Entertainment

This Chinese-Mexican Model Has A Superhuman Memory For Countries And Their Shapes

FOX / YouTube

This is what happens when you listen to your parents y te pones las pilas.

Courtney McCullough is an L.A.-based Mexican-Chinese actress, model, and photographer, but she’s got one peculiar skill: distinguishing countries based solely on their shape. McCullough was recently on FOX’s new show “SuperHuman,” with judge Christina Milian, and she showed America her impressive skills.

The premise of “SuperHuman” is simple. The show brings in people with “superhuman” abilities and tests their skills to see if they can live up to their claims. In McCullough’s case, she was given a group of shapes that contained two real countries. McCullough was challenged to distinguish which of the shapes were the real countries. After separating the real countries, she was then asked to name the countries just by their shapes.

As judge and brain surgeon Dr. Rahul Jandial said, the task is similar to someone giving you a puzzle, then dumping pieces from different puzzles on top and leaving you to figure out which ones are true and which ones aren’t. Spoiler: She totally rocked her challenge with a perfect score. Check it out.

McCullough spoke with mitú about being on the show, her impressive memory, and connecting with her Mexican roots.

McCullough is a Mexican-Chinese-American who has always been thoroughly connected to her Chinese roots, but only recently did she start exploring her Mexican half.

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A post shared by Courtney McCullough (@courtneymccullough6) on

McCullough told mitú that she grew up in a predominately Asian community so that side of her culture was always around her. Her Mexican side was always a mystery since she didn’t grow up with her Mexican family members nor was she exposed to Latino culture.

“It wasn’t until the election last year that I really began to embrace my heritage and what it means to be a Mexican in the USA,” McCullough told mitú. “I ended up traveling to Mexico 5 times within the last year to understand my culture a bit more and now I can proudly say I wear my multicultural ethnic background with pride.”

Mexico has even made it into her top favorite places she has visited.

At the Mayan ruins of Edzna. Thank you @escdann for the photo and wonderful tour ?

A post shared by Courtney McCullough (@courtneymccullough6) on

“The places that have been the most memorable for me are the Philippines for the friendliness of the people, southern Mexico for the hospitality, delicious food, and Mayan culture,” McCullough told mitú. “Sydney for its vibe; Jerusalem because there is nowhere else on earth like it;  Petra for its natural beauty; and Paris, because Paris.”

But, even though she has traveled so extensively, McCullough does say that competing on “SuperHuman” was definitely a challenge.

“In my day job as an actress and model, I am not unaccustomed to being on camera and making split second decisions, but this was a whole other level of nerves,” McCullough told mitú about her “SuperHuman” challenge.

And it only makes sense that such a well traveled person would find travel important for everyone’s personal growth.

“I think travel is important because it expands one’s world view and perspective,” McCullough told mitú. “I have personally grown so much from my experiences and have greater compassion and respect for humanity.”


PLAY: Take This Quiz And Find Out If Any Of That Geography You Learned Actually Sunk In

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Ana Navarro And Meghan McCain Got Into A Screaming Match On National TV, And People Are Praising Every Second Of It

Things That Matter

Ana Navarro And Meghan McCain Got Into A Screaming Match On National TV, And People Are Praising Every Second Of It

Youtube

We love a good throw down in the name of reality TV. Drama is what makes TV worth watching — it’s like a real-life telenovela, and we don’t care if people on TV are doing it just for the ratings. We live for it. One of our favorite reality shows — which is technically not a reality show, but rather a talk show — is “The View.” Those ladies can fight about anything. In this political climate of us vs. them — a/k/a the Republicans vs. the Democrats — you will not get a better TV experience, while also getting informative perspectives, than “The View.” 

And today’s episode did not disappoint. 

This might not come as a surprise, but Ana Navarro And Meghan McCain literally yelled at each other on “The View” and left viewers gasping for air. 

