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FAFSA Put A Latina On Notice After She Posted Her Lavish Prom Video That People Read Too Much Into

In late March, 17-year-old high school student Lizbeth Rivas opted to have a video taken of her prom experience, instead of traditional photos. In the prom video, Rivas appears to be living the high life. She dances to the song “Clout” by Offset and Cardi B, models her expensive-looking white prom dress, and flashes a luxury Mercedes-Benz with her crew of friends. To any of her followers, it looked like Rivas was living a life of privilege.

Rivas’s video went viral, prompting comments that mentioned the disparity between her lifestyle and those who can’t afford the same prom experience.

One Tweet in particular took off: Twitter user @_Ferrrg responded to the video with a meme that alluded to FAFSA (the Free Application for Federal Student Aid organization) watching the video and keeping note of Rivas’s extravagant lifestyle.

Although the official FAFSA account was never tagged, FAFSA itself responded through Twitter with a meme of a little boy side-eyeing and sipping a cup of tea. Translated to internet speak?: “We’re watching you“.

Most found the interaction hilarious and it wasn’t long before the response from FASFA went viral.

FASFA’s tweet received over 13K retweets and 48K likes. Though many users found the interaction funny, some expressed concern Rivas would have trouble with financial aid.

According to Rivas she is just an average student struggling to make ends meet like anyone else.

Rivas revealed that the videographer of the high-quality video wasn’t an expensive professional they hired, but a talented friend-of-a-friend. “We wanted to do something different and memorable to us,” Rivas explained to mitú. “I honestly did not think it was going to blow up like how it did on Twitter nor was I looking for attention.”

Rivas went on to state that she paid for her luxurious-looking prom from money she earned at her job at the mall. “People started speculating that my parents paid all this money,” Rivas said. “When in reality, I have a whole job that I was saving up checks since December”.

According to Rivas, people on Twitter have made wrong assumptions about her financial situation.

FAFSA’s response prompted Rivas’s initial Tweet to go even more viral, putting Rivas in fear of receiving the financial aid she sorely needs.

“How [FAFSA] responded made me upset because that just fueled more people and their misconstrued opinions,” Rivas said. According to Rivas, her parents are neither in the financial situation to give her an expensive prom experience nor in the situation to pay out-of-pocket for her college tuition.

Rivas worries now that the viral video and its response could damage her access to financial aid for college, as well as her dreams of going to art school.

Rivas revealed that due to her financial situation, she’s looking at public universities for a college education. “I wanted to go to art school but it’s really expensive so I’m just looking at public universities,” Rivas says.

This ordeal brings up a larger conversation about privilege, the performance of wealth that many participate in (regardless of their financial status) and the crisis younger Americans are currently facing when it comes to paying for higher education.

Hopefully this will be a lesson for everyone not to assume what’s in someone’s bank account based on what they see on that person’s social media–especially when most of what we see on social media rarely represents reality anyway.

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Want To Make Money On OnlyFans? It’s A Lot More Complicated Than You Might Think

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Want To Make Money On OnlyFans? It’s A Lot More Complicated Than You Might Think

Technology has changed the way we do a lot of things, with sex work being one of the industries that’s seen some of the biggest shifts. Where in the past people would have to contact producers, directors, and agents before getting started – with them taking profits and calling the shots as a result – it’s not possible to make sex work for you.

One of the platforms that’s exploded in recent years is OnlyFans, which is allowing content creators to charge a monthly fee that allows customers to see pictures and videos. With OnlyFans comes the added benefit of freedom, with creators choosing what they post and when, giving the platform 20% of profits and keeping the rest. But, it’s often touted as something of a get-rich-quick scheme. But is it?

OnlyFans is different from other platforms but just how much?

In effect, OnlyFans is one of the rare spaces where sex workers have the power. The biggest difference between OnlyFans and other platforms of its kind is that it allows sexually explicit content, and its pay model is similar to camming sites in that it allows for tipping and pay-per-view content on top of the subscription fee.

The model’s brilliance is in its simplicity, and it’s revolutionary in how it prioritizes the agency of creators, offering them the ability to have autonomy over their bodies, their content, and their prices.

The company also offers free legal services to all of the creators, working quickly and swiftly to remove any leaked content (and yes, a lot of the sexually explicit content is leaked to PornHub). Of course, this isn’t a charitable enterprise: OnlyFans takes a 20 percent cut of its creators’ profits, and with 75 million active users, the company has been turning a profit of its own since its inception. 

So how much can you realistically make?

