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People Share The Stories Of Their Past New Years Kisses

If you’ve ever celebrated New Years Eve in the US, you know what it entails: lots of fireworks, too many bottles of champagne, the ball dropping in Times Square, and that quintessential midnight kiss. People often make a big deal about having someone to smooch when the clock strikes twelve—there is many a movie plotline that revolves around this very topic (if you haven’t seen When Harry Met Sally, it’s a classic that you should watch immediately). Some folks are lucky enough to start the night out knowing exactly who will give them that special beso—others, not so much. Either way, the internet is buzzing with stories about their people’s past New Years kisses, and while some anecdotes are total rom-com material, others are awkward, uncomfortable, hopeful or optimistic.

Take this story about someone kissing their girlfriend’s sister at a New Year’s Eve party. They claim it was an accident, but others disagree. We’ll let you be the judge.

Credit: HuffPost

“Accidentally kissed my girlfriend’s sister at a new years party. No one believed it was an accident. It was dark, I was intoxicated. My evening did not end as pleasantly as it might have otherwise.” –Reddit user, Germanakzent

Or this story from a girl who had a competition with a friend to see how many strangers they could kiss one New Years Eve.

Credit: Youtube / Casey Donahue

“I was lucky enough to spend NYE in Berlin, Germany. I made a bet with my friend early in the night that we’d both make out with strangers. I hadn’t kissed anyone since I broke up with my ex 4 months [before]. In the end, I won. I had my first kiss with a guy I’d been eye fucking all night, at midnight. Then enjoyed it so much I figured I’d keep finding hot strangers to kiss. Ended the night with 5 make outs and had the time of my life. Best new years eve ever.” –Reddit user, bendite02

Or this story about a classic high school love triangle.

Credit: Pinterest

“I was deeply in love with my best friend when I was a teenager . . . On New Years Eve, just as the count down started he turned to me and said ‘If something’s done, can it be forgotten?’ I just looked at him confused and he leaned in with a great kiss. We never spoke of it again probably because he was dating my other best friend at the time.” –Reddit user, Mspizzu

Or this person’s animalistic reaction when they were approached by someone for a smooch.

Credit: Getty Images

“I licked a dudes cheek who asked me to give him a midnight kiss. Like how a dog would if there was peanut butter all over his cheek.” –Reddit user, selly112090

Or this sweet Hollywood moment, when an old hometown fling barrels his way through a crowd of people to plant one on his date.

Credit: Everett Collection

“It was a New Years Eve about 5 years ago and I was in my hometown for it. Bumped into a guy I used to see and after a little flirting he said he’s see me at midnight. Come 11:59 the countdown is happening and he’s nowhere in sight. The count gets to 3 and I look around and he is absolutely bombing it through the crowd, pushing people aside to get to me and bang on midnight he rushes into me, grabs me and our lips lock. It’s not the most passionate or meaningful kiss I’ve ever had but damnit it brings a smile to my face every time I think of it.” –Reddit user, howlingatthemoobs

Or this person’s optimistic outlook after being turned down a few days following his New Years kiss (edited for clarity).

Credit: Pinterest

“Had a few drinks waiting for the countdown to midnight, come the strike of twelve, I lean in and whisper in her ear if I could be her New Years kiss. She smiled and said yes, and we kissed. Now, I’ve had a crush on this girl for a long time, and I finally built up the courage to make my move, and I made it.

Afterwards before we had left, I took her aside and told her how I felt, But after I finished confessing my feeling for her, she doesn’t really respond to it. We walk out of the bar and go about the rest of the night.

2 days later, I still haven’t heard from her. But it’s a new year, and that means there’s a whole 365 days I’ll have to meet someone new.” –Reddit user, ChlorineLungs

Whether you find the New Years kiss tradition endearing or overwhelming, make sure you don’t do anything you don’t want to do, and celebrate the New Year in a way that makes you feel comfortable! Happy New Year!

Lizzo Had The Most Inspiring Glow Up Of The Decade And If Her Story Doesn’t Motivate You, I Don’t Know What Will

Entertainment

Lizzo Had The Most Inspiring Glow Up Of The Decade And If Her Story Doesn’t Motivate You, I Don’t Know What Will

lizzobeeating / Instagram

We first started hearing the name Lizzo in 2018, but the singer became a household name in 2019 when she skyrocketed to fame thanks to her incredibly catchy and positive music. Lizzo’s body positivity, self-love and no BS attitude has made her a huge success—but it wasn’t always like that.

It’s not like the singer found “overnight success.” Her huge hits weren’t only one year in the making. 

