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Marvel Is Bringing More LGBTQ Characters To The Universe

When you’ve taken up the task of representing an entire universe, there’s quite a bit of responsibility to depict diversity on your shoulders. While the Disney-owned division of Marvel Studios has recently, ahem and also very slowly, ramped up its efforts to portray the diversities that exist in our immediate world through projects and characters like “Black Panther”  their spotlight has all but completely passed over LGBTQ+ heroes and heroines. Sure, sure, the studio has trifled with and indulged our imaginations hinting at a few flirty exchanges and off-screen relationships (no, but really you think they’re just chilling at Themyscira? Nothing else? Come now.) but the representation of LTBQ characters in the Marvel Cinematic Universe has been pretty less than super. It’s why this latest bit of news straight from the studio’s president has fans reeling.

According to a recent interview with Marvel Studios head Kevin Feige, the franchise’s upcoming films are about to get a lot more LGBTQ+ love.

Feige might have confirmed suspicions that Valkyrie was the first out character in MCU last year.

Of course, Tessa Thompson who portrayed the difficult to injure character already asserted that Valkyrie was bisexual last year after she made her MCU debut. Feige, on the other hand, seemed to be pretty tight-lipped about new developments in the series but he did confirm that at least two LGBTQ characters will appear in future Marvel films he also said that ‘yes’ we’ve already met one of the characters before.

Now, there’s no guarantee that Valkyrie is the character that Feige was talking about. After all, whether or not she’ll actually even be in the MCU pics to come is still up in the air and LBR it would be pretty awesome if Loki got a chance to soak in the rainbow light too. Still, fans are keeping their fingers crossed that Marvel will give us LGBTQ women of color, a true rarity in both superhero and non-sci-fi fantasy worlds if we’re being real.

Whichever LGBTQ+ character MCU chooses to celebrate, fans who’ve added over 6.6 billion U.S. dollars in the franchise deserve this.

Here’s hoping Feige stays true to his words and ensures that we get characters that add diversity and depth to the series rather than just tokenism. Also, just two out LGBTQ characters is not enough. So here’s hoping Marvel works their power and brings more representation all around.


Read: How These Queer Latinxs Use Their Wardrobes To Disrupt Social Norms

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Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson Says People Always Assumed He Was a Girl Growing Up Because He Had ‘Soft Features’

Entertainment

Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson Says People Always Assumed He Was a Girl Growing Up Because He Had ‘Soft Features’

Dwayne Johnson, agreeably one of the most “masculine” presenting people in the world, recently revealed that people weren’t always so quick to assume he was so. In an interview on “Sunday Today with Willie Geist,” that took place earlier this week the American actor and former professional wrestler revealed that when he was a child, people often assumed he was a girl. 

Speaking about his experience with presumed gender identity, The Rock revealed that people often thought he was girl because of his “soft features.”

“I would say between the ages of 7 and 11, people thought that I was a little girl because I had really soft features and I had really soft Afro hair,” he explained in his interview with Willie Geist.

The actor even went so far as to share a time in his life as a fifth-grader who was riding on a school bus.

“I sit down next to a kid, and within 60 seconds, he goes, ‘Can I ask you something?'” The Rock recalled. “I said, ‘Yeah.’ He goes, ‘Are you a boy or a girl?'”

Drawing on this time in his life, Johnson revealed that likely this also chalks up to his frequent moves as a child.

During his childhood, Johnson’s father Rocky Johnson was a professional wrestler who often moved his family around. According to John, he attended thirteen different schools by the time he was in high school.

“I have had a Forrest Gump-ian childhood growing up,” Johnson explained in his interview. “Wrestling in the ’80s and in the ’70s was way different than it is today. A lot of the times, including my father, the wrestlers would live paycheck to paycheck.”

The former wrestler reflection on earlier days coincides with the recent premiere of the hit NBC sitcom “Young Rock” a new series based on his life.

Fans of Johnson will be glad to know that he also stars in the series.

He is also portrayed by three different actors Adrian Groulx, Bradley Constant and Uli Latukefu.

“Growing up, and you know we specifically went with these timelines in my life that were very defining times at 10 years old, 15 and 18 … there’s a lot of things in between those years that took place … but it was complicated and the relationship that I had with my dad was incredibly complicated — that was fueled by tough love,” he explained during NBC’s TCA press tour in an interview about the series.

He went onto share that his father “was kicked out of his house at 13 and he was homeless, so that then shaped the man who then raised me… And in that complication came an extraordinary life that was full of travel. I lived in 13 different states by the time I was 13 years old, also lived in New Zealand.”

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Chloe Zhao Makes Historical Oscar Win By Becoming First WOC And Second Woman To Win Best Director

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Chloe Zhao Makes Historical Oscar Win By Becoming First WOC And Second Woman To Win Best Director

In its 93 years, the Academy Awards has only ever recognized only seven women in the category of Best Director. This is despite the fact that women have had a long and lasting presence in film history. This year, two women were honored with nominations at the Oscars this year. Emerald Fennell was nominated for her work on “Promising Young Woman” starring Carey Mulligan.

This year, Chloe Zhao, the director of “Nomadland” became the second woman in history to win the best directing award in nearly 100 years.

She is also the first woman of color to win the award.

Zhao won Best Director at the Oscars and became the first woman of color to win the award.

“When I was growing up in China, my dad and I would play this game. We would memorize classic poems and text and try to finish each other’s sentences,” Zhao explained during her acceptance speech.

She went on to recite a line of poetry in Chinese and then translated it in English, “People at birth are inherently good.”

“I have always found goodness in the people I met,” she said. “This is for anyone who has the faith and courage to hold onto the goodness in themselves.”

In addition, Zhao won directing awards from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, and the Directors Guild of America.

Despite the presence of women in the entertainment industry, only seven women have been nominated for awards.

American filmmaker Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win the Academy Award for Best Director for her 2009 film The Hurt Locker. Directors Lina Wertmuller (“Seven Beauties”), Jane Campion (“The Piano”), Sofia Coppola (“Lost in Translation”), and Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”) are the only other female directors to have ever been nominated for the best-directing award.

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