Fierce

This Year’s Powerful #WeAllGrow Summit Will Be Available For Streaming

#WeAllGrow is a Latina-focused event that has, for years, operated on the notion that it takes a village. In a world where Latinas and other WOC aren’t always the first priority, #WeAllGrow does its best to make sure that we are. At the annual summit, lack of representation in the media and other political spaces feels nearly invisible. The event hosts hundreds of women interested in the digital media space, entrepreneurship and above all Latina empowerment and does so by bringing together some of the most influential women in the industry. This year the summit continues its efforts to encourage networking and mentorship.

This year we’re partnering up with #WeAllGrow to offer a DIGITAL PASS to the #weallgrowsummit and giving you an EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT today when you use the code EARLYBIRD19 at checkout! The pass will include:

– Full HD videos of all keynotes, panels and workshops.
– Early bird access to the #WeAllGrow2020 Summit (this year’s tickets sold out in 3 hours)!
– $10 discount to mitushop.com
– Digital access to the workshop presentations + worksheets (where available)

Promo code is valid until June 7th, 2019. Get your pass today.

Here are the fiercest Latinas from the summit to celebrate, follow and learn from:

1. Yalitza Aparicio

weallgrowlatina.com

The Mexican actress is best known for her role as Cleo in Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” earned her first Academy Award nomination for Best Actress this year. She is the first Indigenous American woman to ever be nominated.

Follow her on Instagram here.

2. Melissa Barrera

weallgrowlatina.com

Melissa Barrera best known for her role in the STARZ series “Vida” most recently starred in Netflix’s “Club de Cuervos.” According to the We All Grow site, Barrera “began her career starring in popular telenovelas in her native country, Mexico, including “La Mujer de Judas” and “La Otra Cara del Alma” as well as the renowned “Siempre Tuya Acapulco” and “Tanto Amor.” 

Follow her on Instagram here.

3. Mishel Prada

weallgrowlatina.com

Part Dominican, part Mexican, Mishel Prada was raised in Hialeah, Fla. stars as ‘Emma’ in Starz critically acclaimed series “Vida.”  Prior to her work on “Vida,” Prada starred in AMC’s short-form series “Fear the Walking Dead: Passage. Through her acting work, Prada has echoed the strength and determination that she learned from the immigrant women in her family.

Follow her on Instagram here.

4. Julissa Prado

weallgrowlatina.com

Julissa Prado is an entrepreneur and social media influencer who has built a following based on advocacy for natural curls. According to We All Grow, “Julissa holds a Masters in Business from Wake Forest University, is an alumnus of UCLA and has held corporate leadership positions at Nestlé. She is the founder and CEO of Rizos Curls line of haircare products launched Oct 2017 to encourage women & girls to be proud of their naturally curly hair and show them that curly hair is beautiful. Rizos Curls has ignited a movement of #RizosReinas embracing their natural curls. In the year and a half since its launch, Julissa and Rizos Curls have accumulated over 300k followers across social media platforms, been featured on Forbes, People, Buzzed, Mitu, Remezcla, shipped to over 60 countries and have over 2 million on average social media monthly impressions.

Follow her on Instagram here.

5. Mariela Rosario

Mariela Rosario is the Afro-Latina editor-in-chief behind Hip Latina. As a writer, editor, and digital content strategist she has racked up a total of ten years in the Latinx space. She led CafeMedia’s first site for Latina moms and went on to develop Vivala.com. She is currently the Editor in Chief at HipLatina.com and recently created Galchemism, a new platform that empowers and educates women of color in arts & tech. Her writing has been featured in The Huffington Post, Cosmopolitan, and Latina.

Follow her on Instagram here.

6. Yesika Salgado

weallgrow.com

Yesika Salgado is a Los Angeles based Salvadoran poet who has built a devoted following based on her writing about her culture, her family, and her body. She is a four-time member of Da Poetry Lounge Slam Team and a 2017 and 2018 National Poetry Slam finalist. Her work has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Latina Magazine, Univision, Vibe Magazine, Huffington Post, NPR, TEDx and more. Today she is a beloved body positivity activist and the co-founder of the Latina feminist collective Chingona Fire. Yesika is the author of the Amazon best-sellers Corazón and Tesoro, published with Not a Cult.

Follow her here.

