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In Mexico, People Are Celebrating The Chicana Who Just Landed The Role Of A Nissan Exec

Mayra González is making serious boss moves.

The mexicana, who was the first woman to lead a country subsidiary of Nissan when she acted as president of the Japanese auto maker’s Mexico branch, is now headed to the Asian country, where she will take on the new position as General Director of Nissan Global Sales.

“We thank Mayra for her three years as head of the team in Mexico and we will be attentive to her contribution in her new role with the global sales organization, ” said José Valls, president of Nissan North America, according to Mexican site sopitas.com.

If you’ve followed González’s career, you wouldn’t be surprised by her latest triumph.

The 40-year-old jefa started at the company as a salesperson at an automotive dealership, later working in sales at Nissan in 2001. Eleven years later, she worked her way up to become the first woman on the company’s operations committee in 2012. In 2016, she then became the first female president of a country subsidiary.

González always knew her power, too. According to a tweet by Forbes Mexico, she asked a photographer to take a photo of her in the president’s office years before she took on the role, saying it would one day be her workspace. The photographer giggled, but she never doubted her own determination, brilliance and work ethic would really get her there.

Mexico News Daily reports that the businesswoman successfully led the company through trying times while sitting at its helm over the last three years.

“I think that when I started leading the company, I was driving a ship through calm waters,” she told El Universal, according to the news site. “But then we went into a stormy ocean, and there were a lot of complications. And more than what I brought, I think that what I focused on was creating the right team to pilot that ship as best as possible, and that’s what we’ve done.”

In Mexico, people, especially women, are celebrating González’s latest, but not-so-surprising, accomplishment.

Congratulations, Mayra!

Read: #BossLatinas: Meet Some Of The Richest Latinas In The World

Latina Beauty Brands Crushing The Makeup Game

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Latina Beauty Brands Crushing The Makeup Game

besamecosmetics / Instagram

It’s likely that behind every bold lip you’ve ever rocked, there’s a strong Latina beauty who taught you how to do it. Hence, whether it’s been how to pick the right shade or moisturize with Vicks, there’s no doubt by now you’ve got a handle on rocking a mean pout.

With so much advice passed on from the abuelas and tías in our lives, it’s no wonder more and more Latinas and Latinos are leading the charge in the beauty industry. Check out our fave Latina beauty brands below!

1. Bésame Cosmetics 

This is totally your abuelita’s make up brand. (And why not? She taught you all you know about a good red lip anyways.) Bésame’s founder, Gabriela Hernandez, immigrated from Venezuela and became fascinated with the sophistication of beauty while playing with her abuela’s makeup brushes. Each of Hernandez’s long lasting beauty products act as shoutouts to the romance of 1930’s Hollywood. Her Black Cake Mascara will give you major romance vibes.

2. BeautyBlender

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Blend like a boss!

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If Rea Ann Silva’s beauty must-have hasn’t already swept across the foundation on your face, stop what you’re doing and get on board. Seriously, we’ll wait because it’s awesome.

Got it? Cool! Because the Mexican and Portuguese entrepreneur completely uprooted the makeup game back in 2007. The innovative makeup sponge doesn’t hold onto product and evenly distributes formulas into skin with zero lines. Yes and yes.

3. Nuance by Salma Hayek

Don’t believe that just because she’s on the red carpet that your girl Salma hasn’t a clue about drugstore makeup. The Mexican-born actress strongly believes in bringing products with healthy ingredients to all women. Which means yes you can find the line in the isles of CVS. Her Flawless Finish Liquid Foundation is also a complete steal at $14 a pop.

4. Reina Rebelde

Regina Merson’s colorful range of lipsticks, shadows, and blush palettes act as an ode to the zesftful culture of her Mexican heritage. With shades like ROSA SALVAJE and MORETÓN, Merson’s line is equal parts queen and rebel.

5. Gaby Espino

Venezuelan telenovela star Gaby Espino’s beauty line is proof that she has more talent to bring to the table. Her lipstick and nail polish line stem from her love of beauty products and fans are OBSESSED. The extreme-pigment and long-lasting cream-texture of her Buh Bye Baby lipstick is packed with antioxidants and also mint for calm, smooth lips.

6. Breakups to Makeup

You know that saying “some things are better left unsaid”? Puerto Rican and Cuban makeup artist Angelique Velez’s makeup bag line is for anyone who still has some words to say. Velez’s line of makeup bags and clutches are tagged with quotes that evoke major “same” vibes.

