Entertainment

The World’s Highest-Paid YouTuber Made $29 Million In 2019 And Their Identity May Surprise You

YouTube is an incredible place where you can find videos on just about any kind of topic, told by every type of person on earth. You have the expert makeup artists, the wannabe influencers, aspiring singers, little kids filming random stuff. All of them may not care to be the next Internet superstar, but they indeed seek viewership and subscribers. But what we love about this story is that the most popular YouTuber isn’t a high-profile makeup influencer or model but a little kid who makes learning a joy. 

In 2019, the highest-earning YouTuber is 8-year-old Ryan Kaji, who made a whopping $29 million. Oh, and it’s the second consecutive year he has come in at No. 1. 

Ryan first got on YouTube at just 3-years-old, of course with the help of his parents, and back then, his channel was all about testing out toys. Now he’s moved on to more educational videos, which we think is terrific. He informs his millions of subscribers how to brush their teeth, how to recycle, and why it’s essential, and other cool things like conducting experiments. 

His channel is called Ryan’s world and has more than 23 million subscribers.

The revenue typically comes from sponsors of his channel, which include companies such as Walmart, Hasbro, Netflix, Chuck E. Cheese, and Nickelodeon, the New York Times reports. Aside from his sponsors, Kaji also makes his millions by having shows on Nickelodeon and Hulu. He also has a toy line and clothing collection, CNBC reports.

The rest of the top five YouTubers includes the cast of Dude Perfect, who made $20 million, a 5-year-old Russian-born girl named Anastasia Radzinskaya made $18 million with her videos of her and her dad playing with toys. Rhett McLaughlin and Link Neal, host Good Mythical Morning (not kids), made $17.5 million, and makeup expert Jeffree Star made $17 million. We wonder how these adults feel about coming in fourth and fifth place after a couple of kids. But hey, millions are still millions. 

The most popular video on Ryan’s World channel features Ryan playing with huge eggs. It has more than 1.9 billion views.

The video focuses on Ryan, who was much younger, playing with huge eggs inside a giant inflatable water slide. The whole thing was a challenge of sorts in which viewers watched how many eggs he could get. Each egg also had a toy. Sounds fascinating, right? I’m sure it is for younger children. 

In another video, No. 2 for the most popular clip, which has more than a billion views, has Ryan opening a giant Disney Pixar Lightning McQueen Easter egg surprise filled with cars and planes toys for kids. Kids must really love giant eggs. 

But of course, with that kind of revenue comes scrutiny and Ryan’s World channel has come under fire from a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. 

Credit: ryansworld / Instagram

In September, someone filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission and accused Ryan’s World of not being transparent with their toy reviews. The complaint, in essence, accuses Ryan’s World of not informing its viewers, which are typically children, of disclosing which products were sponsored by a company and which toys were being reviewed organically by Ryan, meaning without payment. 

The New York Times reports that at least 90 percent of the Ryan ToysReview video, which was what his channel was previously called, “included at least one paid product recommendation.”

“A 5-year-old isn’t going to understand that Ryan’s talking about the toys because Target is paying him to talk about the toys,” Josh Golin, the executive director of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, told the Times. “There may be some disclosure, but disclosure isn’t meaningful to a child that young.”

Ryan’s dad responded to those accusations by saying they have always complied with regulations and advertising disclosure requirements. 

“As the streaming space continues to quickly grow and evolve,” Shion Kaji said to the Times, “We support efforts by lawmakers, industry representatives and regulators such as the F.T.C. to continuously evaluate and update existing guidelines and lay new ground rules to protect both viewers and creators.”

READ: A Mexican YouTuber Is Going Viral For This Video Of Him Eating Two Habaneros As Part Of A Dare And It’s Hard To Watch

Moms Are Sharing Videos Of How To Make Their Comida For Their College-Bound Kids After A Mom’s Burrito-Folding Video Went Viral

Culture

Moms Are Sharing Videos Of How To Make Their Comida For Their College-Bound Kids After A Mom’s Burrito-Folding Video Went Viral

Michelle Gonzaes / YouTube

Last week, California Polytechnic State University student, April Olvera posted a video sent to her by her mamá, and the video went viral, already wracking up nearly ten million views, and nearly one million likes in less than seven days.

Olvera, away at college, texted her mom, Silvia Dominguez, to say that she didn’t know how to fold a burrito, and her mom sent her a video that contained a soothing video-folding lesson.

While some couldn’t help but wonder why Olvera didn’t know how to fold a burro, her mamí’s special brand of cariño shown in the forty-second burrito-folding lesson was the focus of the comments that followed.

