Entertainment

Vogue México Put A Spanish Music Artist On Their Cover And Called Her Latina And Latinos Almost Set Twitter On Fire

It seems the difference between “Latinx” and “Hispanic” continues to confuse the masses where both terms are incorrectly used interchangeably to describe the collective Spanish speaking community. This time the controversy comes with the reveal of Spanish flamenco artist Rosalía on the cover of Vogue México, as the face for their list of  “20 artistas latinos.”

If you were alive over the weekend, then you likely caught the Twitter backlash that criticized Vogue for its latest faux pas.

For its latest cover, Vogue México recently featured Rosalía for an issue that headlined a group of “20 artistas latinos.

Rosalía, again, is not Latino. The artist was born in Catalonia, Spain and while she has collaborated with Latino artists like J Balvin, she is– again– not Latino. Vogue’s cultural flub is a reminder that as much of a rising influence as Latino artistry and culture continues to be, the nuances of our culture and history remain in the blindspots of many consumers. And yes, even of Vogue México’s, a media giant, that has made great strides to improve the diversity on its pages in recent years, particularly with features of minority women like Mexican indigenous actress Yalitza Aparicio. 

Latinx Twitter was quickly ablaze with comments reminding people of the correct usage: “Latinx” is for Latin America, “Hispanic” is reserved for those from Spain. 

But beyond the literal distinctions, the term “Hispanic” is loaded with ties to colonial history between Latin America and Spain. Starting in the 1500s, what was then known as “New Spain” (colonized areas including Latin America) led to the massacres of indigenous communities or forced assimilation to Spanish culture. Additionally, diseases wiped out a large portion of the population leading to mortality rates as high as 90 percent throughout Latin America.   

In short, despite the fact that Rosalía speaks Spanish, calling her Latina is culturally insensitive and grossly inaccurate.

Rosalía herself discussed the difference during an interview with Fader in May 2019 saying “If Latin music is music made in Spanish, then my music is part of Latin music. But I do know that if I say I’m a Latina artist, that’s not correct, is it?” The singer, who makes music inspired by Andalusian flamenco culture, clarified that she’s “part of a generation that’s making music in Spanish” and suggested that others should decide if she should be included in a modern definition of what “Latin” music sounds like.

In the interview, she addressed how the term is used loosely in the media though the article does mention the controversy she sparked after saying she felt “Latina” when she traveled to places like Mexico. 

Since the Vogue México cover is in Spanish it can be translated to “Latin Artists” referring to Spanish music overall.

However, due to the sensitive nature of the terminology, it’s important to take the opportunity to highlight the importance of the distinction. 

This isn’t the first instance in entertainment where the distinction needed to be made. Recently, One Day at a Time creator Gloria Calderón Kellett tweeted about how she needed to clarify that the writer she’d been sent was Hispanic not Latinx

She then tweeted a chart created by Bustle to provide a visual interpretation of the differences between “Latinx” and “Hispanic.” 

The music industry as a whole has yet to adopt this vocabulary and properly use it and the uproar is not on the spotlight placed on Rosalía but rather the fact that there are plenty of indie Latinx artists who deserve attention. 

Rosalía is a five-time Latin Grammy nominee who came out with El Mal Querer in November of last year.  She spoke with Billboard about the Andulasian influence in her neighborhood growing up that sparked her love for flamenco since the folkloric music has its origins in that community in Southern Spain. 

“That folklore is part of who I am, and that’s the key: I don’t want to lose my roots. I think that’s what gives you your identity. Rather than trying to adhere to some kind of global pop standard, it’s much more interesting to look to my roots and to the popular music of where I’m from. Not now or ever will I put flamenco aside,” she told the publication. 

Though her last album was an ode to flamenco, she has explored other more contemporary sounds and collaborated with Latinx artists include J Balvin, who is from Colombia. Their reggaeton track was a global hit providing an opportunity for a distinction to be made between the way they could’ve been identified but that wasn’t necessarily the case. 

Even well known Spanish artists like Enrique Iglesias and Alejandro Sanz are often referred to as Latino/Latinx artists. Yet, even the U.S. census has been identifying people of Spanish descent using “Hispanic” as a catchall term since 1980. In neither instance was the word used properly and the vocabulary continues to evolve now that the gender-inclusive term Latinx has become the preferred identifier for younger generations. 

