Entertainment

These Spanish-Language Albums Changed The Face And Feel Of The Music Industry

Whenever anyone dares to write a list of the most influential albums of all time, there are generally detractors who come up in arms. We do not wish to upset anybody with this selection of amazing albums, though. We just want to show you the depth and breath of the music that has come out of Latin America and out of the Latino diaspora in the United States. It is pretty easy to listen to all of these, so fire up your Spotify, get your headphones on and just let yourself go.

Música maestro.

“Re” by Cafe Tacvba

Year released: 1994

Genre: rock mexicano

Credit: R-4391373-1363636582-9482.jpeg.jpg. Digital image. Discogs

Widely regarded as the best Mexican rock album ever released, this masterpiece has been appreciated by people like Madonna. The album borrows from genres such as danzon and Tex-Mex music and produces indelible sounds that will make you laugh, dance and cry.

“Dónde están los ladrones?” by Shakira

Year released: 1998

Genre: Rock en español

Credit: R-5843968-1439639530-5572.jpeg.jpg Discogs. Digital image.Discogs.

Before she told us that her hips don’t lie and became a world phenomenon, Shakira released this mellow album that revealed her talent as a songwriter. She was young, beautiful and intelligent, a true example of the power of Latina women.

“Siembra” by Willie Colón y Rubén Blades

Year released: 1978

Genre: Salsa

Credit: Siembra-Colón-Blades. Digital image. Revista Replicante

It is not often that true legends collaborate. The New York native Willia and Blades from Panama released this album, which includes the classic “Pedro Navajas,” a true masterpiece that is violent and joyful at once.

“Una década” by Rubén Blades

Year released: 2003

Genre: Salsa

Credit: Una-década-Blades. Digital image. Revista Replicante

This is an amazing collection with Blades’ recordings from the 1990s. What makes him special is the skillful combination of musical skill and social commentary in the poignant lyrics.

“Tijuana Sessions Vol. I” by Nortec Collective

Year released: 2001

Genre: Electronic

Credit: 64. Digital image. Lado B.

This duo from the border city of Tijuana really got what it means to live in a liminal zone that is equally influenced by Anglo and Latino cultures. The result is as enigmatic as, say, Radiohead’s “OK Computer.” A real masterpiece that will make you fly.

“Leche” by Fobia

Year released: 1993

Genre: Latin Rock

Credit: 81. Digital image. Lado B.

The intellectual offspring of the likes of Lou Reed and David Bowie. The front singer Leonardo de Lozane held an enigmatic, androgynous vibe. This album is like a shot of tequila: kitsch, yet punchy. 

“Mucho barato” by Control Machete

Year released: 1997

Genre: Hip Hop

Credit: 41. Digital image. Lado B.

The precursors of hip hop south of the Border. This album was revolutionary: as angry as Rage Against the Machine, yet using Spanglish in newfound ways that touched the vulgar and poetic.

“Chavela Live at Carnegie Hall” by Chavela Vargas

Year released: 2003

Genre: Ranchera

Credit: MI0001307534. Digital image. All Music

Chavela Vargas was a revolutionary on many fronts. She was one of the first openly queer personalities in Latin American music, and she revived her career well into her golden years. This album is a live performance in the legendary Carnegie Hall in New York: it is the stuff legends and dreams are made of.

“Adios Nonino” by Astor Pizzolla

Year released: 1969

Genre: Tango

Credit: 50-latin-albums-46.-astor-piazolla-y-su-quinteto-adios-nonino-1969-billboard-500×500 (1). Digital image. Billboard

After Carlos Gardel, Astor Piazzolla is perhaps the most representative tango musician in history. He revolutionized tango by giving the classic Argentinian and Uruguayan genre a modern twist. His accordion is damn sexy, the stuff that makes the blood and passions pump.

“Buena Vista Social Club” by Ry Cooder, Compay Segundo, Ruben Gonzalez, Eliades Ochoa and Ibrahim Ferrer

Year released: 1997

Genre: Son cubano

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-18.buena-vista-social-club-buena-vista-social-club-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard

This is the soundtrack for Wim Wenders now-legendary film that follows a group of Cuban musicians. The album smells of rum, cigars and sunset at Havana. The album is groundbreaking because it helped Western countries get acquainted with the complexity of Latin music.

