rosselló to backtrack on his bill to discriminate.

In April, Puerto Rico’s Governor Ricardo Rosselló presented the Puerto Rican House of Representatives a “religious freedom” bill.

Credit: @lgbtpr / Twitter

The bill was months in the making and Gov. Rosselló showed his full support for the bill, House Bill 2069. The bill would have allowed for government employees to openly discriminate against people who went against their religious beliefs.

Ricky Martin spoke up against the measure and called out the Puerto Rican government and their willingness to legalize discrimination against LGBTQ+ people.

“While the world calls for equality, respect for diversity and the defense of human rights, members of the Senate and the House of Representatives and the Governor of Puerto Rico are pushing for a measure that goes against all of the above and it encourages division, prejudice, hatred and the lack of respect for individuality,” Martin wrote on his fan website. “It does so under a premise that undermines the constitutional protections against discrimination on the basis of race, sex or belief, and in its place, justifies an irrational protection of the religious convictions of government employees.”

“As a member of the LGBTT community, I join the constituency that affirms that there has never been a willingness among our LGBTT people to allow for the validation or legalization of discrimination against us.”

“House Bill 2069, filed at the request of Governor Ricardo Rosselló and promoted by Representative Charbonier, achieve nothing more than opening the doors to hatred towards anyone who doesn’t share the same ideology, who simply belong to the LGBTT community, or who don’t  have the same color skin, amidst many other discriminatory measures.”

“Authentic religious freedom calls for respecting everyone equally.”

Bad Bunny also used his platform to stand up for the LGBTQ+ community in Puerto Rico.

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

“While we ‘bad guys’ do out to unite people and try to send a message of respect and tolerance, the leaders of my country work to do the opposite,” he wrote on Instagram. “We cannot take steps backwards, NEVER! @ricardorossello you make excellent coffee, I know that you can also make an excellent decision.”

Calle 13’s Residente joined his Puerto Rican peers to call out the Puerto Rican government’s wishes to strip LGBTQ+ people of their humanity with the law.

These calls against the action came during Pride month when the U.S. is supposed to be celebrating and uplifting the LGBTQ+ community, which still faces discrimination and violence.

After the outcry, Gov. Rosselló reversed his support for the bill and ordered the Puerto Rican House of Representatives to shelf the bill.

Credit: @ricky_martin / Twitter

“WE WON! The recent years, Western countries have made significant advances in guaranteeing equal right for the LGBTT community,” Martin tweeted.

Martin celebrated the decision by educating his followers about what the measure would mean for the LGBTQ+ community.

Credit: @ricky_martin / Twitter

“These advances were threatened recently in Puerto Rico, where the House fo Representatives passed legislation that endangered the progress won in the last decade and risked feeding the division, prejudice, and tensions between the communities.”

He did not sugar coat the true meaning behind the legislation.

Credit: @ricky_martin / Twitter

“By granting government employees the power to act in accordance with their religious convictions, personal values, and principles, this regressive legislation would have sanctioned the practice of institutional discrimination on the part of those who committed themselves to a life in public service.”

Congratulations, Ricky!

Credit: ricky_martin / Instagram

It just goes to show that enough public outcry can make politicians listen to the majority instead of the vocal minority.

READ: After Delay Caused By Border Wall And Trump’s Feud with Puerto Rico, Congress Finally Passes $19.1 Billion Disaster Aid Package

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