Credit: YouTube

The two “View” co-anchors got into a fighting match while discussing the latest Donald Trump scandal. Navarro, who typically appears on “The View” on Fridays, was discussing the topic of a whistleblower who came forward to say that President Donald Trump had talks with leaders of Ukraine in secret. 

McCain attempted to make a point — which didn’t actually make any sense — that liberals didn’t like how Julian Assage released classified documents yet had issues with the whistleblower disclosing information about Trump and Ukraine.  

McCain tried to correct herself and inadvertently began interrupting Navarro while she was speaking.

Credit: YouTube

Once McCain realized that her point didn’t make sense, she tried to correct herself as Navarro was talking, and she really wanted to every one to hear her, which is why she began speaking very, very loudly. 

“Excuse me, maybe I was clumsy in the way that I said it,” McCain said rather forcefully. Then Navarro said, pretty calmly, “you don’t have to scream at me.”  

McCain said to Navarro, “I don’t know what you just said.” Navarro responded by saying, I said, don’t scream at me. I’m two feet away!”

Credit: YouTube

The audience was clearly in shock, and McCain said, “you know, that’s so rude, Ana.” They quickly cut to a commercial break, but the camera definitely caught McCain walking off the set. By the time the show returned, it was as if the whole thing never happened. It was so weird! They began to talk about another topic, and the two ladies behaved pretty chill toward each other. It almost reminded us of how we are during Thanksgiving dinner when one moment we are fighting with everyone and the next, we’re all good friends again. 

Even though the spat lasted two seconds, people on social media ate up the drama with a spoon.

We love a good fight, but that doesn’t mean they have to get physical. That would be the end of “The View”! 

You know we had to pick a side. 

We’re always rooting for our girl, Ana. Always!

Why did the segment get so heated in the first place?

These ladies can throwdown about anything, honestly. McCain has a thin skin because she always gets frustrated that enough people do not agree with her. 

The two women have gone head-to-head in the past, and we can see why they have more tension lately. 

McCain’s husband has made fun of Navarro on Twitter. What the heck?

We can always count on Navarro to piss her off. 

This is not the first time Navarro and McCain have not seen eye-to-eye on a topic; in fact, fighting is what they do best. We’re just a bit surprised at the tone that it got to today. 

McCain was clearly more pissed off at the fact that she messed up her point entirely.

McCain didn’t explain herself well in the first place, so we’re thinking her error plus the fact that everyone else was not seeing her point is what made her upset. Navarro has never backed down if she has felt disrespected.

McCain is going to have to toughen up if she wants to last on the show.

Lots of women have left “The View” because they’re tired of the bickering, so McCain better get a grip or she going to end up going back to Fox News. Girl, we are begging you DO NOT LEAVE “THE VIEW”! 

If McCain leaves, who will fight with Navarro or any of the other women?

Out of all the other Republican hosts on “The View” McCain is our favorite, so we are pleading. Stick it out, girl. It’s Friday, let’s get a drink and pretend like this never happened. 

Check out the whole exchange below, and get some popcorn too!

READ: Watch Ana Navarro Take Down Meghan McCain On ‘The View’ While Debating DACA

Meet Frederico Vigil, The Creator Of The Largest Concave Fresco in North America – Mundos De Mestizaje

Culture

Meet Frederico Vigil, The Creator Of The Largest Concave Fresco in North America – Mundos De Mestizaje

Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

When visiting the National Hispanic Cultural Center campus in Albuquerque, New Mexico, it’s easy to write-off the upside-down, bucket shape form rising from the ground. It stands alone with no distinguishing marks. There are no large crowds to hint at the remarkable secret hidden inside. Visitors will know they are in the right place when the gray asphalt and concrete beneath their feet morph into red—matching the building’s exterior.

Two, towering wood doors mark the entry into the nondescript building.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

When the doors swing open, it’s impossible to avoid looking up because the vibrant colors of the ceiling act as a magnet, drawing eyes upwards. Step into the 45-foot dome-shaped structure to get a better look, and there, in the small Southwest town of less than 1 million, the largest fresco painting in North America wraps around the ceiling.

