Entertainment

Selena Gomez Announces New Netflix Series ‘Living Undocumented’

Selena Gomez continues her reign as a Netflix producer with Living Undocumented. It is always great when celebrities use their platforms to enrich and educate. Gomez has a huge platform and can generate huge numbers. 13 Reasons Why blew Netflix’s expectations out of the water, and I can’t help but think it’s because of Gomez’s enormous Instagram following. The girl has reach. 

As you might have guessed, Living Undocumented is a documentary series that follows the lives of undocumented immigrants as they navigate life under the looming threat of increasingly cruel immigration policies and ICE raids.

Selena Gomez announces Living Undocumented on Instagram

“I am so humbled to be a part of Netflix’s documentary series Living Undocumented. The immigration issue is more complex than one administration, one law or the story you hear about on the news. These are real people in your community, your neighbors, your friends—they are all part of the country we call home. I can’t wait for you guys to see this and hope it impacts you like it impacted me. Available globally October 2,” Gomez wrote.

Living Undocumented 

Living Undocumented will focus on eight undocumented families. Premiering on October 2nd on Netflix, the show will chronicle the families as they face possible deportation. The narratives will range from hopeful to infuriating, but the series will put a human face on a dehumanized group of people. 

It cannot be said again that the United States has always struggled with two contradictory narratives: the one where it is a beacon of hope for the tired, hungry, and poor, versus the one where it has upheld numerous racist and xenophobic immigration policies. This is an issue that predates Trumpito, even if he has kicked it into it’s most degrading form. 

“I chose to produce this series, Living Undocumented because, over the past few years, the word ‘immigrant’ has seemingly become a negative word,” said Gomez. “My hope is that the series can shed light on what it’s like to live in this country as an undocumented immigrant firsthand, from the courageous people who have chosen to share their stories.”

Gomez is joined by executive producers Eli Holzman, Aaron Saidman, Mandy Teefey, Anna Chai, and Sean O’Grady. Chai will also co-direct the series.

“Living Undocumented is designed to illuminate one of the most important issues of our time. But rather than discussing this issue with only statistics and policy debates, we wanted viewers to hear directly from the immigrants themselves, in their own words, with all the power and emotion that these stories reflect.”

Humanizing immigrants is key

People don’t just bring guns into Walmarts to kill 22 innocent humans beings for no reason. It is no secret that President Trump’s dehumanizing language was a catalyst for the El Paso shooting. The suspect whose name shall not be invoked told officers he was looking to kill “Mexicans.” Mexicans — the Latinxs Trump referred to as rapists and criminals. The mass murderer also said he wanted to stop a “Hispanic Invasion,” in his manifesto. Trump called Central Americans “invaders.” 

According to Pew Research Center, this year they found that 58 percent of Latinx adults say they experienced discrimination because of their race or ethnicity. Across all races and ethnic groups, two-thirds of individuals surveyed say that expressing racist views has become more common since Trump was elected. 

This year, at a Trump rally, supporters were cheering about shooting immigrants. 

“How do you stop these people?” Trump asks. Then someone yelled back, “Shoot them.” Trump smiled. The crowd cheered. Three months later, the El Paso shooting took 22 lives.

“The language that criminalizes and makes Latinos out to be evil is affecting our own citizens and it’s going to have both short- and long-term consequences that we are starting to see in the Latino population,” Elizabeth Vaquera, an associate professor at George Washington University who studies vulnerable groups, told the Washington Post.

A Bipartisan Non-Issue Becomes A Partisan Issue

This immigration “issue” started off as a hoax but through Trump’s horrible policies he created this new immigration crisis. In 2017, when Trump took office, migrants arrested at the border were at the lowest level in three decades. 

Three former employees of U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security wrote in Politico, the border crisis is all Trump’s fault.

 “It is Donald Trump himself who is responsible. Through misguided policies, political stunts and a failure of leadership, the president has created the conditions that allowed the asylum problem at the border to explode into a crisis.” 

Public Religion Research Institute survey found that 80 percent of Democrats view the fact that the majority of the United States will be nonwhite by 2045 as a good thing, while 61 percent of Republicans say it is bad. 

The barrage of harmful rhetoric has turned what was not even a problem into a national crisis with opinions straddling partisan lines, and a heightened hatred of Latinx people. Living Undocumented might be exactly what this country needs. 

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Here’s What We Know So Far About The ‘Rebelde’ Reboot Coming To Netflix

Entertainment

Here’s What We Know So Far About The ‘Rebelde’ Reboot Coming To Netflix

Nostalgia has a way of taking us right back to who we were when we saw and heard some of our favorite things. “Rebelde” is definitely one of the top nostalgic moments in most Latino childhoods. Well, get ready because Netflix is bringing “Rebelde” back so you can dive back into the stories that will forever hold a special place in your heart.

“Rebelde” is coming back and this is definitely not a drill.

After years of being off the air, the historic and iconic show “Rebelde” is back and people cannot wait. The original cast has been good at keeping our love for them alive as they toured and created music. Most recently, RBD, the surviving band of original Rebelde members, dropped a new single to make the pandemic a little more tolerable.

We already know who is reprising their role in the reboot.

Celina Ferrer, played by Estefanía Villarreal, is coming back as the principal of the school. The official announcement letter was signed by the Elite Way School alumna.

