Entertainment

It Looks Like We All Have A Lot More In Common With Becky G Than Just A Love For Mayores

Becky G recently sat down for an interview with Billboard’s “Growing Up Latino” and we just fell in love with the Mayores singer even more.

Like I had no idea we had so much in common.

In the interview, she discusses her favorite Spanglish slang, childhood games, and her pride as a Latina musician. It’s so good!

Becky G we are here for you living your best life and owning your identity. We need more of this!

Many on Twitter were so grateful to hear her speak up as a Latina and to have a role model they can identify with.

Credit: @iambeckyg / Twitter

Growing up Latino, often the only role models you see are white ones or negative depictions of Latinos – characters created by Hollywood and the media.

So a huge shout out to Becky G and all the other incredible Latinos and Latinas helping change that.

Many were happy to see a woman celebrating her cultural heritage.

Credit: @iambeckyg / Twitter

We couldn’t be more proud of the singer for speaking up.

The “Sin Pijama” singer herself took to Twitter to promote the interview and proudly proclaim her identity, which she says is a huge part of who she is as a performer.

Credit: @iambeckyg / Twitter

Also, can we talk about how she used to play ‘tag’ as a kid growing up and how pozole and aguachile are her favorite foods?! #SAME

She’s helping empower women and girls just like her while trailblazing a whole new world for future generations of Latinas.

Credit: @latinomuseum / Twitter

It’s so beautiful to see a badass Latina use her huge platform as an entertainer to empower our community.

Many on Twitter were thrilled to find out just how much they have in common with the singer.

Credit: @BeckyGxAriana / Twitter

From saying ‘pero like…’ to a love for food, we all have something in common with Becky G.

Others just wanted to shout their love for the pop sensation from their Twitter account.

Credit: @alexiajwhite / Twitter

We feel you. We’re doing the same.

Becky G is also making headlines for her recent collaboration with Zayn Malik for “A Whole New World,” from Aladdin.

People are living for this track and all that it means for the Latino community.

Now excuse us while we stream “A Whole New World” for the rest of the afternoon.

Seriously, this song is so good.

Becky G, thank you for being who you are and empowering the next generation of Latinos and Latinas.

READ: Becky G Is Turning Into Princess Jasmine For Disney’s Upcoming “Aladdin” And Fans Couldn’t Be Happier

People On Social Media Criticized Becky G For Allegedly Stealing The Name Of Her New Makeup Line

Fierce

People On Social Media Criticized Becky G For Allegedly Stealing The Name Of Her New Makeup Line

Becky G has released her second line of cosmetics with ColourPop Thursday and another brand by the same name claims the artist stole its intellectual property. “Chiquita pero chingona!” the cruelty-free Becky G line advertises, saying “Becky G did it again with the realest collection yet, inspired by her roots and her parent’s love story.” Meanwhile, Hola Chola Inc., founded by Susana Gonzalez, sells clothing and accessories that commemorate the same 1990’s Mexican-American Chola culture that Becky G’s collection tributes. Complete with La Virgencita denim jackets and “Hola Chola” jewelry and accessories, Gonzalez even once met with Becky G’s team to discuss a collaboration. When Hola Chola Inc.’s followers saw Becky G’s collection, they called out Becky G for ripping Gonzalez off. The LA-based indie company began calling on fans to spread the word to their friends not to support Becky G’s collection. 

Eventually, Becky G and the Hola Chola Inc. founder spoke on the phone and deleted all the negative content, but people are still dissatisfied.

“Hola Chola is something that I say literally every single day,” Becky G says in her video campaign.

CREDIT: @IAMBECKYG / TWITTER

“When I wake up early in the morning, at 6 am, for hair and makeup call time, and I open the door and I’m like, “Hola Chola!” That’s just what we do,” Becky G adds in her campaign, citing “chola” as something that means strength and confidence. “The word ‘chola’, when you think of a ‘chola’, it can be, I think, whatever you want it to be. Obviously, it carries a lot of weight, too. It’s definitely a lifestyle more than it is just a ‘style’,” Becky G elaborates in her video. “There’s so much inspiration behind this collection for me!” Becky G posted to Instagram. “The biggest ones being my mom’s styles & influences that have been passed on to me and the boss ladies I’m surrounded by every day,” she added. According to Becky G herself, all the “inspiration” is “straight from my mom’s closet in high school in the 90s and my older cousins who would dress me up like them in the early 2000s 🖤” 

Becky G’s mother is a crucial element of her beauty campaign and even makes an appearance in the promo video. The two even collaborated on ideas together. “To me, the name chola just means a strong woman. It doesn’t mean necessarily tied up to anything bad, other than they were strong. They were down. They were, like, real,” Becky G’s mom says in the video promo. “We love the name chola.”

Hola Chola Inc. claims that, because Becky G’s team was aware of the brand, it’s intellectual property theft.

CREDIT: @HOLACHOLAINC / INSTAGRAM

Gonzalez says she sat down with Becky G’s team at one point to discuss a collab, and had sent Becky G a La Virgencita denim jacket. “I’m so enraged,” an Hola Chola Inc. model posted to Instagram. “Out of all the names in the world you had to go with one that already exists? One that YOU know about @iambeckyg. The industry has never been fair but it just sucks to see shit like this happen from our own people. Make sure to keep tagging the real OG HOLA CHOLA under their posts.” 

Apparently, @HolaCholaInc unfollowed Becky G after the backlash. Later, Becky G and Gonzalez spoke over the phone, and Becky G shared to her Instagram story that the two had cleared things up. Soon after, @HolaCholaInc refollowed Becky G and deleted all the negative criticism for the beauty brand.

