fierce

This Year’s Powerful #WeAllGrow Summit Presents The Most Influential Latina Change-makers In The Game

#WeAllGrow is a Latina-focused event that has, for years, operated on the notion that it takes a village. In a world where Latinas and other WOC aren’t always the first priority, #WeAllGrow does its best to make sure that we are. At the annual summit, lack of representation in the media and other political spaces feels nearly invisible. The event hosts hundreds of women interested in the digital media space, entrepreneurship and above all Latina empowerment and does so by bringing together some of the most influential women in the industry. This year the summit continues its efforts to encourage networking and mentorship.

Here are the fiercest Latinas from the summit to celebrate, follow and learn from on International Women’s Day.

1. Yalitza Aparicio

weallgrowlatina.com

The Mexican actress is best known for her role as Cleo in Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” earned her first Academy Award nomination for Best Actress this year. She is the first Indigenous American woman to ever be nominated.

Follow her on Instagram here.

2. Melissa Barrera

weallgrowlatina.com

Melissa Barrera best known for her role in the STARZ series “Vida” most recently starred in Netflix’s “Club de Cuervos.” According to the We All Grow site, Barrera “began her career starring in popular telenovelas in her native country, Mexico, including “La Mujer de Judas” and “La Otra Cara del Alma” as well as the renowned “Siempre Tuya Acapulco” and “Tanto Amor.” 

Follow her on Instagram here.

3. Mishel Prada

weallgrowlatina.com

Part Dominican, part Mexican, Mishel Prada was raised in Hialeah, Fla. stars as ‘Emma’ in Starz critically acclaimed series “Vida.”  Prior to her work on “Vida,” Prada starred in AMC’s short-form series “Fear the Walking Dead: Passage. Through her acting work, Prada has echoed the strength and determination that she learned from the immigrant women in her family.

Follow her on Instagram here.

4. Julissa Prado

weallgrowlatina.com

Julissa Prado is an entrepreneur and social media influencer who has built a following based on advocacy for natural curls. According to We All Grow, “Julissa holds a Masters in Business from Wake Forest University, is an alumnus of UCLA and has held corporate leadership positions at Nestlé. She is the founder and CEO of Rizos Curls line of haircare products launched Oct 2017 to encourage women & girls to be proud of their naturally curly hair and show them that curly hair is beautiful. Rizos Curls has ignited a movement of #RizosReinas embracing their natural curls. In the year and a half since its launch, Julissa and Rizos Curls have accumulated over 300k followers across social media platforms, been featured on Forbes, People, Buzzed, Mitu, Remezcla, shipped to over 60 countries and have over 2 million on average social media monthly impressions.

Follow her on Instagram here.

5. Mariela Rosario

Mariela Rosario is the Afro-Latina editor-in-chief behind Hip Latina. As a writer, editor, and digital content strategist she has racked up a total of ten years in the Latinx space. She led CafeMedia’s first site for Latina moms and went on to develop Vivala.com. She is currently the Editor in Chief at HipLatina.com and recently created Galchemism, a new platform that empowers and educates women of color in arts & tech. Her writing has been featured in The Huffington Post, Cosmopolitan, and Latina.

Follow her on Instagram here.

6. Yesika Salgado

weallgrow.com

Yesika Salgado is a Los Angeles based Salvadoran poet who has built a devoted following based on her writing about her culture, her family, and her body. She is a four-time member of Da Poetry Lounge Slam Team and a 2017 and 2018 National Poetry Slam finalist. Her work has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Latina Magazine, Univision, Vibe Magazine, Huffington Post, NPR, TEDx and more. Today she is a beloved body positivity activist and the co-founder of the Latina feminist collective Chingona Fire. Yesika is the author of the Amazon best-sellers Corazón and Tesoro, published with Not a Cult.

Follow her here.

8. Jessica Resendiz

weallgrow.com

Resendiz has taken her love for her childhood memories and Mexican culture and applied them to the statement pieces she designs. Her pieces of jewelry are a reminder that the most lovely accessory a person can wear is their ‘culture.’ Her work is a constant reminder to Latinas to do so with pride and vibrancy.

Follow her on Instagram here.

9. Zandra Zuno Baermann

weallgrow.com

Zandra Zuno Baermann is the senior vice president of Communications and Marketing at UnidosUS where she serves as strategic communications advisor to the CEO and senior leadership. Throughout her career, she has collaborated with and advised companies like Kaiser Permanente, Nintendo of America, Walmart, and Wells Fargo.

Follow her on Instagram here.

10. Kimberly Guerra

Guerra is an artist, writer, entrepreneur and the creator behind Brown Badass Bonita. The beloved brand with a nearly 50K following on Instagram promotes love for our Latinx community and empowerment. Her apparel works to celebrate Latino cultures and to empower mujeres.

Follow her work on Instagram here.


Read: We Spotted These Three Latina Owned Accessory Brands At The #WeAllGrow Summit And We Are Totally Here For The Empowerment They Bring

Recommend this story by clicking the share button below! 

Paid Promoted Stories

Texas Official Under Fire For Telling Latina County Judge To "Speak English"

fierce

Texas Official Under Fire For Telling Latina County Judge To “Speak English”

After a massive fire burned for several days at a petrochemical facility in suburban Houston, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo delivered updates to constituents in English and Spanish, prompting criticism from a Republican commissioner in a neighboring county.

“English this is not Mexico,” Mark Tice of Chambers County commented on a video posted on CBS affiliate KHOU’s Facebook page of Judge Lina Hidalgo — the first Latina elected as the county’s top executive — addressing the public and reporters of the blaze in both languages.

The Colombian-born judge responded to English-language media in English and Spanish-language journalists in their tongue in order to reach as many viewers who might be impacted by the combustion as possible.

In Harris County, which includes Houston, more than 4.6 million people — or 43 percent — identify as Hispanic or Latinx. Additionally, more than 40 percent of the population there speaks a language other than English at home.

But Tice, who also called Hidalgo a “joke,” continued with his disparaging remarks, saying: “It’s real simple. This is the United States. Speak English.”

His comments garnered backlash quickly, with fellow Facebook users reminding him of Houston’s vast Spanish-speaking population and that the US does not have an official language.

Hours after his initial comments, Tice issued an apology.

“I apologize to Judge Hidalgo, the citizens of my County, and most importantly the entire Hispanic community for hastily acting out with transgression on social media,” he said. “I recognize how my response could have been interpreted in a derogatory manner and for that I am sorry. I immediately regretted my choice of words. I’m not proud of my behavior, that is not the example I wish to lead by. I can only hope, in time, that my actions can be forgiven.”

Hidalgo’s office also issued a response to Tice, explaining that as county judge, Hidalgo is in charge of her region’s safety and would do anything in her power, including utilizing her bilingual skillset, to prioritize their well-being.

“As the Head of Emergency Management, Hidalgo is directly responsible for the safety of all 4.5 million residents of Harris County, a third of whom are Spanish speakers,” Kiran Khalid, Hidalgo’s director of communications, said. “Judge Hidalgo represents all of Harris County and given the county’s composition and her bilingual skills, she will continue to communicate as broadly as possible especially when public safety is at stake.”

Hidalgo, 28, was one of several Democrats who won elected office in Texas in November.

Read: In Texas, These Latina Girls Produced A Virtual Reality Documentary On Gentrification In East Austin

Recommend this story by clicking the share button below!