For a decade, the artist had been working on her music and trying to break out in the entertainment industry. On New Year’s Eve, Lizzo remembered the start of the decade, which was much more difficult than we knew. In 2009, Lizzo was working odd jobs, living out of her car, and had just lost her father. 

The singer took a trip down memory lane posting a major TB picture on Instagram.

Lizzo looked back on the past decade and reflected on some of the troubling times she went through to get to where she is now. “2009 was the year my daddy died. 2009 was the year I lived in my car and cried myself to sleep on Thanksgiving. 2009 I was a girl in Houston, Texas, with no plan, no hope, no will to carry on,” Lizzo began.  Then she reflected on the year that brought her insane success, “2019 is the year my album and song went number 1. 2019 is the year I told my mama, ‘I can buy you a house.’ 2019 I am a woman with a 20/20 vision of the future. Anything can happen in a decade. Tomorrow is the beginning of your anything. Thanks for the ride 2019. Here we go 2020!”

Lizzo had quite an impressive year this 2019

Now the singer’s nominated for eight Grammys, has performed on countless awards show stages, headlined SNL, and was Time magazine’s Entertainer of the Year —just to name a few of her merits. Plus, she’s buying her mom a new house, how’s that for a glow up?

She even worked as a sign spinner before, and now she’s “the artist who defined 2019.”

View this post on Instagram

Don’t stop…. we need you. 2020 is yours for the taking.

A post shared by Lizzo (@lizzobeeating) on

Lizzo is a true inspiration and the best example to follow your dreams, because that’s exactly what she did, and look where it took her. Before Lizzo was the fabulous rapper, flautist, and singer that she is today; she was working odd jobs, like sign-spinning, to make ends meet. “Don’t stop … we need you. 2020 is yours for the taking,” she captioned a post showing her at the beginning of the decade working as a sign spinner for Liberty Taxes and then the promo for her SNL debut. 

Lizzo celebrated New Year’s Eve feeling all of the feels. 

Now that we know just how far she’s come, it’s no surprise that Lizzo was in her feels on New Year’s Eve. The singer has plenty to celebrate, but also a lot to look back on. “NYE MOODS,” she tweeted featuring a few glamorous images. 

Sometimes we forget to acknowledge all the blood, sweat, and tears, artists have shed to get to where they are now.

Other artists identified with Lizzo’s come-up throughout the decade, and shared their own. Adam Rifkin, a writer and director, replied to the rapper’s tweet: “Sometimes it takes 10 years to get that one year that will change your life.” 

Then he shared a full-moment post from Lin-Manuel Miranda.

@ifindkarma

The composer, lyricist, singer, actor, producer, and playwright, worked on his successful Broadway musical Hamilton for years before it found its place.

Lizzo’s having the best time of her life, period.

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U ready?

A post shared by Lizzo (@lizzobeeating) on

“U ready?” she asked her 7.2 million followers, after ringing in the New Year living her absolute best life —And honestly, I don’t think we are. This past year, Lizzo already served us so much great music and self-love, and we’re ready to bet there’s so much more to come. 

Día De Los Reyes Was The First Time I Allowed My S.O. To Experience My Culture

Culture

Día De Los Reyes Was The First Time I Allowed My S.O. To Experience My Culture

bolilloscafe /Instagram

For many who regularly take part in the holiday season, Christmas traditions are strongly tied to religious beliefs and practices. The ways in which the customs around the holiday season are carried out often deeply rooted in cultural rituals and they often vary from family to family. For my Puerto Rican family, the holiday season is drawn out well past the first of January when radio stations reel back on the jingles and Mariah Carey classics. For us, the Twelve Days Of Christmas sales or songs we know of don’t relate to the days leading up to December 25, but rather the twelve days in between Christmas Day and January 6 The Epiphany, a biblical day that marks the final leg of the  Three Wise Men’s journey to deliver gold, frankincense and myrrh to Jesus Christ.

Día De Los Reyes has always been an especially important day for my family. The fact that “reyes” is my mother’s maiden name has only made the day a little sweeter.

Photo provided by Wandy Felicita Ortiz

A more popular holiday back on the island, my abuela and abuelo Reyes brought their traditions to the mainland with them in the 1950s.

On the evening of January 5, each member of my family from grandfather to my youngest sobrino pull out cardboard shoe and clothing boxes (all marked with our names, drawn on and decorated over the years with crayons, markers, and glitter pens) to take part in a tradition that we hold dear in our hearts. After we’ve filled the boxes with snacks like carrots, lettuce, and sometimes grass for the Three Kings’ camels to munch on as they pass through our town we stick the boxes under our beds. Finally, just as we would with Santa Claus, we write the Three Kings–Los Reyes–a handwritten note wishing them safe travels as the journey to see the baby Jesus hoping that as they did with him on that first Epiphany, they’ll leave a small gift or token of some sort under our boxes.