With claims from the company that they’ve paid out $725 million to its 450,000 content creators, and celebrities including Cardi B, Blac Chyna, and Tyler Posey registered to the subscription service – not to mention Bella Thorne, who claims to have made $2 million from it in less than a week – it’s easy to see why it’s an attractive option. Like any form of work, though, you get what you put in, as evidenced by those who use OnlyFans to sell photos.

Subscriptions to an OnlyFans account start from $5 and move their way up to $25 a month. Although there’s no cap on what you make, it does vary a lot between smaller and larger creators, so it’s important to be realistic.

What kind of content should you be uploading to the site?

OnlyFans is primarily for adult content, but there are a number of creators who use it for different reasons. Some food and fitness influencers share premium recipes and workouts to their paying subscribers.

You have absolute choice over what you post but, as mentioned, you’ll likely get requests from subscribers for specific things. Although you might make extra money from these requests, only ever do what you feel comfortable with.

Before you get into things, perhaps write a list of absolute ‘no’ content, and this can act as your benchmark for what you’re happy to do. From there, it’s just about your own creativity and imagination.

Now, how do you get those followers and their coins?

For established adult performers, the fans you have already can be translated onto OnlyFans. However, all of the creators we spoke to said that the main way they found their loyal subscriber base was through interaction and finding a niche.

Honey Gold, an award-winning pornstar who posts content on OnlyFans said: ‘It takes no time at all to find out exactly what your fans want, making it easy to provide them with the best content and keep them on-board as subscribers… ‘It’s really important to interact with your fans too – a lot of your subscribers will be paying for this reason alone. By doing this you can find out exactly what content to put out and build a really dedicated fanbase as you go.’

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Lifestyles Of The Rich And Dangerous: Cartels Are Using TikTok To Lure Young People

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Lifestyles Of The Rich And Dangerous: Cartels Are Using TikTok To Lure Young People

If you’ve ever wondered what someone with a bulletproof vest and an AR-15 would look like flossing — the dance, not the method of dental hygiene — apparently the answer to that question can be found on TikTok.

Unfortunately, it’s not as a part of some absurdist sketch comedy or surreal video art installation. Instead, it’s part of a growing trend of drug cartels in Mexico using TikTok as a marketing tool. Nevermind the fact that Mexico broke grim records last year for the number of homicides and cartel violence, the cartels have found an audience on TikTok and that’s a serious cause for concern.

Mexican cartels are using TikTok to gain power and new recruits.

Just a couple of months ago, a TikTok video showing a legit high-speed chase between police and drug traffickers went viral. Although it looked like a scene from Netflix’s Narcos series, this was a very real chase in the drug cartel wars and it was viewed by more than a million people.

Typing #CartelTikTok in the social media search bar brings up thousands of videos, most of them from people promoting a “cartel culture” – videos with narcocorridos, and presumed members bragging about money, fancy cars and a luxury lifestyle.

Viewers no longer see bodies hanging from bridges, disembodied heads on display, or highly produced videos with messages to their enemies. At least not on TikTok. The platform is being used mainly to promote a lifestyle and to generate a picture of luxury and glamour, to show the ‘benefits’ of joining the criminal activities.

According to security officials, the promotion of these videos is to entice young men who might be interested in joining the cartel with images of endless cash, parties, military-grade weapons and exotic pets like tiger cubs.

Cartels have long used social media to shock and intimidate their enemies.

And using social media to promote themselves has long been an effective strategy. But with Mexico yet again shattering murder records, experts on organized crime say Cartel TikTok is just the latest propaganda campaign designed to mask the blood bath and use the promise of infinite wealth to attract expendable young recruits.

“It’s narco-marketing,” said Alejandra León Olvera, an anthropologist at Spain’s University of Murcia, in a statement to the New York Times. The cartels “use these kinds of platforms for publicity, but of course it’s hedonistic publicity.”

Mexico used to be ground zero for this kind of activity, where researchers created a new discipline out of studying these narco posts. Now, gangs in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, and the United States are also involved.

A search of the #CartelTikTok community and its related accounts shows people are responding. Public comments from users such as “Y’all hiring?” “Yall let gringos join?” “I need an application,” or “can I be a mule? My kids need Christmas presents,” are on some of the videos.

One of the accounts related to this cartel community publicly answered: “Of course, hay trabajo para todos,” “I’ll send the application ASAP.” “How much is the pound in your city?” “Follow me on Instagram to talk.” The post, showing two men with $100 bills and alcohol, had more than a hundred comments.

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