Entertainment

Vogue México Put A Spanish Music Artist On Their Cover And Called Her Latina And Latinos Almost Set Twitter On Fire

It seems the difference between “Latinx” and “Hispanic” continues to confuse the masses where both terms are incorrectly used interchangeably to describe the collective Spanish speaking community. This time the controversy comes with the reveal of Spanish flamenco artist Rosalía on the cover of Vogue México, as the face for their list of  “20 artistas latinos.”

If you were alive over the weekend, then you likely caught the Twitter backlash that criticized Vogue for its latest faux pas.

For its latest cover, Vogue México recently featured Rosalía for an issue that headlined a group of “20 artistas latinos.

Rosalía, again, is not Latino. The artist was born in Catalonia, Spain and while she has collaborated with Latino artists like J Balvin, she is– again– not Latino. Vogue’s cultural flub is a reminder that as much of a rising influence as Latino artistry and culture continues to be, the nuances of our culture and history remain in the blindspots of many consumers. And yes, even of Vogue México’s, a media giant, that has made great strides to improve the diversity on its pages in recent years, particularly with features of minority women like Mexican indigenous actress Yalitza Aparicio. 

Latinx Twitter was quickly ablaze with comments reminding people of the correct usage: “Latinx” is for Latin America, “Hispanic” is reserved for those from Spain. 

But beyond the literal distinctions, the term “Hispanic” is loaded with ties to colonial history between Latin America and Spain. Starting in the 1500s, what was then known as “New Spain” (colonized areas including Latin America) led to the massacres of indigenous communities or forced assimilation to Spanish culture. Additionally, diseases wiped out a large portion of the population leading to mortality rates as high as 90 percent throughout Latin America.   

In short, despite the fact that Rosalía speaks Spanish, calling her Latina is culturally insensitive and grossly inaccurate.

Rosalía herself discussed the difference during an interview with Fader in May 2019 saying “If Latin music is music made in Spanish, then my music is part of Latin music. But I do know that if I say I’m a Latina artist, that’s not correct, is it?” The singer, who makes music inspired by Andalusian flamenco culture, clarified that she’s “part of a generation that’s making music in Spanish” and suggested that others should decide if she should be included in a modern definition of what “Latin” music sounds like.

In the interview, she addressed how the term is used loosely in the media though the article does mention the controversy she sparked after saying she felt “Latina” when she traveled to places like Mexico. 

Since the Vogue México cover is in Spanish it can be translated to “Latin Artists” referring to Spanish music overall.

However, due to the sensitive nature of the terminology, it’s important to take the opportunity to highlight the importance of the distinction. 

This isn’t the first instance in entertainment where the distinction needed to be made. Recently, One Day at a Time creator Gloria Calderón Kellett tweeted about how she needed to clarify that the writer she’d been sent was Hispanic not Latinx

She then tweeted a chart created by Bustle to provide a visual interpretation of the differences between “Latinx” and “Hispanic.” 

The music industry as a whole has yet to adopt this vocabulary and properly use it and the uproar is not on the spotlight placed on Rosalía but rather the fact that there are plenty of indie Latinx artists who deserve attention. 

Rosalía is a five-time Latin Grammy nominee who came out with El Mal Querer in November of last year.  She spoke with Billboard about the Andulasian influence in her neighborhood growing up that sparked her love for flamenco since the folkloric music has its origins in that community in Southern Spain. 

“That folklore is part of who I am, and that’s the key: I don’t want to lose my roots. I think that’s what gives you your identity. Rather than trying to adhere to some kind of global pop standard, it’s much more interesting to look to my roots and to the popular music of where I’m from. Not now or ever will I put flamenco aside,” she told the publication. 

Though her last album was an ode to flamenco, she has explored other more contemporary sounds and collaborated with Latinx artists include J Balvin, who is from Colombia. Their reggaeton track was a global hit providing an opportunity for a distinction to be made between the way they could’ve been identified but that wasn’t necessarily the case. 

Even well known Spanish artists like Enrique Iglesias and Alejandro Sanz are often referred to as Latino/Latinx artists. Yet, even the U.S. census has been identifying people of Spanish descent using “Hispanic” as a catchall term since 1980. In neither instance was the word used properly and the vocabulary continues to evolve now that the gender-inclusive term Latinx has become the preferred identifier for younger generations. 

While Rosalía’s music is worthy of attention and praise, it’s important to note that, like Portugal and Brazil, Spain and Spanish-speaking countries in Latin America are two distinct cultures that shouldn’t be conflated. If English artists and Americans can be identified as such and not grouped together solely based on language, it’s not much to ask that distinctions be made when it comes to “Latinx” versus “Hispanic.” 

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Billboard’s Latin Music Week Starts Tomorrow And These Are The ‘Can’t Miss’ Events You Can Join For Free

Entertainment

Billboard’s Latin Music Week Starts Tomorrow And These Are The ‘Can’t Miss’ Events You Can Join For Free

Kevin Winter / Getty Images

Billboard’s annual Latin Music Week has finally arrived and this year is extra special since it’s the 30th anniversary of the annual event. Not to mention the entire lineup of events – from concerts to Q&As – has gone virtual, making it easier than ever for you and me to join in.