Fun Fact: Velez founded Breakups to Makeups after makeup helped her through a bad break up. #makeupsaveslives

7. Melt Cosmetics

This massive cosmetics brand racked up an equally massive fan base in just a matter of 3 years. Lora Arellano is the other founding half of the popping cosmetics line and has been on our radar as a girl boss for a while. Since the launch of her beauty brand, the first-generation Mexican-American has worked with Rihanna and Serena Williams as their go-to makeup artist.

8. Tata Harper

Tata Harper’s 100% nontoxic skincare line has swept up a massive celebrity clientele that includes Gwenyth Paltrow and also Lake Bell. According to Forbes, Harper is Columbian-born with a background in industrial engineering. Gotta love a woman in STEM!

Pro Tip: Go for the super popular Honey Blossom Mask ($65) for girls night in.

Brujas On Instagram Are Filling Your Feed With Spiritual Guidance And A Place To Relax

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Brujas On Instagram Are Filling Your Feed With Spiritual Guidance And A Place To Relax

brujaenaccion / Instagram

This story was updated on April 14, 2020.

Most Latinas were raised to quiver at just the mention of the word brujería. Many of us were taught that it was evil, a wild, crazy and ungodly practice that ensured our entry into the fiery gates of hell. But as the modern Latina embraces intersectional feminism, and its ideas of self-love and decolonization, many have found a heroine in the bruja foremother whose traditions were demonized because they could not be controlled.

Finding power and strength in natural healing, spiritual wellness and ancestral knowledge, a growing number of Latinas are reclaiming brujería and creating spaces online for education, health-giving and straight magia. Culture makers like Princess Nokia and Nitty Scott incorporate it into their music, platforms like La Brujas Club and Bruja Tip support those on their spiritual journeys and shops like Curandera Press and Brooklyn Brujeria sell goodies for the proud bruja.

Whether you’re just curious or are actively seeking mystical empowerment, here are some brujas who can teach you more about magia.

1. Tatianna Tarot

Tatianna Morales, more popularly known as Tatianna Tarot, is an intuitive tarot specialist, medium and ritual practitioner who uses her Instagram feed to share readings, inspiring messages and fun witchy memes. The New Orleans-based puertorriqueña’s approach to divination is highly accessible, and she has curated a profile that is as impassioned and encouraging as it is vibrant and beautiful.

Join her Virtual Spiritist Prayer Circle on Friday, April 17th from 9:30pm ct / 10:30pm

The virtual gathering helps participants elevate their ancestor and spirit communication. Expect prayers and messages and a ton of beautiful vibes.

2. La Loba Loca

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Feliz dia de las brujas! To all the femme + womxn that stay loving the earth, soil, water, air, non-human-beings, their communities and themselves fiercely. I am a flower bush in between elder and bladderpod flowers 🌺 thankful for all the resilient and rebellious spirits of muxer and femme brujas ancestors burned on the stake, killed by the heteropatriarchy, silenced by the church… we can never burn because we are 🔥! I got a 15% off my online store lalobaloca.bigcartel.com code:bruja + today is the last day to register for RADICALLY AND CONSCIOUSLY MENSTRUATING ONLINE COURSE (link in bio) + if you want extra perks and support this flower elf become my $$ supporter at Patreon.com/lalobaloca 👽 If you party today, don't forget to soltar un aullido or pour some water to the earth for all the so-called brujas, the hxstorians, the gardeners, the seed keepers, the midwives, the gaslighted bitches, the survivors that speak up and are not believed, the survivors that do magic w/o disclosing their experiences, the medicine makers, the mothers being nurse and doctor, the soil workers, the curanderas, the disposed, the care takers… all our ancestors whose magic organized religion, cisheteropatriarchy, white supremacy and capitalism tried to destroy and didn't. I sent this photo to my mom, tias, primas y abuelas today because it has been all their femme magic and labor that got me here. It has always been femme labor and brujeria feminista that makes this world go around. ALWAYS. #medicinafeminista #brujeríafeminista

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La Loba Loca is a queer yerbetera, seed-saver and doula. The Los Angeles-based perunx often shares tips on herbalism, plant relations, social justice, healing justice and autonomous health. Loba also provides positive messages on their Insta, home remedies and promotions for classes, consultations and items like moon pads and bruja feminist gear.

Eclass on April 18 for tending to your garden.

