Fierce

She Started Her Own Mexican-Inspired Makeup Line But Regrets She Didn’t Quit Her Day Job Sooner

Regina Merson put herself through law school and had a stable job as a bankruptcy attorney in Dallas, Texas. Yet, during her time as an attorney, Merson felt unfulfilled and decided to look elsewhere for her career satisfaction. Merson then decided that she wanted something more creative and cultural so she started her own makeup line called Reina Rebelde. Merson talked to mitú and told us about her decision to abruptly change course and start a very different career.

Regina Merson is an immigrant, Latina entrepreneur who risked a lot to chase a dream.


Merson was a bankruptcy attorney for 6 years in Dallas, Texas but she was never really fulfilled in her career. After a lot of thought, and a round of lay-offs at her law firm, Merson decided to chase her dream of creating a culturally relevant and distinguishable makeup line.

While her law career was something she wanted, she was never fulfilled creatively and she realized it was something that mattered to her.


“After years of soul searching, I realized that what I really wanted was something that was intellectually challenging and creative, and it was that creative piece that was not being fulfilled by my legal career,” Merson told mitú. “Makeup had always been a constant theme in my life. It was something I always felt a personal passion for, and I realized that my love of makeup would be the catalyst to help feed my creative side. Yet, making sure I connected with my roots and did something to participate and contribute positively to my community of fellow Latinas and my native country of Mexico was very important to me.”

Merson was also determined to showcase her Mexican heritage in all aspects of her product.

? Because even Reinas Rebeldes need a little suerte of the Irish with the 4 Play Wet Dry Eye Color in Salvaje ?

A post shared by REINA REBELDE® (@reinarebelde) on


“Every aspect of Reina Rebelde is designed and inspired by my Mexican heritage as well as the essence of this unique Latina woman and the many dualities we have in our lives,” Merson explained to mitú. “From the packaging, which features butterflies and skulls —Mexican symbols for the spiritual transformation that we undergo in our lifecycle, to the interior of the box with the vibrant red and pink Mexican roses that speak to our inherent love of life, color, and our own cultural and personal vibrancy. To our “chica,” who was designed by a talented tattoo artist in East Los Angeles, and she is meant to be a pictorial representation of our customer.”

“We want our Reinas Rebeldes to see a reflection of themselves physically as well as spiritually in our Chica,” Merson told mitú.


Merson says that she worked diligently to make sure that her culture permeates all aspects of her brand from the packaging to the colors to the images and even the names. You can find colors named “Oaxaca,” “La Doña,” and “Brava.”

Now that Merson has made the change in career, she does wish she would have jumped sooner.

Valentine's Day a la Reina Rebelde ?????? Remember mujeres ➙ mejor sola que mal acompañada❗️

A post shared by REINA REBELDE® (@reinarebelde) on


Merson told mitú that she got conflicted advice for different people who thought it was either too out there or that she should just jump right into it. As an immigrant, she was hesitant to push her luck and leave a comfortable job for an overly-saturated market she knew very little about.

“At some point in the process, I realized that Reina Rebelde was not just a business idea (I had many of those), it was something that went much deeper for me,” Merson explained to mitú. “The concept made me feel so alive and passionate, and the more I worked on it, the more it took over my life in the form of constant ah-ha moments. It literally haunted me for a couple of years in the form of daydreams and night dreams. It was always at the forefront of my mind and present in everything I did.  And yet I didn’t take the plunge sooner. What I learned that was most valuable was to listen to my intuition — that is exactly what was operating in full force telling me to make this big life move.”

Her advice to other Latina entrepreneurs looking to break out: find your own path.


Merson admits that she tried things her own way and ignored some advice that led to some painful lessons but she also said that some of the advice that she did follow didn’t work out. The best advice she has for other Latinas blazing their own career paths is to do what makes sense to you and don’t fell like you need to follow someone else’s examples to achieve the success you want.

But, above all else, Merson understands that the more important thing to do is to feel passionate and excited about whatever you are choosing to do.


“I feel so privileged and proud to be Mexican, and to be rooted in this amazing heritage and culture. My love affair with my culture and my homeland continues to get richer and more profound with time and experience,” Merson told mitú. “I credit this pride with giving me the passion to get this business going — which is just to say, whether it is your relationship with your culture or something else, make sure you feel tremendous passion for whatever you do — it’s an energy that mobilizes and sustains you in ways that nothing else can!”


READ: This Is How This Mexican Mom From Oaxaca Is Running Successful Mole And Michelada Businesses

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Community Rallies Around Latina Leader Who Needed A Double Lung Transplant Because Of Covid

Fierce

Community Rallies Around Latina Leader Who Needed A Double Lung Transplant Because Of Covid

GoFundMe

There is still so much that we do not know about Covid-19. One of the biggest mysteries is the long term effect of the virus after people recover. One of the most common things caused by Covid is the need for lung transplants. A Latina leader in Milwaukee experienced just that.