Dia De Los Reyes functions similarly to Christmas Eve in my family. We all wake up and check under our boxes to see if we were good enough this year to receive any gifts. We’d go to mass together, where as kids we’d hope that maybe Los Reyes stayed in town with their camels long enough that day to be at the church community center to pose for photos. We would visit family and eat pernil and arroz con gandules, dishes reserved for celebrations and holidays.

As I got older I went to mass only sometimes and stopped looking to get my photos with Los Reyes.

Photo provided by Wandy Felicita Ortiz

I never stopped checking my box for gifts though, or remembering each rey by the names older relatives taught me to write in my letters: Balthasar, Melchior, and Gaspar. As an adult I focused on new ways to celebrate “being a king,” as my family would say, and took on the role of expert coquito maker.

When I started dating and began wanting to bring boyfriends home for the holidays, part of my new role during the holiday season also unintentionally became one of both gatekeeper and teacher of my Puerto Rican culture. As a sophomore in college, I brought my then boyfriend home for December for the first time. In my household, Noche Buena, Christmas Day, New Years Day, New Year’s Eve, and Dia De Los Reyes were all days set aside for family, exclusively. I knew not to ask for exceptions, and in the past had willfully or grudgingly passed up holiday and New Years parties to honor the expectation of being en familia.

But in my twenties I badly started to yearn for my first New Years kiss and wanted, even more, to share part of my twelve days of Christmas with somebody who mattered to me.

My parents, on the other hand, were hesitant. Dia De Los Reyes was about Los Reyes, as in my family.

My boyfriend was someone they saw a few times a year and knew of only from phone calls, letters, texts, and video chats. Someone so unfamiliar certainly wasn’t considered family, and moreover someone who wasn’t Latino couldn’t possibly understand the sanctity of the day we’d honored so lovingly all our lives.

Most concerning of all, Dia De Los Reyes is also known among some circles as “the poor man’s Christmas,” my grandparents’ explanation being that back in the days of Jesus, being a king didn’t mean wealth like it means today. It meant that the giftschildren and observers receive in their boxes today are small, like a $10 gift card, socks, some mittens, or maybe candy. The last thing my family needed was for some guy they didn’t know to reach into an old shoebox of all things, pull out socks, and think we were cheap. With some convincing and a little grumbling, my family allowed me to write my boyfriend’s name on a box, fill it with lettuce and put it under my bed on January 5.

That night as I lay in bed, I did feel nervous knowing that I was bringing somebody into such a special part of my life that no one had ever seen before outside of my parents. Earlier in the day, I made sure to explain to him how seriously my family took our family only traditions, and how it wasn’t just about the religious holiday but the namesake that ties us to one another. I felt silly as I highlighted decorating beat-up boxes as one of my favorite traditions, something I hadn’t ever admitted out loud. Quiet and reserved, he listened to my stories but didn’t ask any questions.

In the morning, I still had my family only morning mass and our opening of gifts, but later that day my boyfriend was invited over for pasteles, coquito, and the checking of his first and only Three Kings Day box.

My parents observed with critical eyes as he went through the motions of our traditions, seeming charmed by the gifts of a hat and gloves left resting on top of torn up shreds of lettuce, proof that Los Reyes had come through our house. As he followed our lead I sat hoping that by participating in the events himself, he might better understand where my love for my culture comes from, or maybe even briefly feel the same sense of childhood joy I do on that day each year. Admittedly, it was an awkward day for everyone involved and not filled with all the magic I had hoped for. Nonetheless, I still felt proud of myself for being able to break down a barrier that had long existed between myself and not only romantic connections but a friend, too.

I wanted the opportunity to show those outside of my family the part of my identity that I hadn’t always made transparent in my daily life, even if that meant that they didn’t understand or wouldn’t “get it” at first.

Photo provided by Wandy Felicita Ortiz

Even though the person who got to take the test run of my family only traditions and I aren’t together anymore, a few years ago he broke the mold for being able to bring others into a part of my life I was using to shutting so many close to me out of.n Maybe he did think that of us, our gifts, or the day we celebrate as cheap, but after the fact I, didn’t care. In the years that have followed, what has mattered most to me has been that I could start sharing Reyes, this name that laid down the foundation to who I am before I was ever born, and all the nuances that come with it with those I want to know me better.

This Dia De Los Reyes will be one of a few Reyes family festivities that my current boyfriend will be participating in, and another year where my family pulls out his box and welcomes his extra cheer into our holidays. While he’s still learning about my roots, I’m still learning that I can take these moments and use them to bring myself closer to my culture and my loved ones.


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