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Check my new e-class and sign up LINK IN BIO, the recording will be available and the early bird sliding scale starts at $18! This knowledge share is for those people interested on learning about starting a garden and keeping a garden using simple and accesible tools. I am going to share with you how I started gardening and how I have turned super sad LA city soil into a vibrant community of plants and microorganisms. I call my garden a "chacra", that is how we call the spaces we cultivate and love on back home in Arequipa. I come from a long line of soil workers, Abuelita seed savers and tias that love on their gardens like each plant was their wawita/baby. I have fallen in love with plants and gardens and I want to share that with you! In this knowledge share we will be focusing on: -the garden as a physical and spiritual space… also as a political space! -building soil and ways to do simple composting and repurposing food and waste to feed soil -how to grow directly in soil (even if it is a small space) -how to grow in containers -basics on growing seeds, choOsing what pants to grow and how to keep them alive -focusing on fast growing plants and strategies to grow medicine and food during a pinchi pandemic that feels like the end of the world as we know it but also finding hope in the plants thriving around us! Join us 🌿link in bio🌿 first group to sign up gets in the run for seed packets💕 #abuelitaknowledge #garden #urbangarden #urbangardening #plantconnection #plant #queer #femme #herbalism

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This class is for people interested in learning about starting and maintaining a garden using simple and accessible tools. According to La Loba Loca she started gardening by turning “super sad LA city soil into a vibrant community of plants and microorganisms.”

3. The Hood Witch

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✨"TheHoodwitch.com is a website/store/blog and community that I had been working on for the last 4 years. It started as a play on words, with roots to a deeper meaning: a reference to the very real "hood witches", healers, curanderas, wise women, priestess, and most importantly my grandmothers. In Black and brown communities brujas were and have been the healers. They are the shoulders to cry on, they could give you a recipe to clear up your colds, bring love into your life, or offer protection. They are the beacons of light for their community and that has always inspired me, knowing that this magic is in my blood. Yesterday, I released my very first recorded interview for @wearemitu as the founder and visionary behind my brand, I've always stayed lowkey, because I wanted to be known for providing tools and not my appearance. In fact, most people have come to only know me for my signature stiletto nails & hand tattoos. I felt it was important more than ever now to show that I am a real person a strong Black & Mexican woman and to put a face to what I've created. The Hoodwitch has been such a source of inspiration for many and this experience has allowed me to explore my understandings deeper of metaphysics, folk medicine, and wellness in ways I never thought possible. I have always believed my purpose in this life was to share, uplift, support, and spread love to the world around me. (Read more below)

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True to her motto, The Hood Witch, also known as Bri Luna, offers everyday magic for the modern mystic. The part-Mexican, part-African American serves her nearly 200K followers by blessing them with self-love notes, self-care tips, hilarious bruja memes and a series of items for sale, like crystals, sage, themed tarot decks and books.

Daily reminders of your worth.

The Hoodwitch has no scheduled events for the Coronavirus quarantine from what we can tell BUT she has a whole heck of a lot of daily advice and hype up.

4. Chiquita Brujita

Chiquita Brujita is a Brooklyn-based fortune teller and bruja dancer. The Boricua’s Instagram is a revolutionary, feel-good, spiritual experience, with posts about liberation, dance — particularly the Afro-Puerto Rican bomba — as resistance and love, and her stunning self-made candles.

Get in on her Magic Mondays

Join Chiquita every Monday for the ultimate house party.

5. Indijam

Agnes Ito, known on the ‘gram as Indijam, is a spiritual mentor, alchemist and light worker whose Instagram will brighten your newsfeed with positive affirmations and bruja tips. A self-described “recovering undercover over-lover,” the Peruana-Filipina often posts about self-love and self-pleasure as well as protecting the heart while allowing it to love after heartbreak.

6. Indigemama

Panquetzani, known more commonly on the interwebs as Indigemama, is a holistic womb counselor, wellness coach and full spectrum doula who uses her Instagram account to share posts about ancestral healing and learning to trust one’s self. With her work primarily focused on reproductive health and motherhood, the Los Angeles-based folk healer also uses her account to educate followers on Mesoamerican womb care techniques.

Go loca with her daily affirmations

Indigemama wrote these affirmations while breastfeeding my babies in quarantine. She wrote them while talking her eldest son through a meltdown on week two of no play dates and while playing with her “joyful toddler who has no idea about the global pandemic and both the ugliness + profound cooperation it’s brought out in people.”

READ: Poetry’s Been Called An Outdated Pastime, But These Latinas Are Breathing New Life Into The Art

Let us know the brujas you love to follow in the comments!