“El circo” by La Maldita Vecindad

Year released: 1991

Genre: Urban rock / danzon

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One of the great ways in which Latin American culture has pushed back against foreign cultural influence is of course music. This album tells everyday sad, courageous and unbelievable stories from Mexico City. From kids who live in the sewers to a bar where the saddest souls in the city dance, this is a true joya that mixes traditional and modern genres. “Kumbala” is one of the best songs ever written, period.

“Mundo Colombia” by Celso Piña

Year released: 2002

Genre: Cumbia

Credit: 51OKb1oU4CL._SX466_. Digital image. Amazon.

The great Celso is a musician from Monterrey, Mexico, who has nevertheless become one of the leading cumbia musicians. The genre is originally from Colombia, so in this album Celso offers an homage to the ritmos sabrosos of Colombian lands.

“Nada personal” by Soda Stereo

Year released: 1985

Genre: Rock argentino

Credit: 65. Digital image. Lado B.

We could argue that this band led by the late Gustavo Cerati was even better than Anglo groups like Duran Duran. This album is all energy and 1980s vibe. New Wave sounds that are still listed to by Latin American youth.

“Suavemente” by Elvis Crespo

Year released: 1998

Genre: Merengue

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-17.elvis-crespo-suavemente-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard

Suavemente, besame…. we are sure you have listened to this song at a wedding or at unos quince. Crespo brought Merengue to the mainstream and that is something that will never be taken away from him.

“Cielo de tambores” by Grupo Niche

Year released: 1990

Genre: Cumbia/salsa

Credit: R-5071556-1454493188-1038.jpeg. Digital image. Discog.

Perhaps the most influential Colombian album of all time. This album is energetic and sounds like the dark roast of Colombian coffee. Con sangre y con sudor su historia escribio.

“Secretos” by José José

Year released: 1983

Genre: Ballad

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-27.-jose-jose-secretos-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard.

The Mexican Frank Sinatra. This album is the epitome of his estilo llegador: songs like “El Amor Acaba” and “Lagrimas” will play in the late hours of the night while you sip a tequila and think of amores perdidos.

“En cico en la cárcel de Santa Martha” by El Tri

Year released: 1989

Genre: Rock mexicano

Credit: 19. Digital image. Lado B.

Just like Johnny Cash did in Saint Quentin and other prisons, the legendary band El Tri (think of a Mexican version of The Ramones) played for the inmates, creating one of the most lively records in the history of Latin American rock.

“Celia & Johnny” by Celia Cruz and Johnny Pacheco

Year released: 1974

Genre: Salsa

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-14.celia-cruz-celia-johnny-billboard-500×50. Digital image. Billboard

Every legend has a beginning, and this was it for Celia Cruz, the absolute queen of salsa. Azuuuuuuucar!

“Bachata Rosa” by Juan Luis Guerra y sus 4.40

Year released: 1990

Genre: Bachata

Credit: 94756091. Digital image. Toda coleccion.

This Dominican legend took pop music by storm with songs like “Burbujas de amor”. Quisiera ser un pezzzzz.

“Los de atras vienen conmigo” by Calle 13

Year released: 2008

Genre: Raeggeton

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-5.-calle-13-los-de-atras-vienen-conmigo-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard.

Residente and Visitante poured it all in this album, which is fun to listen to, but also contains some very punchy and politically incendiary lyrics.

“La espada y la pared” by Los Tres

Year released: 1995

Genre: Rock chileno

Credit: 56. Digital image. Lado B.

This Chilean band mixes rock, jazz, and cueca, a traditional genre of the indigenous peoples of Chile. This album was one of the first to be produced after Pinochet’s dictatorship and the energy is palpable: a new era of freedom was coming.


