Entertainment

Tekashi69’s Undocumented Driver Cooperated With Federal Authorities To Avoid Being Deported

Rapper Tekashi69 has been all over social media lately with memes making fun of the musician in court. Tekashi69, whose real name is Daniel Hernandez, was in court testifying against two Nine Trey Bloods gang members in a case of racketeering and firearms brought against the gang. However, it was Hernandez’s driver who got the rapper involved in the court case.

Tekashi69’s driver, Jorge Rivera, served as an informant for federal authorities after being arrested by ICE for being undocumented.

Credit: @KollegeKidd / Twitter

According to Rivera’s testimony in court, the driver was arrested in May 2018 for being undocumented. It was while he was in ICE detention that he started to cooperate with federal authorities on their case about Nine Trey Bloods gang, of which Daniel Hernandez was associated with.

Rivera continued to work with the feds after being released from ICE detention on July 2018.

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According to New York Daily News, Rivera was hired back as Hernandez’s driver shortly after being released from ICE detention. As part of his cooperation with federal officials, Rivera installed two cameras in the SUC he used to drive the Brooklyn driver around. The cameras captured a moment when two gang members, one of which he is testifying against, rear-ended the car and kidnapped Hernandez.

“I thought we were going to get killed. And we would be robbed,” Rivera said in Manhattan Federal Court through a Spanish interpreter, according to New York Daily News.

Rivera admits that he worked with the federal authorities because he wanted to avoid being deported because of his undocumented status.

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Rivera acknowledged that he would be receiving a 5K1 letter as part of his agreement to cooperate. A 5K1 letter is a letter drafted by the United States Attorney and given to a federal judge who is presiding over a case. The letter can allow for the judge to give leniency to witnesses who cooperate with authorities investigating and trying the case.

It is unclear if Rivera has any prior convictions but he is hopeful that the 5K1 letter will limit his own sentence after pleading guilty to charges of racketeering, weapons possession and robbery. He also hopes that the letter will spare him from being deported.

There has been talk about relocating Hernandez with witness protection since his testimony in court has been met with death threats.

Credit: @nytimes / Twitter

Thousands of people have been relocated with the United States Federal Witness Protection Program since 1971. The program is used to protect witnesses who testify in court against defendants, especially if there is any chance that the witness and their family are in immediate danger of retribution. Hernandez’stestimoney in the court has led prosecutors to begin considering the program for Hernandez.

Hernandez’s testimony has also decimated his reputation in the music industry.

Credit: snoopdogg / Instagram

Snoop Dogg is one of the many people Tekashi69 has said is part of the Nine Trey Bloods gang. The list of people includes Cardi B and Jim Jones.

People have used the moment to remind everyone of Martha Stewart’s prison sentence and her refusal to name names.

Credit: @Chinchilla_773 / Twitter

What do you think about Tekashi69’s testimony?

READ: Soundcloud Latino Rappers And Their Controversies That Shook Their Fans

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California Is Poised To Become The First State To Offer Unemployment To Undocumented Workers

Things That Matter

California Is Poised To Become The First State To Offer Unemployment To Undocumented Workers

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Covid-19 has devastated families financially, especially Latinos. Latino households have experienced disproportionate levels of unemployment and health issues from Covid-19. California is helping undocumented people impacted by the virus.

California is going to help undocumented people struggling during the prolonged Covid-19 pandemic.

On Monday, the California legislature released a stimulus package to help Californians suffering during the pandemic. The “Major Components of Joint Economic Stimulus Plan” includes financially assisting undocumented people living in California. The plan further stipulates that the state would create a fund to assist those who will lose when the $600 unemployment benefits disappear and any other holes that might remain in the economic injuries of residents.

People are defending the use of tax dollars to help undocumented immigrants.

Undocumented people pay taxes. It is a narrative that anti-immigrant people push to further harm the undocumented community. Advocates have argued that the undocumented community should be protected during this pandemic as much as anyone else. This plan would likely do that.

“Our calls for prompt relief and a bit of human kindness have been heard and we hope soon not another family will go hungry or without essentials such as medication, bars of soap and other hygiene products, as the COVID-19 pandemic wreaks havoc in the Golden State,” Angelica Salas, executive director for the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, said in a statement.

The virus is still spreading in the U.S. with California being one of the worst-hit states.

The state set a record on July 29 with 12,904 new Covid cases and 192 deaths. The state has been criticized for rushing its reopening strategy that led to a visible explosion of cases in mid-June. That is when California restrictions were lifted before meeting the health guideline standards for a safe reopening.

Latinos are the most impacted community. More Latino households have seen illness and sudden joblessness across the U.S. The federal government has left out undocumented people, who pay taxes, from assistance using tax dollars. California might be the first state to rectify that.

READ: Boston Red Sox Pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez Suffering From Covid-Related Heart Inflammation

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Nonprofit United We Dream Is Crowdsourcing Immigrant Recipes For A Fundraising Cookbook

Culture

Nonprofit United We Dream Is Crowdsourcing Immigrant Recipes For A Fundraising Cookbook

unitedwedream / Instagram

During the COVID-19 lockdowns, people have spent a lot of time in their kitchens cooking food to bring them comfort. One unique thing about the self-isolation is that people are having to figure out how to make things stretch or substitute some of your usual ingredients. United We Dream wants to make sure they can do something good with all of the recipes we have created.

United We Dream wants to use your recipes to create some good.

According to an Instagram post, United We Dream is putting together an undocumented cookbook. In the spirit of sharing recipes and cultural moments, United We Dream is asking for people to submit their recipes.

“At United We Dream we believe in the power of art and culture to change hearts and minds and June is the perfect time to tap into our cultural creativity,” reads the United We Dream website. “On Immigrant Heritage Month, we want to celebrate our community through a joyous art form that every household does: cooking!”

The money is going to be used to help the undocumented and immigrant communities.

Credit: unitedwedream / Instagram

According to Remezcla, 100 percent of profits from the book will go to the organization’s National UndocuFunds. United We Dream launched the National UndocuFund to deliver financial assistance to undocumented people struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is likely that the fund will need to do some extra lifting to help communities recovering from recent looting and rioting that has rocked the U.S. in recent days.

“We know that nothing brings people together quite like food,” reads the United We Dream website. “The dishes that immigrants create, no matter how simple or complex, allow people to experience cultures other than one’s own and all the joys and pleasures that come with it.”

The cookbook is already getting people excited.

Credit: unitedwedream / Instagram

There is something to be said about people getting creative in the kitchen during this pandemic. Outings are limited because we are all staying home to slow the spread. There are also people who are still not at work. That is why we have had to get creative to make our food last.

“Today, times are tough because of COVID-19, but many working-class and poor households are embracing their creativity to create meals that both sustain their households and bring a moment of peace and comfort,” reads the United We Dream website. “We want to create a cookbook that reflects our diverse community and inspires memories of joy, comfort and togetherness!”

United We Dream understands the power of food.

Food is a unifier. Everyone eats and food is one way to connect with your culture. It is also a wonderful way to share your culture with other people. Sharing your food and culture with people is a special way to let your friends into your life.

The organization is still taking recipe suggestions. If you want a chance to give more people a look into who you are and your culture through food, click here to share a recipe.

READ: Colorado Organization Raises Money To Offer Relief Checks To Undocumented People In The State

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