Entertainment

From Serving Tacos To Being Signed With The LA Dodgers, Here’s What We Know Of The LA Dodger’s New Pitcher

In the history of major league baseball, there have been dozens upon dozens of players that were born in Mexico. It’s no secret that major league baseball is home to many Latino players, but when they’re from Mexico and play for the Los Angeles Dodgers it’s even more special. Now, there’s a new member of the Dodger family — a young man with a dream to play in the major leagues. 

The L.A. Dodgers signed an 18-year-old left-handed pitcher, with a 93-mph fastball, from Jalisco, Mexico.

Credit: Primer Impacto / YouTube

Octavio Becerra, from Capilla de Guadalupe, Jalisco, was formerly a player for the Mexican team Aguascalientes Rieleros, when a scout, Juvenal Soto, saw him play. In an interview with Primer Impacto, Becerra recalls the day that a Soto saw him play in Mexico. He said he was pitching like normal. He said the two were talking and then Soto asked him about his pitching technique. The scout then said, “I’ll be back soon with some news.” Soto wasn’t kidding. An hour and a half later, he returned to tell him that he was signed to play for the Dodgers. 

Back home in Jalisco, when Becerra wasn’t playing for his local baseball team, he was working at a taco restaurant. 

Credit: Primer Impacto / YouTube

Becerra stayed busy as a waiter, a cook, and a delivery guy at a taco eatery in his home state. His boss playfully said that if he doesn’t make it in the major leagues he can always work as a waiter at Taco Bell. All joking aside, his boss told Primer Impacto that he wished the best for the young man. 

As a new player for the Dodgers, Becerra’s contract requires a start in the minor leagues. Dodgers Nation said he is the “most highly-touted prospect.”

Credit: rielerosags / Instagram

According to the Dodgers Nation, “Becerra has thrown just 18 1/3 innings for the Aguascalientes of the Mexican League across two seasons, posting a 9.82 ERA and 2.40 WHIP. Take these stats with a grain of salt considering Becerra is playing in a league where the average age is 29.6 years old at just 18.” They add, “He was ranked as the #1 prospect in La Liga Mexicana de Beisból coming into the 2019 season. That is a high-profile signing considering his potential and experience in one of the world’s premier leagues outside of the United States.”

His mom got emotional when recalling all of the hard work he has put into his passion, and all of the support she has given him over the years.

Credit: Primer Impacto / YouTube

His mom told Primer Impacto that ever since Becerra was a little boy he always had a plastic bat and helmet and practice playing. He has played baseball his entire life. She said parents must always support their children whatever their passion is. She said that by supporting their children in anything they do, that is the only way they can ever achieve success.

She’s not the only one that is proud of his success. His home team in Jalisco is thrilled for the young player. 

Credit: RielerosDeAguascalientes / Facebook

“We are very proud to be able to present Octavio’s signature today with the Los Angeles Dodgers, which as we know is an organization that has always trusted the Mexican baseball player, we wish the greatest success for Octavio, because we know that today It is the first step to achieve the dream of reaching the majors, he is a player with discipline and a lot of work, so we are sure he will have a career full of successes,” the President of the Club Rieleros, José Eustacio Álvarez said. 

Becerra said signing the contract came with many emotions. He said it was a moment he always dreamed about but wasn’t sure it would come true. 

Credit: Primer Impacto / YouTube

“I am very happy and very proud of what is happening; Suddenly one feels sad because if you are in the first team you suddenly return to the Academy,” he said according to the Aguascalientes Rieleros Facebook page. “But I feared it with a great philosophy and I decided that I would do my best, I started working hard because I knew that some team of Big League could look at me; then it came out that I was the prospect 1 of the entire League and it was an extra motivation to achieve the goal, which fortunately today is met, with this signature with the Los Angeles Dodgers.” 

Well, we couldn’t more excited to have a Mexican player on the team. Congrats, Octavio!

Watch his interview below.

READ: Dodgers Star Pitcher, Julio Urias, Spent The Night In Jail After Shoving A Woman To The Ground And People Are Disgusted

500 Years After The Conquest Of Mexico Began, Descendants Of Both Cortes And Moctezuma Meet

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500 Years After The Conquest Of Mexico Began, Descendants Of Both Cortes And Moctezuma Meet

The scars of the Spanish colonization of what is now known as Mexico are still fresh in the racial, social and political relationships that shape the Latin American country. Current president Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has continuously demanded Spain and the Catholic Church to apologize for the many crimes perpetuated against indigenous populations during La Conquista and La Colonia, periods in which the European colonizers imposed their will by brute force, enslaving the original owners of the land.

