Entertainment

These Spanish-Language Albums Changed The Face And Feel Of The Music Industry

Whenever anyone dares to write a list of the most influential albums of all time, there are generally detractors who come up in arms. We do not wish to upset anybody with this selection of amazing albums, though. We just want to show you the depth and breath of the music that has come out of Latin America and out of the Latino diaspora in the United States. It is pretty easy to listen to all of these, so fire up your Spotify, get your headphones on and just let yourself go.

Música maestro.

“Re” by Cafe Tacvba

Year released: 1994

Genre: rock mexicano

Credit: R-4391373-1363636582-9482.jpeg.jpg. Digital image. Discogs

Widely regarded as the best Mexican rock album ever released, this masterpiece has been appreciated by people like Madonna. The album borrows from genres such as danzon and Tex-Mex music and produces indelible sounds that will make you laugh, dance and cry.

“Dónde están los ladrones?” by Shakira

Year released: 1998

Genre: Rock en español

Credit: R-5843968-1439639530-5572.jpeg.jpg Discogs. Digital image.Discogs.

Before she told us that her hips don’t lie and became a world phenomenon, Shakira released this mellow album that revealed her talent as a songwriter. She was young, beautiful and intelligent, a true example of the power of Latina women.

“Siembra” by Willie Colón y Rubén Blades

Year released: 1978

Genre: Salsa

Credit: Siembra-Colón-Blades. Digital image. Revista Replicante

It is not often that true legends collaborate. The New York native Willia and Blades from Panama released this album, which includes the classic “Pedro Navajas,” a true masterpiece that is violent and joyful at once.

“Una década” by Rubén Blades

Year released: 2003

Genre: Salsa

Credit: Una-década-Blades. Digital image. Revista Replicante

This is an amazing collection with Blades’ recordings from the 1990s. What makes him special is the skillful combination of musical skill and social commentary in the poignant lyrics.

“Tijuana Sessions Vol. I” by Nortec Collective

Year released: 2001

Genre: Electronic

Credit: 64. Digital image. Lado B.

This duo from the border city of Tijuana really got what it means to live in a liminal zone that is equally influenced by Anglo and Latino cultures. The result is as enigmatic as, say, Radiohead’s “OK Computer.” A real masterpiece that will make you fly.

“Leche” by Fobia

Year released: 1993

Genre: Latin Rock

Credit: 81. Digital image. Lado B.

The intellectual offspring of the likes of Lou Reed and David Bowie. The front singer Leonardo de Lozane held an enigmatic, androgynous vibe. This album is like a shot of tequila: kitsch, yet punchy. 

“Mucho barato” by Control Machete

Year released: 1997

Genre: Hip Hop

Credit: 41. Digital image. Lado B.

The precursors of hip hop south of the Border. This album was revolutionary: as angry as Rage Against the Machine, yet using Spanglish in newfound ways that touched the vulgar and poetic.

“Chavela Live at Carnegie Hall” by Chavela Vargas

Year released: 2003

Genre: Ranchera

Credit: MI0001307534. Digital image. All Music

Chavela Vargas was a revolutionary on many fronts. She was one of the first openly queer personalities in Latin American music, and she revived her career well into her golden years. This album is a live performance in the legendary Carnegie Hall in New York: it is the stuff legends and dreams are made of.

“Adios Nonino” by Astor Pizzolla

Year released: 1969

Genre: Tango

Credit: 50-latin-albums-46.-astor-piazolla-y-su-quinteto-adios-nonino-1969-billboard-500×500 (1). Digital image. Billboard

After Carlos Gardel, Astor Piazzolla is perhaps the most representative tango musician in history. He revolutionized tango by giving the classic Argentinian and Uruguayan genre a modern twist. His accordion is damn sexy, the stuff that makes the blood and passions pump.

“Buena Vista Social Club” by Ry Cooder, Compay Segundo, Ruben Gonzalez, Eliades Ochoa and Ibrahim Ferrer

Year released: 1997

Genre: Son cubano

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-18.buena-vista-social-club-buena-vista-social-club-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard

This is the soundtrack for Wim Wenders now-legendary film that follows a group of Cuban musicians. The album smells of rum, cigars and sunset at Havana. The album is groundbreaking because it helped Western countries get acquainted with the complexity of Latin music.