Others aren’t buying it.

CREDIT: @IAMBECKYG / TWITTER

When one Instagram user posited that Hola Chola Inc’s outrage was misplaced, the response was less-than-direct. “OK, but where’s the makeup YOU sale…I’m sure you didn’t inspire it with the sweater you make …” asked Instagram user @issamerickyy. “Huh?! You have to much time on your hands kid, go read a book!” Hola Chola Inc. responded, ironically with her own grammar mistakes given her “go read a book” jab.

I see no similarity aside from the term and cultural aspect..,” chimed in one Twitter Latina. “I was expecting to see a like-minded cosmetics brand.. but they sell clothing, just under the same phrase (which was used widely by all of us Latinas for over a decade.) Pump the breaks.”

What do you think? Was the backlash warranted?

READ: Becky G Gets Called Out For Cultural Appropriation And Latinx Twitter Users Have Thoughts

Latinas In Texas Are Among The Most Affected By The Wage Gap And It’s Getting Worse

Fierce

Latinas In Texas Are Among The Most Affected By The Wage Gap And It’s Getting Worse

Unsplash

According to new research, Latina workers had to work until Nov. 20, 2019, to be paid the same wages as white non-Hispanic men in 2018, and it’s even worse in Texas. Representative Lizzie Fletcher (D-Houston) highlighted that fact on Latina Equal Pay Day, Nov. 20, in a tweet. “In Texas, Latinas make less than $0.45 for every dollar a man makes. That makes us 49th in the nation. The Senate must pass the (Paycheck Fairness Act) now. Latinas deserve better — we all do,” the Representative tweeted. Texas’s House of Representatives approved the Paycheck Fairness Act, sending it to the Senate for a vote back in March. The bill has been stalled in the Senate ever since. If passed into law, the Paycheck Fairness Act would increase penalties for employers that issue discriminatory wages to their workers. The bill would also require employers to report pay information to the Department of Labor, holding employers accountable for paying Latinas unfairly.

Last year, Latina Equal Pay Day was on Nov. 1, but Latinas have to work an extra 20 days than last year to make the same as their white male counterparts.

CREDIT: @REPFLETCHER / TWITTER

Last year, Texas was “the third-worst state for Latinas when it comes to the wage gap,” Maya Raghu, the Director of Workplace Equality at the National Women’s Law Center told Houston Public Media. She added that “the wage gap for Latinas has barely budged in about 30 years.” This year, Texas is the second-worst state in America for Latinas to make a living wage. Rep. Fletcher took Latina Equal Pay Day as an opportunity to push for legislation of the Paycheck Fairness Act. Later, Rep. Fletcher clarified her statement in a follow-up tweet, saying, “Someone asked the question, so to be clear: this statistic refers to white, non-Hispanic men.”

Rep. Fletcher received plenty of backlash from Twitter trolls, who nearly cried ‘white racism’ and spewed anti-immigrant rhetoric. “Why Latinas?  Why not just level it for all????  After all Latinas are your new majority. Who will be looking after the new minority?” asked Twitter user Shifty Schiff. “NO to #LatinaEqualPayDay !! Latinas crossing the border INCREASE chances Americans will be trafficked. #BuildTheWall traitor!!” tweeted another user in response to Rep. Fletcher. Another troll tweeted, “Equal opportunity, not equal outcome.  You can’t enforce equal outcome unless you take all opportunity away from everyone. This is not the job of government!”

In fact, reports show that the pay gap widens the more educated a Latina becomes.

CREDIT: LEANIN.ORG

Unfortunately, education appears to be a key factor, robbing Latinas of opportunities to compete in higher-wage fields because of the lack of access to education. In 2013, 19 percent of all Latina-Americans aged 25-29 had completed a college degree compared to 44 percent of white women, according to a government study. When you add documentation as a factor, the statistics plummet. Still, when you control for education, the gap only gets worse, according to the Bureau of Labor statistics. Latinas in the legal field are paid an average salary of $52,477 compared to white men who earn an average of $150,487, averaging a 65 percent pay gap, according to the Bureau of Labor. While Latina CEOs and General Managers are paid 35 percent less than their white non-Hispanic male counterparts.

More than half of Latina mothers are the primary income-earners in their household, and the disparities become inherited. Over the course of her career, the average Latina would earn over $1.1 million more if paid fairly, according to the National Partnership for Women & Families April 2019 report. The report cited that “if the wage gap were eliminated, on average, a Latina working full time, year-round would have enough money to afford one of the following: more than three additional years of child care, nearly 19 additional months of mortgage payments, more than two additional years of rent, almost two years of the maximum retirement contribution to her employer-sponsored 401(k) retirement account, or more than five years of the maximum retirement contribution to her Traditional or Roth IRA account.”

Nearly 1 in 3 Americans are not even aware of the Latina pay gap, according to a LeanIn.Org/SurveyMonkey poll.

CREDIT: LEANIN.ORG

A sample of 5,690 adults polled online between Oct. 25-29, 2019 showed that nearly 1,900 surveyors were not aware of the Latina pay gap. Half of them were not aware of the pay gap between Latinas and white women. The dollar for dollar wage gap is relevant when you control for job title, education, and location, but doesn’t factor in discrimination that favors white men over Latina women for promotion. The LeanIn.org/SurveyMonkey poll found that “for every 100 men who are promoted to manager, only 68 Latinas are promoted. This ‘broken rung’ results in more Latinas getting stuck at entry-level.”

READ: Today Is The Day To Stand Up Against This Horrible Latina Wage Gap And Here’s What You Can Do To Close It