El Torreón is the name of the structure which houses Mundos de Mestizaje.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

The larger-than-the-Sistine-Chapel fresco made by Frederico Vigil. It took the Santa Fe native almost three years to have it approved and 10 years to complete it. The aerial artwork depicts thousands of years of Hispanic and pre-Hispanic history. Depending on your cultural background, some iconography is easy to spot and place in history. If you’re Mexican, La Virgen de Guadalupe, a portrait of the beloved civil rights leader Benito Juárez and the eagle, serpent, and nopal from Mexico’s coat of arms will stand out. But walk around the room, or sit in one of the lounging chairs that allow visitors to tip back and view the work at 180 degrees, and soon you’ll realize there are hidden figures among the more popular markers of Mexican and Indigenous identity.

“I’m a mixed man with many different bloodlines,” Vigil says on a phone call. “I’m mestizo. I wanted to show the history of what that means.”

For the project, Vigil consulted with seven scholars on Mesoamerican and Spanish historical culture in order to create an accurate depiction of the past.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

He says that just by looking at the Iberian Peninsula, there’s a mix of Romans, Celts, Muslims, and Phoenicians which is all tied into Spanish identity. Then, with the Americas, there’s Maya, Aztec and Toltec. The history of these lines iS not linear. They overlap, intertwine and blend together in a dizzying ride that Vigil worked to bring to life in Mundos de Mestizaje. 

The purpose is to show the viewer how interconnected and far-reaching culture is. Islamic philosopher Ibn Rushd is depicted sitting next to Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, a Medieval Torah scholar, and physician. Chacmool, the pre-Columbian sculpture found throughout Mesoamerica shares space with George Washington and an African slave. 

“There are no purebloods, we are all mixed—or perhaps the only people who can say they are of pure blood are the Amazons or indigenous tribes that have lived in isolation,” Vigil says. “When people begin to study the past, they realize we, as a society, are not genetically one thing.”

Vigil learned the art of fresco painting from Lucienne Bloch and Stephen Pope Dimitroff. The couple might not be household names outside of the art community, but their bosses were. Bloch and Dimitroff were assistants to the world-renowned Mexican artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. 

Vigil connected with the couple thanks to the Santa Fe Council for The Arts.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

The organization reached out to Vigil to gauge his interest in a scholarship learning from the pair. Now in their 70s, the two aging artists were making strides to ensure their knowledge was passed down to a new generation of creators. Art lessons were accompanied by tales of the past that included Kahlo, Rivera, and friends such as Leon Trotsky. There, he learned the complicated and time-consuming process of fresco painting.

A surface is rough plastered with a mix of lime, sand, and cement. On average, a layer takes 10-12 hours to dry. A painter can go to work an hour into the drying process and usually has between seven to nine hours of time to complete their design. The art then needs 7-10 days between coats. If the painter messes up, they have to scrape off the layers and begin again.

“I’m a procrastinator but when the wall is wet, you have to paint,” says Vigil. “Each painting is a new experience. It doesn’t get old.”

Vigil is currently working on a new 2,500-plus square foot monumental fresco at the Albuquerque Convention Center.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

His new work tells the tale of New Mexico’s history as the oldest state in the U.S. to produce wine. He says the piece could take four to six years to complete. He’s currently in his second year.

The hours for the Torreón (where the fresco is housed) are Saturdays and Sundays from 12-5 p.m., plus it is open by appointment, which can be scheduled with Juanita Ramírez at Juanita.ramirez@state.nm.us or 505-383-4774. The NHCC presents concerts in the Torreón in partnership with the Pimentel & Sons Guitar Makers. The Torreón is available for rentals under certain circumstances and with some restrictions. 

READ: 20 Bizarre Nail Art Ideas That I Just Will Never Understand