Carmen Lerma is a beloved member of the Latino community of Milwaukee.

Lerma was diagnosed with Covid-19 in July. At the time, cases were growing across the country and we knew even less about the virus than we know now. Lerma’s Covid diagnosis led to the beloved community member needing a double lung transplant because of the viciousness of this virus.

“She is very kind. She is very loved,” fellow volunteer and friend Carmen Hernandez said of Lerma to NBC News. “I feel so bad for her situation right now. She can’t even breathe. It’s really hard for me to see her going through this when she’s such an active person.”

Months after her diagnosis, Lerma has a new pair of lungs.

Credit: Carmen Lerma / Facebook

The Covid-19 pandemic is entering a new and terrifying chapter as cases are growing around the world. Countries in Europe are implementing new restrictions to control the spread of Covid and certain states are follow suit to protect residents. Lerma is hoping that her story can help to convince people of the severity of the virus.

Lerma’s story highlights the seriousness of Covid-19 complications after surviving a diagnosis.

Lung transplants for Covid-19 patients are becoming more and more common as more people are infected with the virus. Currently, more than 8 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with Covid. More than 220,000 people have died and cases, which never significantly decreased, are on the rise again in most states.

Lerma is using her story to get people to care about Covid-19.

Credit: Carmen Lerma / Facebook

There has been a lot of misinformation spread about Covid that has contributed to the spikes. President Donald Trump used his own diagnosis to tell people not to worry about the virus and to get out there and live life, something health experts around the world rebuked. Even Harvard University released a study debunking the claim that certain blood types are more resistant or prone to Covid-19.

In one of the most American traditions, friends set up a GoFundMe to help cover the costs of Lerma’s medical care.

The GoFundMe page has raised more than $30,000 of the $100,000 they are hoping to raise to pay for Lerma’s medical costs. She spent months in hospitals fighting the virus that is currently devastating Wisconsin as it spreads unimpeded. Wisconsin is facing one of the worst outbreaks in the U.S. right now after a conservative judge declared Gov. Tony Evers’ restrictions to slow the spread. The state’s Republican Party is suing to reverse the mask mandate, the single strongest tool we have to battle the virus and save lives.

READ: Joe Biden Walks Away With Final Presidential Debate On Healthcare, Covid, And Many Issues

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Showtime’s ‘Bad Hombres’ Is A Documentary Highlighting The World’s Only Binational Baseball Team

Entertainment

Showtime’s ‘Bad Hombres’ Is A Documentary Highlighting The World’s Only Binational Baseball Team

tecolotes_2_laredos / Instagram

Sports have a way of bringing people together. The experience of rooting for your team is a unifying feeling that transcends borders and culture. Showtime is exploring the importance of sports through the lens of the Tecolotes de los Dos Laredos.

“Bad Hombres” is a documentary highlighting immigration under President Trump through baseball.

Tecolotes de los Dos Laredos are the only binational professional baseball team in the world. The team splits their home games between stadiums in Laredo, Texas and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. Director Andrew Glazer wanted to highlight the immigration issue through a sports lens to offer a different layer to the narrative.

“Most of the people trying to come into the U.S. are families and children trying to escape horrible violence in Central America,” Glazer told CBS Local’s DJ Sixsmith. “That story has been told, so what I wanted to do was show people in a way that I thought would be relatable to what life is like on the border. What life is like on those two sides and how interconnected they are. The thing that struck me to be honest is that initially in Laredo, Texas was how pervasive Spanish is spoken.”

The documentary shows the struggles of the baseball team trying to make sense of the volatile U.S.-Mexico border relations.

The Tecolotes de los Dos Laredos split time playing their home games between two stadiums in the U.S. and Mexico. The Trump administration’s constant battle with Mexico and threats to close the border put the team’s season in jeopardy. A first look teaser shows team managers trying to coordinate the release of game tickets in time with the ever-changing immigration announcements from the Trump administration.

“Bad Hombres” speaks politics without directly addressing politics.

“Even though my film has an overarching political message, the players are not covertly or overtly political in any way,” Glazer told CBS Local’s DJ Sixsmith. “They are baseball players and they are living their lives and a lot of them are trying to make it to the majors and some of them were in the majors and are now finishing their careers. There wasn’t a whole lot of political discussions.”

Glazer made sure to highlight the depths and complexities of the team members dealing with the political climate without politics.

“Inherently, what made the team fascinating is you had players from the U.S. who were Anglo-American players and Mexican American players who had a different perspective,” Glazer told DJ Sixsmith. “Then you had Mexican players and some Dominican players and Cuban and people from everywhere else. There were different languages and different perspectives. Seeing how that developed over time was pretty fascinating.”

“Bad Hombres” is streaming on Showtime.

READ: Veronica Alvarez Is The Coach For The Oakland A’s And Her Presence Is Giving Girls A Chance To Pursue Baseball

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