A recent event brought together two of the direct descendants of the Spanish conqueror, Hernan Cortes, and the conquered Aztec emperor, Moctezuma. The meet up was organized by filmmaker Miguel Gleason, who is making a documentary about the conquest. They met at a church were Cortes is buried. 

Yes, it has been 500 years since Tenochtitlan, the capital of the Aztec empire, fell, but the episode still resonates with today’s Mexicans.

Contrary to other countries that were born out of European invasions, such as New Zealand, the indigenous population in Mexico has not been fully assimilated into political life, and many decisions are made for them in the higher echelons of power.

The story of the conquest is still seen as an us versus them, and even for Mexicans who are casually racist against indigenous people on an everyday basis there is a tinge of historical resentment against the Spanish.

It is important to point out that the Conquista was brutal: it was not the joyous founding of a new country, but a bloodshed that saw the indigenous population wiped out by guns and diseases such as smallpox for which they had no antibodies. It was cruel. To add insult to injury, they were also conquered ideologically and religiously by envoys from the Catholic Church that were hand in hand with the Spanish Crown. 

Un abrazo that is worth a thousand words… but are they empty words?

With much fanfare, surrounded by cameras and reporters, two men shared an embrace 500 years after their ancestors first met in 1519 and changed the history of the world.

Federico Acosta, a Mexican man whose family is directed down 16 generations to the daughter of Moctezuma, met with Ascanio Pignatelli, an Italian citizen related to Cortés’ daughter. Pignatelli’s family held one of  the conquistador’s noble titles, but sold it over 150 years ago. This was a heartfelt moment, but perhaps is was too naive. The event was covered by the Mexican and international media, but one should wonder the impact it could really have beyond the wow factor. Acosta said: “It’s not that there were good people and bad people. It’s that, that’s the way things were done”. Excuse us? 

This was a tender media moment, and it is an ideal scenario in terms of reconciliation. But how much can an act like this actually mean?

Pignatelli told Acosta: “I want to ask your forgiveness for all the bad things that happened. We need to leave the past behind us. Today is a day for leaving all the bad things in the past”.

This apology sounds all fine and dandy, but what does it mean for today’s world?

Acosta said: “We are the fusion of two cultures, the European and ours. We are the result of that meeting, the vast majority of us have Spanish and Mexican blood”.

And what Acosta said is true. Today’s Mexico is made up of a melange of heritages that extends far beyond Spain and the Aztec Empire. On the indigenous side there is Olmec, Mixtec, Maya, Tarahumara and many, many other ethnic groups that are often forgotten and still live under precarious conditions, akin to colonial times. On the European side, there have been German, French, Portuguese, European Jewish and all sorts of migrations. So Mexican identity is much more than an Aztec/Spanish dichotomy. 

Now AMLO is asking for an apology… again.

Pignatelli’s apology is something that the current Mexican president AMLO would like to hear from the Spanish Crown. His government’s ideology is based on a look into history and the many debts accumulated towards the marginal sectors of Mexican society. Among them, of course, are indigenous Mexicans.

He said: “I still ask the king of Spain and Pope Francis, humbly, that they apologize for the abuses committed during the conquest and the colonial domination”. This would be a merely symbolic act, as economic elites dominate the country regardless, oftentimes, of race.

Also, this view perpetuates the us vs them political imaginary that perhaps ends up not being very productive at all. But then again, AMLO’s ideological postulates are based on a revisionist approach to history. 

FOMO Alert: Ugly Primo’s Party In Los Angeles Showcasing His Art Gave Everyone A Chance To Celebrate Him

Entertainment

FOMO Alert: Ugly Primo’s Party In Los Angeles Showcasing His Art Gave Everyone A Chance To Celebrate Him

uglyprimo / Instagram

Ugly Primo has been capturing Latino pop culture moments in his vivid illustrations since early 2018, illustrating the “Suavamente” Elvis Crespo into fabric softener and Cardi B as a “Farti B cushion.” While we have no idea what Ugly Primo looks like, since he hides behind an actual cholo puppet, we know that, for the first time ever, Ugly Primo showcased his work.