8. Jessica Resendiz

weallgrow.com

Resendiz has taken her love for her childhood memories and Mexican culture and applied them to the statement pieces she designs. Her pieces of jewelry are a reminder that the most lovely accessory a person can wear is their ‘culture.’ Her work is a constant reminder to Latinas to do so with pride and vibrancy.

Follow her on Instagram here.

9. Zandra Zuno Baermann

weallgrow.com

Zandra Zuno Baermann is the senior vice president of Communications and Marketing at UnidosUS where she serves as strategic communications advisor to the CEO and senior leadership. Throughout her career, she has collaborated with and advised companies like Kaiser Permanente, Nintendo of America, Walmart, and Wells Fargo.

Follow her on Instagram here.

10. Kimberly Guerra

Guerra is an artist, writer, entrepreneur and the creator behind Brown Badass Bonita. The beloved brand with a nearly 50K following on Instagram promotes love for our Latinx community and empowerment. Her apparel works to celebrate Latino cultures and to empower mujeres.

Follow her work on Instagram here.


Read: We Spotted These Three Latina Owned Accessory Brands At The #WeAllGrow Summit And We Are Totally Here For The Empowerment They Bring

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This Latina Came Up With A Genius Hack For All Those Requests For Booty Selfies

Culture

This Latina Came Up With A Genius Hack For All Those Requests For Booty Selfies

Monica Escalante / Facebook

If you’re dealing with an influx of requests for booty pics, Monica Escalante has got a solution for you. This savvy Latina uses the app Wit Puzzles to give her prospective beaus what they want, all the while making them work for it. 

Modern romance, what even is it? What did old people do in the past? Talk in person about their interests? Well, I haven’t got time for that, I am a well-educated, sophisticated woman; I’ve got “Drake is Dominican” memes to collect for my Master’s thesis. My parents met when they were 13 in the 1600s or whenever, I don’t know. All I know is hip hop wasn’t even invented yet. They’re still together. Love isn’t dead it’s just old. As I like to say, out with the old, in with the new. 

Meet this innovative queen.

Monica Escalante is a mere 18 years old and already shifting the paradigm of the modern sext. She and her friends have been using the Wit Puzzles app. The app turns any photo into a sliding puzzle game. You send the game to a friend for them to solve. It sounds fun and innocent, and yet… When a gentlemen caller requested a butt pic, as gentlemen callers do, Escalante decided to turn her derriere into a puzzle. Her mind! 

“My friends and I would just send random pics and see who would solve them the fastest and then an idea hit me and I was like wait, he wants a booty pic I’m gonna make him work for it,” she told BuzzFeed News. “So I just decided to send my booty pic as a puzzle.”

Would you want to date a guy who can’t solve a simple puzzle?

Escalante’s tweet went viral with over 56,000 likes. Most importantly, her man friend was able to solve it. Imagine if he couldn’t? How embarrassing that would be for everyone involved. I shudder to think!

“I am pretty sure he liked it, he solved it super fast, in less than 5 minutes with 34 moves,” she said.

This isn’t a lifestyle it’s a movement.

Whenever anyone has a good idea, it is bound to be imitated by others. The slide puzzle booty shot isn’t a lifestyle, it’s a movement. This is the next frontier of sexting. Don’t just give these dweebs your precious nudes, test them. How can we incorporate the Pythagorean Theorem? Yo, my guy, you have to know how to solve for X if you want to access my catalog of nudes.  

Unfortunately, others tried this technique and, naturally, some men were too “limited” to understand the proposition. 

Men were disarmed by this new collective bargaining chip. Great, that’s the whole point. Some felt this was a technique reserved for the elderly. That just seems like further proof this is a wise choice. 

“Damn I got to solve puzzles to get nudes nowadays. How old are we, 77?” One person responded.  

Another person praised the genius of the booty pic sender, as one should.

I mean this is a legit creative way to answer those damn requests Requests for nudes that guys always be slipping in them DMs and texts.

Thank this humble queen.

Escalante isn’t asking for monuments to be erected in her image as she should. Instead, she is a mere humble goddess who is satisfied with people liking her idea. 

“The reaction from Twitter has been amazing, people love it and I’ve been getting DMs from girls and guys doing it,” said Escalante. “I’m glad they’re having fun with it.”

When I think of making men solve puzzles to earn intimacy, I think of the eternal words from one of history’s greatest masters of the English language. “We found love in a hopeless place” — Rihanna. Yes, but we still found it. 