READ: Country Music Is Losing Steam As Latin Music Experienced Major Growth In Popularity Last Year

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This Man Is Using TikTok To Bring Younger People To Old-School Jams And His Fans Are Loving It

Entertainment

This Man Is Using TikTok To Bring Younger People To Old-School Jams And His Fans Are Loving It

@Doggface208 / TikTok

Everyone has that embarrassing uncle. The one who busts out dancing in public, or makes incredibly old-school dad jokes. Embarrassing uncles keep you guessing what they’ll do next and oftentimes you and your cousins are embarrassed by his bizarre behavior. If you can’t think of an embarrassing uncle, chances are it’s you, you’re the embarrassing uncle or tía. This Mexican man from Wyoming is the quintessential embarrassing uncle, except the internet, unlike your cousins, is loving every minute of his antics. 

Tío TikTok might be a little older than the app’s intended audience, but he still managed to make his content go viral, even when he didn’t even know what TikTok was.

Credit: @Doggface208 / TikTok

Tío TikTok aka Nathan Apodaca is the grown man who’s single-handedly bringing Gen-Z app TikTok, to Millennials. If you’re wondering what TikTok is, don’t worry. It is basically the second-coming of Vine. It is all about short videos that play in a loop for everyone to enjoy. 

Remember Musical.ly? Maybe you remember the times of Vine? It’s hard to keep up with the constantly changing social media landscape as some apps gain notoriety, others merge, and even more die out. As non-members of the Gen Z generation, it’s even harder to keep it all straight.

The old app Musical.ly was rebranded as TikTok and it’s quickly become Gen Z’s app of choice.

If you do remember Musical.ly, you may know that in August 2018, it rebranded as TikTok. And Vine? That app was the victim of an ever-changing internet and suffered a slow death, causing users to feel the dejection of media abandonment. TikTok though has stirred up a revival of short video clips. Only now, it’s even more interactive, collaborative, and downright addictive.

Apodaca was introduced to the app by his Gen Z daughters, and his videos soon went viral.

Tío TikTok was unaware of the popular video-app himself. His daughters, Makyla and Angelia, are the ones who first introduced Apocada’s to the platform. His youngest daughter even helped him film his first video, which quickly went viral. Apodaca confesses that he was stumped as to what to do, or what type of content to publish on his app, but his eldest daughter came to the rescue and suggested he did his usual goofy dances on camera. And just like that, Apodaca turned into a TikTok sensation.

Tío TikTok’s 16-second videos are simple and hilarious, and they touch a chord with young audiences for their humor.

Credit: @Doggface208 / TikTok

Apodaca shares 16-second bite-sized clips of himself dancing and performing to a tune. His perfectly in-sync interpretations, have gained him nearly 90 thousand followers. Tío TikTok usually jams out to classic ’90s gangsta rap like DMX, Dr. Dre, Eminem or Twista and Gen Z-ers and Millennials alike, can’t seem to get enough of his nostalgic vibes.

In his video’s he’s usually goofing around at work or high off weed which has made his content recognizable.

In one of his most liked posts, Nathan is seen sitting on a conveyor belt lip-syncing Sublime’s ’90s classic hit ‘Santeria’ at the factory where he works and films most of his videos. The post earned 26.9 thousand likes and received thousands of hilarious comments like “*OSHA has entered the chat*” by @BertoBitch or “The workers that package for WISH…”

Apodaca is the stoner uncle you never knew you needed on social media.

His hashtags regularly include 420, 710, ‘high’ and ‘gogreen’, stoner terms used to celebrate dabs and cannabis concentrates. His song choices, usually pulled from an unpredictably random selection, often celebrate the plant too. @Doggface208 aka Nathan Apodaca loves weed so much that he, ingeniously, linked his PayPal account on his TikTok bio for donations; “Now accepting donations 4 Flower 🍃 n white Ts PayPal apodacadogg208@gmail.com” reads his profile description. Whether the account is real or not, we’re not sure, but you’re welcome to send a little donation and let us know.

Most TikTok users may be under 30 according to Apple Store download stats, but we’re sure that this guy’s hilarious videos will attract an older demographic to download the app too.

READ: This 11-Year-Old Latina Has Thousands Of Followers On TikTok And The Most Hilarious Sense Of Humor About Latinidad

Ranchero Star ‘Paquita La Del Barrio’ Was Hospitalized Due To Pulmonary Complications

Entertainment

Ranchero Star ‘Paquita La Del Barrio’ Was Hospitalized Due To Pulmonary Complications

We still haven’t recovered from the passing of ‘El príncipe de la canción’ José José and we’re already being hit with more bad news. After much speculation on social media, it has been confirmed that the controversial and iconic singer Paquita La del Barrio was hospitalized this week for pneumonia and pulmonary thrombosis. 

