Fierce

This Year’s Powerful #WeAllGrow Summit Will Be Available For Streaming

#WeAllGrow is a Latina-focused event that has, for years, operated on the notion that it takes a village. In a world where Latinas and other WOC aren’t always the first priority, #WeAllGrow does its best to make sure that we are. At the annual summit, lack of representation in the media and other political spaces feels nearly invisible. The event hosts hundreds of women interested in the digital media space, entrepreneurship and above all Latina empowerment and does so by bringing together some of the most influential women in the industry. This year the summit continues its efforts to encourage networking and mentorship.

This year we’re partnering up with #WeAllGrow to offer a DIGITAL PASS to the #weallgrowsummit and giving you an EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT today when you use the code EARLYBIRD19 at checkout! The pass will include:

– Full HD videos of all keynotes, panels and workshops.
– Early bird access to the #WeAllGrow2020 Summit (this year’s tickets sold out in 3 hours)!
– $10 discount to mitushop.com
– Digital access to the workshop presentations + worksheets (where available)

Promo code is valid until June 7th, 2019. Get your pass today.

Here are the fiercest Latinas from the summit to celebrate, follow and learn from:

1. Yalitza Aparicio

weallgrowlatina.com

The Mexican actress is best known for her role as Cleo in Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” earned her first Academy Award nomination for Best Actress this year. She is the first Indigenous American woman to ever be nominated.

Follow her on Instagram here.

2. Melissa Barrera

weallgrowlatina.com

Melissa Barrera best known for her role in the STARZ series “Vida” most recently starred in Netflix’s “Club de Cuervos.” According to the We All Grow site, Barrera “began her career starring in popular telenovelas in her native country, Mexico, including “La Mujer de Judas” and “La Otra Cara del Alma” as well as the renowned “Siempre Tuya Acapulco” and “Tanto Amor.” 

Follow her on Instagram here.

3. Mishel Prada

weallgrowlatina.com

Part Dominican, part Mexican, Mishel Prada was raised in Hialeah, Fla. stars as ‘Emma’ in Starz critically acclaimed series “Vida.”  Prior to her work on “Vida,” Prada starred in AMC’s short-form series “Fear the Walking Dead: Passage. Through her acting work, Prada has echoed the strength and determination that she learned from the immigrant women in her family.

Follow her on Instagram here.

4. Julissa Prado

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Julissa Prado is an entrepreneur and social media influencer who has built a following based on advocacy for natural curls. According to We All Grow, “Julissa holds a Masters in Business from Wake Forest University, is an alumnus of UCLA and has held corporate leadership positions at Nestlé. She is the founder and CEO of Rizos Curls line of haircare products launched Oct 2017 to encourage women & girls to be proud of their naturally curly hair and show them that curly hair is beautiful. Rizos Curls has ignited a movement of #RizosReinas embracing their natural curls. In the year and a half since its launch, Julissa and Rizos Curls have accumulated over 300k followers across social media platforms, been featured on Forbes, People, Buzzed, Mitu, Remezcla, shipped to over 60 countries and have over 2 million on average social media monthly impressions.

Follow her on Instagram here.

5. Mariela Rosario

Mariela Rosario is the Afro-Latina editor-in-chief behind Hip Latina. As a writer, editor, and digital content strategist she has racked up a total of ten years in the Latinx space. She led CafeMedia’s first site for Latina moms and went on to develop Vivala.com. She is currently the Editor in Chief at HipLatina.com and recently created Galchemism, a new platform that empowers and educates women of color in arts & tech. Her writing has been featured in The Huffington Post, Cosmopolitan, and Latina.

Follow her on Instagram here.

6. Yesika Salgado

weallgrow.com

Yesika Salgado is a Los Angeles based Salvadoran poet who has built a devoted following based on her writing about her culture, her family, and her body. She is a four-time member of Da Poetry Lounge Slam Team and a 2017 and 2018 National Poetry Slam finalist. Her work has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Latina Magazine, Univision, Vibe Magazine, Huffington Post, NPR, TEDx and more. Today she is a beloved body positivity activist and the co-founder of the Latina feminist collective Chingona Fire. Yesika is the author of the Amazon best-sellers Corazón and Tesoro, published with Not a Cult.

Follow her here.

8. Jessica Resendiz

weallgrow.com

Resendiz has taken her love for her childhood memories and Mexican culture and applied them to the statement pieces she designs. Her pieces of jewelry are a reminder that the most lovely accessory a person can wear is their ‘culture.’ Her work is a constant reminder to Latinas to do so with pride and vibrancy.

Follow her on Instagram here.

9. Zandra Zuno Baermann

weallgrow.com

Zandra Zuno Baermann is the senior vice president of Communications and Marketing at UnidosUS where she serves as strategic communications advisor to the CEO and senior leadership. Throughout her career, she has collaborated with and advised companies like Kaiser Permanente, Nintendo of America, Walmart, and Wells Fargo.

Follow her on Instagram here.

10. Kimberly Guerra

Guerra is an artist, writer, entrepreneur and the creator behind Brown Badass Bonita. The beloved brand with a nearly 50K following on Instagram promotes love for our Latinx community and empowerment. Her apparel works to celebrate Latino cultures and to empower mujeres.

Follow her work on Instagram here.


Read: We Spotted These Three Latina Owned Accessory Brands At The #WeAllGrow Summit And We Are Totally Here For The Empowerment They Bring

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9 LGBTQ+ Latinas Making The World A Better Place Through Representation

Culture

9 LGBTQ+ Latinas Making The World A Better Place Through Representation

Women are a driving force for change. It has been proven time and time again in history. LGBTQ+ Latinas are part of this tradition whether it is in activism, media, or representation in comic books. Here are 9 LGBTQ+ Latinas who are doing their part to make the world a better place.