“EWS is renowned for the excellence of its illustrious student body, young people ready to dazzle the world. In these halls, we have shaped icons who have gone on to entertain millions with their talent, and our classrooms have turned students into stars, ready for the big stage,” reads the letter. “Today, our Board of Directors is proud to present the next generation of young people who will become part of our prestigious institution in the upcoming 2022 school year. We welcome our future students Azul Guatia, Sergio Mayer Mori, Andrea Chaparro, Jeronimo Cantillo, Franco Masini, Lixeth Selene, Alejandro Puente, and Giovanna Grigio, who have been selected from an impressive list of applicants. The new students will start wearing the EWS uniform during orientation, which will start on March 1 of this year, thus preparing themselves for the upcoming 2022 school year at this institution, always committed to educating the leaders of tomorrow.”

Here’s a quick look at the new class.

Azul Guaita

Guaita is best known for her impressive TikTok account. She also starred in telenovelas ‘Mi marrido tiene familia” and “Soltero con hijas.” The 19-year-old Mexican actress has garnered more than 2 million followers on TikTok.

Sergio Mayer Mori

Mayer Mori is son of Mexican actor and producer Sergio Mayer and Uruguayan-born Mexican actress, model, producer and writer Bárbara Mori Ochoa. The young actor was in “Un padre no tan padre” in 2016.

Andrea Chaparro

Andrea is the daughter of famed Mexican actor Omar Chapparo. Hopefully the actress brings her unapologetic grunge vibes to the set in her role.

Jeronimo Cantillo

Cantillo is best known for his role in Verdad Oculta and Los Morales as well as his reggaeton music. The actor is bringing his award nominated acting chops and musical stylings to the highly anticipated Netflix reboot.

Franco Masini

Masini is one of the biggest names attached to the new “Rebelde” reboot. With several projects under his belt and more than 1 million Instagram followers, Masini is definitely bringing a large following to the Netflix show.

Lizeth Selene

Selene has made a name for herself as a musician and model. It is pretty impressive that her first acting job is going to be as part of the newest Rebelde class.

Alejandro Puente

Puente is an actor, writer, and director with a lot of success in Mexico. He is best known for his role as Todd Anderson in the Mexican stage adaptation of “Dead Poets Society.” He also stars in “El Club,” a crime drama television show in Mexico.

Giovanna Grigio

Grigio comes to the Elite Way School with 6 million Instagram followers and a lot of experience. The Brazilian actress has starred in several television shows and movies and will definitely bring some strong talent to the show.

READ: RBD Is Back With A New Single And This Is Not A Drill

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All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Entertainment

All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Netflix continues to churn out powerful films in countries around the world and their latest venture, a look into the life of Brazilian footballer Pelé is another hit. Sure, Pelé may be considered the world’s best soccer player ever but his place in Brazilian history is less clear – at least according to the new doc.

Filmmakers David Tryhorn and Ben Nicholas spent hours in Pelé’s company interviewing him on everything from a childhood spent in poverty to his numerous affairs and his controversial relationship with the authoritarian regime that ruled Brazil during his playing career. Here are some of the key takeaways from this must watch documentary.

Pelé was criticized for not taking a political stance during Brazil’s authoritarian regime.

In 1964, the Brazilian military staged a coup, which led to a dictatorship being established in the country that lasted until 1985. The military government relied on torture and repression to maintain power.

In the film, Pelé is asked whether he knew about these practices at the time.

“If I were to say now that I had never been aware of it, that would be a lie,” he says. “There was a lot we never got to find out, but there were many stories too.”

However, the film paints him as taking a neutral stance throughout, never criticising the regime. Former team-mate Paulo Cezar Lima – aka Caju – doesn’t forgive him.

“I love Pele but that won’t stop me criticizing him. I thought his behavior was that of a black man who says ‘yes sir’,” said Caju. “A submissive black man. It’s a criticism I hold against him until this day, because just one statement from Pelé would have gone a long way.”

The government may have interfered with the Brazilian team.

A dejected Pele leaves the field at Goodison Park after being beaten 3-1 by Portugal, 1966.

The film paints a picture of how national team’s exploits were used to launder the reputation of the military regime during the 1960s. Before the 1970 World Cup, a journalist and friend of Pelé’s describes how it became very important for the regime’s international image that Brazil win the World Cup again. And that meant Pele had to play.

“Winning the World Cup became a governmental matter,” Kfouri says. “The team staff were almost entirely made up of military personnel.”

Manager Joao Saldanha appears to have been fired in the lead-up to the 1970 World Cup for criticizing the Brazilian president, telling a reporter: “I don’t pick his ministers and he doesn’t pick my team. That way we understand each other well.”

Pelé wanted to quit after the 1966 World Cup.

Credit: Pelé / Netflix

In the 1966 World Cup, Brazil was considered a favorite to win, having won the competition four years earlier in Chile. However, there was a massive shock when they were knocked out in the group stages.

“Getting knocked out of the World Cup in England was the saddest moment of my life,” Pelé says. In the film, he tells a reporter: “I don’t intend to play in any more World Cups, because I’m not lucky in them. This is the second World Cup where I have been injured after only two games.”

He played one more World Cup – the 1970 tournament in Mexico, which Brazil won. He’s still the only player to have won three World Cup trophies.

And he admits it was hard for him to stay faithful.

Stores of Pelé’s alleged infidelities and wild romances were common in the tabloids. By 1958, he was a global icon and football’s first millionaire while still only a teenager. And his fans followed him everywhere so it’s hardly a secret that Pelé did not show the same faithfulness to everyone in his life as he did to his club Santos.

At one point in the film, a journalist asks Pelé whether he found it difficult to remain faithful with the amount of women flirting with him.

“In all honesty, it was,” he says, “I’ve had a few affairs, some of which resulted in children, but I only learned about them later. My first wife knew all about it, I never lied to anyone.”

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