The San Antonio Four Were A Set Of Wrongly Convicted Lesbians Who’d Been Accused Of Devil Worship In the 90s

Entertainment

The San Antonio Four Were A Set Of Wrongly Convicted Lesbians Who’d Been Accused Of Devil Worship In the 90s

"Southwest of Salem"

In the ’90s, members of the LBGTQ community were finally starting to find some tolerance in mainstream culture. Most major cities around the world had a gay night scene and many small communities were being formed by lesbians and gay men. Unfortunately, LGBTQ people still encountered bigotry and homophobia regularly. From everyday altercations to murderous attacks, being gay in the ’90s was still dangerous.

That didn’t stop Elizabeth Ramirez from coming out and living her life as a gay woman. Although her hometown of San Antonio Texas was very conservative at the time, Ramirez was happily involved with her girlfriend, Kristie Mayhugh. The two were building a happy life together along with their close friends, Cassandra Rivera, and Anna Vasquez.

Unfortunately, devastating accusations would rock San Antonio and cost each women years of their freedom.

This is the story of the San Antonio Four and the horrible accusations and homophobia that led to their incarceration.

Twitter / @maurinanoe

The events that led to their imprisonment started innocently enough. The four women were staying together at the time. It was 1994 when they welcomed Ramirez’s young nieces into their home for a weeklong stay. After the visit, the girls’ father went to the police and reported a truly horrific story.

According to the father, Javier Limon, the girls had been sexually abused and tortured by the women. More than that, his accusations claimed they had been gang-raped in a Satanic ritual and “indoctrinated into a lesbian lifestyle.” The nieces were only 7 and 9 years old at the time.

The girls were interviewed several times and gave inconsistent statements with varying details. Physical examination found no major signs of sexual assault. However, prosecutors used child abuse specialist, Dr. Nancy Kellogg, to argue the opposite. In now-defunct testimony, Dr. Kellogg blamed common vaginal wear on abuse by the San Antonio women.

The San Antonio police department claimed that the women’s sexuality was not relevant to the investigation. Yet, their actions argue the opposite.

Twitter / @PopularLonerr

This case was during the Satanic Panic of the 1990s. The public was obsessed with news of Satanic rituals and cults during this time. Homosexuality was often linked to these reports of rituals and sex magic. It was also a common thought at the time that homosexuals were more likely to sexually harm children. Had the four women not been recently-outed lesbians, the police more than likely wouldn’t have pursued the complaints.

Likewise, had the women not been lesbians, the complaints probably never would’ve been made to begin with. Limon, the girls’ father, was romantically interested in Ramirez. The San Antonio man was her brother-in-law but he had expressed desire for her before. Notably, when she was just a teenager. Ramirez had rejected him before coming out. However, her happy relationship with Mayhugh probably encouraged Limon to retaliate against the women.

Sadly, the San Antonio Four were tried and found guilty. They each received between 15 to 37 years in prison for a crime that had no proof.

Twitter / @mercurymiya

It wasn’t until 2012 when any relief seemed likely for the jailed women. That year, one of Ramirez’s nieces recanted the allegations. Furthermore, she explained that her father, Limon, was to blame for the accusations. Her father, she said, threatened her and her sister as girls and continued the emotional abuse all their lives. This is what kept the San Antonio Four’s innocence a secret for so long.

In 2012, Vasquez was the first of the San Antonio Four to be released from prison. However, it was parole that released her, not her own innocence. It wouldn’t be until 2013 that the other three were released on bail while their guilt was reassessed. Later that same year, their sentences would be cut short and they would be declared innocent of all charges. The San Antonio Four were finally free.

Their struggle encouraged the documentary “Southwest of Salem: The Story of the San Antonio Four.” Now, you can stream the truth for yourself.

Twitter / @DaRealChrisCo

“Southwest of Salem” follows the redemption of the San Antonio Four. The documentary was released in 2016 but is now available to stream on both Hulu and Amazon Prime. It has a Rotten Tomatoes rating of 100% Fresh and is scored 7.1/10 on IMDd.com. The documentary also won a Peabody Award and won “Outstanding Documentary” at the 2017 GLAAD Media Awards.

“Southwest of Salem” clearly deals with difficult themes. However, it’s an important documentary to see — especially as more cases of police and prosecutor misconduct become uncovered. If we know of the atrocities that have happened in the past, we can stop them from ever happening again.

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