Already the event schedule looks incredible, including a live Q&A with Jennifer Lopez and Maluma about Latin musics path to Hollywood.

So if you’re finding yourself bored at home (as so many of us continue social distancing) this is the perfect roundup of events to keep us entertained.

Billboard’s Latin Music Week starts today and it promises to be a one stop shop for music fans.

With all of us being cooped up at home still, this year’s Billboard Latin Music Week is hotly anticipated. The four-day immersive experience officially starts today (Tuesday, October 20) and will be dedicated to Latin music, culture, and entertainment.

And this yer is extra special because Billboard is celebrating it’s 30th birthday for the annual event, making it the longest running and biggest Latin music industry event. And this year for the first time ever it will be completely virtual, meaning you can easily join in on the intimate artist conversations, industry panels, workshops, and performances.

According to Leila Cobo, a VP at Billboard, “Latin music has become a formidable and undeniable uniting force around the world, so it’s fitting that this year’s virtual Latin Music Week will be globally accessible at no cost to the industry and fans for the first time. She added that “Our virtual event will allow us to connect with fans and artists from all over the world no matter where they are. During these very difficult times, we are thrilled to extend an invitation to all who wish to celebrate Latin music and culture.”

The week will be full of immersive events and online concerts that you won’t want to miss.

For the first time in its 30 years of existence, Billboard Latin Music Week will take place virtually, from Oct. 20-23, meaning that you can easily join in on all the events.

So far, Billboard has confirmed a long list of panels, performances, workshops and Q&As – including one with Jennifer Lopez and Maluma. And performances by Pharrel Williams, Anuel AA, Ozuna, J Balvin, Maluma, Becky G, Los Tigres Del Norte, and many others. You can get a look at the full lineup of events here.

The craziest/best part – it’s completely free! But you have to RSVP so make sure you sign up for your spot here.

This year’s events coincide with this year’s Billboard Latin Music Awards broadcasting live on Oct. 21 via Telemundo, with awards to be given out in 59 categories honoring the top artists, songs, albums, labels, publishers, songwriters, and producers of the year.

It’s hard to believe but Billboard is celebrating 30 years of Latin Music Week and looking back on stars before they were megastars.

Since this year marks the 30th anniversary of Latin Music Week, Billboard is taking a look back – way back. The music entertainment giant has put together a playlist of video interviews with stars before they became global sensations.

For example, Maluma’s interview from 2015 just as he was beginning to get mainstream recognition. OMG…that baby face!

Bad Bunny also has an old interview on the site from 2017 (ok…not that long ago) and he looks so different and even sounds so different. It’s so cool to look back on these artists and spot the differences.

Billboard has even put together the ultimate playlist to help commemorate the special week!

Featuring hits from all of this year’s top Billboard Latin Music Award contenders, this playlist is pure fire and will definitely hype you up – which is much needed since we’re all still staying at home amid this major spike in Coronavirus cases.

Remember, the events start today and you can get the full schedule and RSVP here.

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Zariah And Ugly Primo Want To Make Sure That You Get Out There And Vote For Our Community

Things That Matter

Zariah And Ugly Primo Want To Make Sure That You Get Out There And Vote For Our Community

Weiden + Kennedy / YouTube

There is a lot at stake in the upcoming elections. Organizations representing so many communities have come forward to fight for civil rights. Artists are also getting involved to make sure that their fans and and communities get out the vote and make the world the way they want to see it.

Zairah and Ugly Primo teamed up to tell their fans to get out and vote.

“Mueve El Pom Pom” is an anthem to all of the people out there who need to be mobilized to go vote. Ugly Primo and Zairah teamed up to create a visual piece of art that highlights the importance of getting out the vote in a very important election.

The animated music video makes the case for the need to get out the vote. Zairah and Ugly Primo highlight the crises facing the American public from affordable healthcare to an immigration system that needs to be reformed to the Trump administration’s continued attacks on public education.

The video is really pushing for people to get their pom poms to the polls.

Images of protest signs we have seen throughout Trump’s administration make an appearance. Black Lives Matter and pro-women signs appear in both English and Spanish to highlight the need for all communities to come together.

The visuals, done by the one and only Ugly Primo, drive home the importance of our community voting as a bloc to create the kind of society we want to live in. It is also encouraging people to go out and vote and to vote any way that they can.

The video is calling on the Latino community to come together and vote to save our democracy.

There is a lot of concern about the fate of democracy in the U.S. The Trump administration has bulldozed over political norms and made comments contrary to our democracy. The latest example of President Trump threatening American democracy is him saying he isn’t sure if he will accept the results of the election. This simple and peaceful transition of power is what democracies are built on. President Trump has not signaled that he will be willing to peacefully accept the election results.

READ: Voting Rights Activists Are Sounding The Alarm Of Latin Voter Suppression In Texas

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