Stephanie Beatriz

Stephanie Beatriz is known for her character Rosa on “Brooklyn Nine-Nine.” The actress wanted to create a character that someone like her could relate to and she made it happen. Rosa came out in the show as a bisexual Latina and it gave Beatriz a chance to play a character that reflects her real identity. For the first time, bisexual Latinas have someone on television that speaks to a very real and important identity.

Tessa Thompson

Tessa Thompson publicly came out of the closet as bisexual in 2018. The actress revealed her relationship with musician Janelle Monáe and fans were there to support her. Thompson made a real splash in the Marvel Cinematic Universe when she portrayed Valkyrie in “Thor: Ragnarok.” She will be slaying again as Valkrie in “Thor: Love and Thunder.”

Bamby Salcedo

Bamby Salcedo is unapologetically trans and fighting for trans lives and rights. Salcedo founded the TransLatin@ Coalition to create a network for trans Latinas to connect and help each other thrive. Salcedo is often in protests for trans lives including against Pete Buttigieg during a CNN/HRC Town Hall.

Victoria Cruz

Victoria Cruz is a gatekeeper of LGBTQ+ history. The indigenous trans woman was there for the start of the Gay Liberation movement in 1969. Cruz has been a leader in the fight for LGBTQ+ rights. Cruz has continued to her fight for trans rights even in the face of transphobia in the LGBTQ+ community. As the LGBTQ+ community tends for forget its history, Cruz is here to remind them of how important the trans community is in gaing LGBTQ+ rights.

Carmen Carrera

Carmen Carrera first came into everyone’s home as a contestant on “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” This was before she started her transition. Since embarking on her transition journey, Carrera has had a very successful career as a supermodel, became a stepmother, and has been championing trans rights in the U.S. and Peru. The activist has spent years breaking down stereotypes about trans people wherever she goes.

Salice Rose

Salice Rose is a major name in social media. With more than 16 million followers on TikTok, Rose has created a place for people to feel safe and included. Using comedy and her spirituality, Rose has been able to tackle important issues, like coming out.

Gabby Rivera

Gabby Rivera was tapped to write for the America Chavez comic book in a move by Marvel that was widely celebrated. Rivera was able to give American Chavez, a queer Latin superhero, an authentic voice. Rivera is also the author of “Juliet Takes A Breaths.’ The young adult novel follows a Puerto Rican girl who comes out to her family right before going to an internship on the other side of the country.

Martine Gutierrez

Martine Gutierrez is a famed photographer and artist that has displayed work around the world. The art critic Barbara Calderon wrote about Gutierrez’s identity that has been an elusive yet broad identity. Calderon spoke of terms used to identify oneself yet none seemed to accurately describe who Gutierrez is.

Lido Pimienta

Lido Pimienta is an Afro-indigenous Colombian Canadian musician who is transforming Latin music, especially the scene with her sexuality. The queer musician is unapologetic about her identity for the sake of visibility. Pimienta feels a need to stay ver visible to change the long-running history of no queer visibility in media.

READ: Here Are Some Queer Films And Shows To Watch To Start Pride Off Right

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Turns Out The First Owner Of Beverly Hills Was An Impressive Afro-Mexican Woman

Fierce

Turns Out The First Owner Of Beverly Hills Was An Impressive Afro-Mexican Woman

Beverly Hills, one of the most well-known destinations in the country and world has long been a thriving and prime area for real-estate. Long before it was colonized by the Spanish, and was largely populated by rich white elites, the Indigenous people of California known as the Tongva, thrived there.

Hundreds of years later, in the 1830s, when the area was colonized, Maria Rita Valdez Villa, the granddaughter of Spanish colonists Luis and Maria Quintero and the great-granddaughter of an African slave was granted the original 4,500-acre of Beverly Hills, then known as El Rancho Rodeo de las Aguas.

Yes, as it turns out the foremother of Beverly Hills was a Black Latina!

During her ownership, Maria Rita oversaw cattle ranching and farming.

According to LA Magazine, Rita “was well known for holding a yearly celebratory rodeo under a famous eucalyptus tree at what is now Pico and Robertson boulevards.”

Sadly, after working the land for so much time, three Indigenous Californian outlaws attacked the ranch in 1852. The attack led to a shootout amongst “a grove of walnut trees at what is now Benedict Canyon and Chevy Chase drives” and eventually in 1854 Maria Rita decided to sell the area to investors Henry Hancock and Benjamin D. Wilson for $4,000.

Perhaps there’s a chance for justice for Maria Rita in the end.

Recently, Los Angeles County officials revealed that they were contemplating returning a beachfront property that was seized from a Black family nearly a century ago.

According to the Guardian, Manhattan Beach used “eminent domain” in 1924 to force Willa and Charles Bruce, the city’s first Black landowners, of the land where they lived. “The Bruces also ran a resort for Black families during a time when beaches in the strand were segregated,” explained the Guardian in a recent report. “Part of the land was developed into a city park. It is now owned by Los Angeles county and houses lifeguard headquarters and a training center.”

Manhattan Beach county Supervisor Janice Hahn announced that she was looking into ways to restore justice for Bruce family. Options include delivering the land back to the family, paying for losses, or potentially leasing the property from them

“I wanted the county of Los Angeles to be a part of righting this terrible wrong,” Hahn explained in a recent interview with KABC-TV.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com