Fierce

There’s A New Kit For Your PreTeen’s First Period That Will Make Talking About It Way Less Taboo

Everyone remembers getting their first period. Whether you were at a friend’s sleepover, riding your bike or sitting in math class, it’s a moment straight out of a teen novel that forever alters your life. A reminder of what your body is capable of, it’s a marker of growing up—and if you haven’t been prepared for what’s involved, it can be a daunting experience.

But, thankfully, today there are so many resources out there to help make that experience easier for the teen getting her first period and for the parents who get to explain all these changes.

The new kit for her first period helps teens embrace their periods.

Getting your first period is a milestone in a woman’s life but thanks to our patriarchal society it’s long been considered a taboo. And, as a result, young girls and women are left suffering to figure it out on their own.

Thankfully, there are new companies out there working to make menstrual education the norm and they’re determined to provide knowledge and supplies to teens who are just starting to menstruate – especially if they’re from underrepresented communities. They’re working to set up the next gen of people who menstruate with better access to products and information so they can feel confident while navigating their bodies’ natural changes.

“We’re dedicated to encouraging families to openly communicate about period and puberty education,” Crystal Etienne, founder of Ruby Love, told POPSUGAR. “We launched our bestselling first-period kits that include educational materials that challenge common misconceptions about puberty and equip teens with the tools they need to embrace their periods.”

Products like these are so important since a woman’s period has major impacts on her life.

A lot of people learn about menstruation and proper period care after having their first period, sometimes even years later. This has a huge impact on access to period care products and education and takes its toll on society as a whole.

For instance, in North America, up to 70 per cent of girls and women have missed school or work because of their period, according to research by UNESCO. Then there’s the very serious issue of health effects. At least one study found that Black women are three times more likely to experience more severe period symptoms than white women, thanks to noncancerous growths in the uterus that can cause heavy periods.

“While the first period talk is an important introduction to puberty, the topic still remains taboo in many families,” Crystal explained to POPSUGAR.

“This can especially be true in minority groups who have traditionally been left out of the conversation due to stigmas surrounding the topic. As a mother, I know how important it is to have a menstrual-care option that is safe, easy to use, and helps celebrate a young girl’s growth. Discussing menstruation as a monumental rite of passage and making her first period experience as positive as possible influences how a young girl views menstruation,” she added.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com