Other Latinas needed the lesson too!

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Another Latina Twitter user, couldn’t get over the way Olvera’s mother, Silvia, repeated the lesson.

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Two guys commented on Olvera’s mom’s soothing voice, but we think @carys_arsenic nailed it.

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And this guy too who points out Ms. Dominguez’s calm in the face of a world that seems to be coming apart at the seams.

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When Olvera told her mother that her video went viral and inspired so many positive comments, Dominguez said, “Maybe it’s not the burrito. Maybe it’s about family and love.”

Burrito-folding-lesson mom, Silvia Dominguez, speaks Spanish in the video, smiling the whole time, clearly happy to be able to help her daughter away at college with anything, using her own phone propped up on the counter to capture the lesson.

“Okay,” she says in Spanish, holding up a corn tortilla, “Imagine that this is my flour tortilla. Add what you’re going to use, fold it from this side, fold it from that side, and roll it. Did you see that?

And then she unrolls the burro and repeats the steps: It’s a circle. Fold it here, fold it here, and roll it. Nice! Okay, bye. I love you.”

We also like how Burrito-Folding-Lesson Mom is even helping grown-ass men.

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@rsencion
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And because imitation is the most sincere form of flattery, here’s a video made by the author for her son on his way to college in the fall.

Watch the video below.

READ: Yalitza Aparicio Brought Her Mother To The Oscars And Other Incredible Things Latinas Did Last Night

White Parent Shouts ‘Why Didn’t You Stay In Mexico?” At Father During School Meeting To Address Racist Incidents

Things That Matter

White Parent Shouts ‘Why Didn’t You Stay In Mexico?” At Father During School Meeting To Address Racist Incidents

MLive / YouTube

Far too often we talk of stories about racist White people caught on video berating people of color or calling police on them for mundane, everyday tasks. Unfortunately, this is another one of those stories but one with a level of irony that seems like it was completely lost on the man who hurled the racist insult.

Racism in the United States continues to tear apart communities – and, as this story shows, even in communities that are working to try and address the concerns of people most affected.

A viral video shows a Michigan dad asking a Latino man why he didn’t ‘stay in Mexico’ during a school meeting about racism.

A community meeting meant to address concerns over racism in a Michigan school district appeared to become proof of the problem after a white parent suggested to a Latino father that he shouldn’t have immigrated to the United States.

Adrian Iraola, who came to the U.S. from Mexico and whose now-grown children went through the schools in Saline, recalled his son’s experience of racism in the district.

“I went to his bedroom to say good night, and he was crying because of the abuse that he was enduring in this school system,” Iraola said at the school board meeting Monday in the largely-white district south of Ann Arbor.

Iraola was interrupted by a white parent, Tom Burtell, who said, “So why didn’t you stay in Mexico?”

Reactions from other parents in the room were mostly of shock and disgust.

The comment drew loud gasps and threw the February 3 meeting into pandemonium, with multiple parents yelling at the father to leave the meeting, some standing up, and one shouting, “That is disgusting.”

“That’s indicative of what our kids are experiencing: comments like that,” another father said.

However, at least one person seemed to come to Burtell’s defense saying that the meeting was a “platform for discussion,” to which Burtell responses, “That’s right.”

“Then explain yourself,” an audience member said to Burtell. “You interrupted [Iraola]. Take the mic.”

Iraola, still with mic in hand, then said, “He asked me a question, ‘Why didn’t I stay in Mexico?’ Because this is the greatest country in the world.”

But Burrell wasn’t done yet.

Credit: MLive.com / YouTube

During the meeting, Burtell also complained about discrimination being faced by white people.

“You think that … whites are the oppressors,” he said. “Here’s the evidence. You’ve got black racism all the time… try to be white and walk in a black neighborhood and see what happens.”

Even Burtell’s own son took to Facebook to call his father out for his racist comment.

Today my father asked a deliberately racist question at the Saline Area Schools diversity and inclusion meeting.His…

Posted by Matt Burtell on Monday, February 3, 2020

His comments were so provocative that Burtell’s son, Matt, condemned him in a Facebook post.

“Today my father asked a deliberately racist question at the Saline Area Schools diversity and inclusion meeting. His views of hate in no way represent my own,” Matt Burtell wrote. “I stand in solidarity with the refugees and immigrants of the world.”

The meeting was originally called to address racist bullying and taunts experienced by children at the school.

Credit: Nicole Hester / AP

The meeting had originally been organized to address instances of racism at high schools in the town of Saline, and a Latino father had taken the microphone to discuss how his son suffered from racist taunts in school.