Paquita La del Barrio changed the genre of Bolero music forever with her salty man-hating lyrics and ‘borrachera’ worthy songs.

credit Instagram @paquitaofficialb

In her over 50 years of creating music, ‘La Guerrillera del Bolero’, Paquita la del Barrio has gifted us with endless beautifully shady catchphrases to use on shitty exes; “Rata de dos patas”, “Cucaracha del infierno” and “¿Me estas oyendo inútil?” to name a few. Her man-hating words changed Bolero music for women and will be sung in tequila-induced ‘borracheras’ until the end of time. Paquita’s controversial, and sometimes salty lyrics have earned her a few enemies, to say the least, but the truth is that Paquita La del Barrio shattered glass ceilings in the genre of Ranchero, a world of male-dominated, misogynistic music, just by speaking her mind through music.

The feminist ranchera canceled a show for the first time in her career, due to health complications.

Francisca Viveros Barradas a self-proclaimed warrior against ‘machismo’ culture, canceled a show scheduled for this Saturday in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, due to health complications. Francisco Torres, her manager —also known as Paquito— said in a public statement for the press, that Paquita had complained of ongoing chest pains which eventually landed her at Hospital Angeles Lindavista in Mexico City. “Siempre te imaginas lo peor,” he said. It was later discovered that the pain was caused by a pulmonary embolism and pneumonia. The 72-year-old singer was checked into intensive care for a 24-hour watch.

Torres confirmed that Paquita’s health first raised concerns on October 8,  “She started with discomfort, her blood pressure, she said her chest hurt. That night the situation worsened, she couldn’t stand, she complained about chest pain, and the first thing that came to mind was ‘her heart’. A doctor came,  prescribed medication and administered her a sedative, we thought she’d be better by morning. But she wasn’t.”

The singer’s health is now improving and she’s no longer in ICU.

Credit Instagram @paquitaoficialb

‘Paquito’ went on to describe how the star’s health continued to deteriorate; “The next day she still had chest and back pain,” he said, “we decided to call an ambulance and take her to the emergency room.” Paquita La del Barrio’s manager explained that doctors diagnosed the singer with pulmonary damage due to the varying weather conditions the 72-year-old had been exposed to during her tour of the United States. “We know that weather conditions in the U.S. are more extreme, that was added to her condition, she resisted until her lungs collapsed,” Torres confirmed that Paquita la del Barrio was in ICU on October 10 but is now stable and her health is improving. It seems like the singer is recuperating just fine, but will still need time to heal, which is why she was forced to cancel the concert scheduled for this weekend. 

‘La Guerrillera del Bolero’ has sung against machismo for over forty years, and although she’s received a lot of criticism, her words have resonated with audiences worldwide.

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Way ahead of her time, Paquita has fought machismo singing from the stage for more than four decades. At 72, the feminist ranchera has released 33 albums which have been classified by the genre as “duros contra ellos” for her harsh words against men. Amongst her many shade-throwing songs are “Tres veces te engañé”, “Las mujeres mandan”, “Viejo raboverde”, “Hombres malvados” and many more. Her most famous hit “Rata de dos patas”, which has become somewhat of a hymn against men, was the song that sky-rocketed Paquita to fame. After this song went public, she went from singing at bars in the popular Mexico City neighborhood ‘Guerrero’, and moved on to perform on stages internationally.

Paquita’s life has been far from easy, and her story has been turned into a bio-series by Imagen Televisión.

credit Instagram @paquitaoficialb

Paquita is an idol for many Latino women who were touched by her words. But her life wasn’t always so glamorous. The singer’s life has already been immortalized in a bio-series broadcasted by Imagen Televisión. Through the series, we found out that she married a 42-year-old man when she was just fifteen. She had two children with him only to find out that the ‘rata de dos patas’ had been cheating on him all along and had another family in a different town. Her love life has clearly not been as successful as her career —which is true of a lot of women in many different industries. The singer, however, is now an artist consolidated as one of the most famous feminist performers Mexico has ever seen.