“El circo” by La Maldita Vecindad

Year released: 1991

Genre: Urban rock / danzon

Credit: 18. Digital image. Lado B.

One of the great ways in which Latin American culture has pushed back against foreign cultural influence is of course music. This album tells everyday sad, courageous and unbelievable stories from Mexico City. From kids who live in the sewers to a bar where the saddest souls in the city dance, this is a true joya that mixes traditional and modern genres. “Kumbala” is one of the best songs ever written, period.

“Mundo Colombia” by Celso Piña

Year released: 2002

Genre: Cumbia

Credit: 51OKb1oU4CL._SX466_. Digital image. Amazon.

The great Celso is a musician from Monterrey, Mexico, who has nevertheless become one of the leading cumbia musicians. The genre is originally from Colombia, so in this album Celso offers an homage to the ritmos sabrosos of Colombian lands.

“Nada personal” by Soda Stereo

Year released: 1985

Genre: Rock argentino

Credit: 65. Digital image. Lado B.

We could argue that this band led by the late Gustavo Cerati was even better than Anglo groups like Duran Duran. This album is all energy and 1980s vibe. New Wave sounds that are still listed to by Latin American youth.

“Suavemente” by Elvis Crespo

Year released: 1998

Genre: Merengue

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-17.elvis-crespo-suavemente-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard

Suavemente, besame…. we are sure you have listened to this song at a wedding or at unos quince. Crespo brought Merengue to the mainstream and that is something that will never be taken away from him.

“Cielo de tambores” by Grupo Niche

Year released: 1990

Genre: Cumbia/salsa

Credit: R-5071556-1454493188-1038.jpeg. Digital image. Discog.

Perhaps the most influential Colombian album of all time. This album is energetic and sounds like the dark roast of Colombian coffee. Con sangre y con sudor su historia escribio.

“Secretos” by José José

Year released: 1983

Genre: Ballad

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-27.-jose-jose-secretos-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard.

The Mexican Frank Sinatra. This album is the epitome of his estilo llegador: songs like “El Amor Acaba” and “Lagrimas” will play in the late hours of the night while you sip a tequila and think of amores perdidos.

“En cico en la cárcel de Santa Martha” by El Tri

Year released: 1989

Genre: Rock mexicano

Credit: 19. Digital image. Lado B.

Just like Johnny Cash did in Saint Quentin and other prisons, the legendary band El Tri (think of a Mexican version of The Ramones) played for the inmates, creating one of the most lively records in the history of Latin American rock.

“Celia & Johnny” by Celia Cruz and Johnny Pacheco

Year released: 1974

Genre: Salsa

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-14.celia-cruz-celia-johnny-billboard-500×50. Digital image. Billboard

Every legend has a beginning, and this was it for Celia Cruz, the absolute queen of salsa. Azuuuuuuucar!

“Bachata Rosa” by Juan Luis Guerra y sus 4.40

Year released: 1990

Genre: Bachata

Credit: 94756091. Digital image. Toda coleccion.

This Dominican legend took pop music by storm with songs like “Burbujas de amor”. Quisiera ser un pezzzzz.

“Los de atras vienen conmigo” by Calle 13

Year released: 2008

Genre: Raeggeton

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-5.-calle-13-los-de-atras-vienen-conmigo-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard.

Residente and Visitante poured it all in this album, which is fun to listen to, but also contains some very punchy and politically incendiary lyrics.

“La espada y la pared” by Los Tres

Year released: 1995

Genre: Rock chileno

Credit: 56. Digital image. Lado B.

This Chilean band mixes rock, jazz, and cueca, a traditional genre of the indigenous peoples of Chile. This album was one of the first to be produced after Pinochet’s dictatorship and the energy is palpable: a new era of freedom was coming.


READ: Country Music Is Losing Steam As Latin Music Experienced Major Growth In Popularity Last Year

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Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson Says People Always Assumed He Was a Girl Growing Up Because He Had ‘Soft Features’

Entertainment

Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson Says People Always Assumed He Was a Girl Growing Up Because He Had ‘Soft Features’

Dwayne Johnson, agreeably one of the most “masculine” presenting people in the world, recently revealed that people weren’t always so quick to assume he was so. In an interview on “Sunday Today with Willie Geist,” that took place earlier this week the American actor and former professional wrestler revealed that when he was a child, people often assumed he was a girl. 

Speaking about his experience with presumed gender identity, The Rock revealed that people often thought he was girl because of his “soft features.”