Ugly Primo invited everyone to the Primos Playhouse to, well, party. Ugly Primo’s Instagram bio has long advertised himself as a “retired quinceañera DJ,” and people finally got to hear him spin. After DJ sets by J Valentino, 2DEEP, Mija Doris, and Brü, the puppet, or the man behind the puppet, took to the stage. Best of all: it was free.

Of course, Ugly Primo’s version of a gallery was called a Playhouse, so you know it was fun.

Credit: @uglyprimo / Twitter

Held in downtown Los Angeles, a free DJ event with dope art is my kind of night. Our favorite primo tweeted that, “There will be exclusive merch, art installations, music by some friends, and drinks for my 21+ borrachos. Hope to see you there!”

Ugly Primo is kind of *excellent* at creating unique merch.

Credit: @uglyprimo / Twitter

It seems like the world’s coolest puppet is pretty close with San Benito, and worked with the trapetero to create on-brand chanclas for Bad Bunny fans. They’re reportedly too holy to be weaponized for the chanclazo. You may have seen Ugly Primo’s art on up-and-coming artist Cuco Puffs’s most recent album cover, too. It’s weird how Ugly Primo is everywhere, but nobody has seen him.

Ugly Primo might just be our favorite primo after the artwork he’s gifted us this last year alone.

Credit: @uglyprimo / Instagram

During the height of Nio Garcia, Ozuna, Darrel, Nicky Jam, Casper Magico and Bad Bunny’s “Te Bote” classic, Ugly Primo blessed America with an auspicious illustration. In an effort to motivate his fans to get out and vote, he released an image of a very orange Donald Trump at a podium stickered with “Yo voté,” followed by a “Te bote” stamp of disapproval. His blessing on the midterms did give us Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. We need more illustrations, Primo.

If only a Mercado de mucho, mucho amor existed.

Credit: @uglyprimo / Instagram

Internationally-acclaimed astrologer Walter Mercado may have passed earlier this week, but he’s been long honored by Ugly Primo. For Mercado’s haters, they love the idea that his predictions and, “sobre todo, mucho, mucho amor” was up for sale. For everyone else, we loved what Mercado was selling – his genderless fashion sense and exuberant love for his fans.

When Cumbia legend Celso Piña passed, he was immortalized in vibrant colors as well.

Credit: @uglyprimo / Instagram

The cumbia artist, known as El Rebelde del acordeón, passed on August 21 at just 66 years old from a heart attack. The Mexican accordionist pioneered a fusion of tropical salsa sounds with cumbia and regional mexicano.

When Cardi B was freely expressing her flatulence on the ‘gram, Ugly Primo immortalized the pop culture moment.

Credit: @uglyprimo / Instagram

“Farti B is steaming hot. Swipe for some 💨💨💨,” Ugly Primo captioned his June edition to his works, alongside a hilarious anthology of Cardi B’s most recent fart sprees. “Damn, I farted but that was a very low fart, so y’all can’t hear it. It’s one of those farts that like, they don’t really stink, it’s just air,” Cardi told her Instagram fans back in June 2019. “I gotta fart so bad. I’m about to air it out. I farted, I farted, I farted, I farted,” Cardi said. “Oh it STANK. You smell it, Ashley? It’s gonna hit you though. You smell it?” she asked, cackling.

Ugly Primo has helped us envision a world made for Latinos, here in America.

@uglyprimo / Instagram

Ugly Primo’s artistry is embedded in Latinizing mainstream items, like slapping “Tigers of the North” on a box of frosted flakes, with a guitar playing tiger and more. We get to imagine what a Trader Jose’s might look like, and even though Los Angeles is plentiful with Hispanic grocer’s, Ugly Primo uses the brand recall of a national chain to make that experience feel like the true cornerstone of American identity that it is. We belong here. We’re not going anywhere.

LA, if you’re looking for a party, it’s at the Primo Playhouse.

@uglyprimo / Instagram

Let’s show Ugly Primo all our support, hope we meet Ugly Primo in the felt (or flesh, let’s be real) and see what “exclusive merch” he’s drawn up for us.

READ: Ugly Primo Is One Latino Artist Everyone Who Loves Pop Culture Should Know About