“I would say between the ages of 7 and 11, people thought that I was a little girl because I had really soft features and I had really soft Afro hair,” he explained in his interview with Willie Geist.

The actor even went so far as to share a time in his life as a fifth-grader who was riding on a school bus.

“I sit down next to a kid, and within 60 seconds, he goes, ‘Can I ask you something?'” The Rock recalled. “I said, ‘Yeah.’ He goes, ‘Are you a boy or a girl?'”

Drawing on this time in his life, Johnson revealed that likely this also chalks up to his frequent moves as a child.

During his childhood, Johnson’s father Rocky Johnson was a professional wrestler who often moved his family around. According to John, he attended thirteen different schools by the time he was in high school.

“I have had a Forrest Gump-ian childhood growing up,” Johnson explained in his interview. “Wrestling in the ’80s and in the ’70s was way different than it is today. A lot of the times, including my father, the wrestlers would live paycheck to paycheck.”

The former wrestler reflection on earlier days coincides with the recent premiere of the hit NBC sitcom “Young Rock” a new series based on his life.

Fans of Johnson will be glad to know that he also stars in the series.

He is also portrayed by three different actors Adrian Groulx, Bradley Constant and Uli Latukefu.

“Growing up, and you know we specifically went with these timelines in my life that were very defining times at 10 years old, 15 and 18 … there’s a lot of things in between those years that took place … but it was complicated and the relationship that I had with my dad was incredibly complicated — that was fueled by tough love,” he explained during NBC’s TCA press tour in an interview about the series.

He went onto share that his father “was kicked out of his house at 13 and he was homeless, so that then shaped the man who then raised me… And in that complication came an extraordinary life that was full of travel. I lived in 13 different states by the time I was 13 years old, also lived in New Zealand.”

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Yes, Beyoncé Really Did Run Into Selena Quintanilla At A Mall Back In The Day

Entertainment

Yes, Beyoncé Really Did Run Into Selena Quintanilla At A Mall Back In The Day

Part 2 of Netflix’s “Selena: The Series,” is currently streaming, which means fans of the late Tejano singer are getting a chance to learn more about her origin stories. In the second part of the series, fans can expect to see more of the icon’s tragically brief but beautifully successful life. The new episodes chronicle Selena Quintanilla’s rise as a superstar and will no doubt make fans of the singer feel a deep sense of love for her.

Particularly when it comes to one episode in particular!

Part 2’s episode 6, called “Lo Más Bello,” sees the lives of two superstars collide.

The endearing episode sees Selena, played by Christian Serratos, on a shopping trip to an outdoor mall with her mother and sister. It’s then that the young singer catches the eye of a young girl who is also with her mother and sister.

Perhaps it’s real seeing real, but in either case in this episode, the young girl stops to gaze at Selena. She’s star-struck. In the episode, the young girl’s mother asks who she’s looking at and the girl replies, “Selena, a famous singer. Be quiet!”

Knowing that her daughter is a singer herself, the mother encourages her to introduce herself. Of course, the young girl is too shy to say hello but she does wave.

When Selena walks away, the young girl’s mother reveals a fun twist when she says “Beyoncé Knowles, you better learn not to be afraid of people if you ever want to be famous too.”

Like we said…

Real recognizing real.

Selena
“Selena: The Series” / Netflix

While it might seem like the producers took creative liberty, it turns out they actually didn’t. And it makes sense. Fans of Selena and Beyoncé know that the two singers are Texan-icons.

In a recent interview for MTV Trés, Beyoncé revealed that she actually did see Selena, in the Galleria Mall in Houston. “I didn’t say much to Selena because I wasn’t a celebrity,” Beyoncé said in an interview for MTV Trés back in the day. “I just saw her and said hello and kept it moving. Definitely growing up in Texas I heard her on the radio, and I think listening to her album, even though I didn’t know exactly what she was saying, it helped me in the studio with my pronunciation.”

Fans of the Texan starlets might also remember how Beyonce, in a 2007 interview with People en Español, spoke about her love of Selena.

At the time, Beyoncée was celebrating her re-release of six Spanish-language tracks. “I listened to Selena all the time” she recalled at the time of the interview. “She’s close to me because of where I’m from.”

Both “Selena: The Series” Parts 1 and 2 are streaming right now on Netflix! Check them out!

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