While Rosalía’s music is worthy of attention and praise, it’s important to note that, like Portugal and Brazil, Spain and Spanish-speaking countries in Latin America are two distinct cultures that shouldn’t be conflated. If English artists and Americans can be identified as such and not grouped together solely based on language, it’s not much to ask that distinctions be made when it comes to “Latinx” versus “Hispanic.” 

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This Video Of A Woman Doing ASL To Cardi B’s ‘WAP’ Is Too Lit

Fierce

This Video Of A Woman Doing ASL To Cardi B’s ‘WAP’ Is Too Lit

@Freelove19xx/ Twitter

Just when you thought the hype around Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion’s “WAP” might be trickling down, a recent video of a deaf woman translating the lyrics has gone viral.

After dropping her big track collaboration with Megan Thee Stallion, Dominican/Trinidadian rapper Cardi B has had just about everybody repeating the beloved lines of the song over and over again. But the most important rendition of the big hit is one done by a woman who does ASL and performs to “WAP” like a boss.

The now-viral clip is beyond entertaining and inspiring to watch. Mostly because the woman in the video not only has the MOVES she also has the lyrics on lock.

A 25-year old TikTok and Twitter user by the name of Raven Sutton went viral for her recent “WAP” ASL cover.

Known on the social platforms as @Freelove19xx, she went viral over the weekend after she recorded herself passionately repeating the lyrics to “WAP” in ASL while channeling the slick and sexy vibe of the Cardi B x Megan Thee Stallion hit. In the video, the TikTok user can be seen interpreting each line of the WAP lyrics while expertly swaying her hips and bopping to the music.

In the comments, users questioned how @Freelove19xx was able to keep up with the rhythm of the music without hearing, she revealed that she has a “speaker that vibrates my whole house lmao. I can feel the music.”

Speaking to Fierce by mitú Sutton explained “What I loved most about the WAP song is that Cardi B and Megan are both successful women that aren’t afraid to speak their truth. They do not let other people’s expectations define them.”

Sutton who was born deaf after the deaf gene was passed down to her by her father told us that ASL is her native language and that she hopes her video shows nondeaf people that deaf people can do just as much as they can. “It’s a common assumption that Deaf people can’t do certain things because we can’t hear. Things like talking, dancing, listening to music etc,” she explained. “Truth is, us Deaf people enjoy the same things as everyone else. We ask to be included and accommodated so that the things we enjoy do not become a burden. Examples of accommodations are providing ASL interpreters, caption your videos, and learn ASL. Accessibility is important. Let’s all put in the work together.”

Sutton shared that people can learn basic ASL tools at Gallaudet University.

Sutton says that since post her video she’s noticed that “people are recognizing that there are a lot of Deaf Talent and creators out there. People are wanting to learn ASL. This is a great thing and I hope the recognition and fire energy continues.”

Users inspired by the tweet were quick to celebrate @Freelove19xx for her post.

“A lot of times the variations of a sign are used for a song’s chorus so that it doesn’t seem too repetitive or redundant. It’s a wholeass art, as a hearing person that knows ASL, it’s amazing to see EVERY DAMN TIME lol,” one user commented.

“I absolutely love this. I’ve taken deaf studies & ASL classes & trying to learn 1 sign a week since then. hopefully, I can be signing like u someday!” another user pointed out. “Its hard w no one to practice w but i hope to gain more friends in the deaf community to help me w that. Anyway, you did amazing!”

“Ahhhhh I have no words!!” an adoring commenter replied. “This is grounds for a marriage proposal.”

Thanks to the clip, fans are already demanding the obvious:

“Has anyone started a petition asking Cardi to have Bluejay in her next video yet?” one user asked.

As of this publication, @Freelove19xx has yet to respond to mitú’s request for comment.

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This TikTok Hack Shows A Pretty Cool Way To Grow Your Own Avocados At Home

Fierce

This TikTok Hack Shows A Pretty Cool Way To Grow Your Own Avocados At Home

@BradCanning/ TikTok

As the pandemic continues to carry us into the infinite unknown the only thing that we can be certain of is that keeping ourselves entertained, busy, and happy is essential. Of course, any plant lover knows that one of the most simple pleasures in life is having some homegrown vegetables in the kitchen. If you’re quarantining and doing all that you can to avoid public spaces like grocery stores this truth goes double.

Recently, a TikTok user uploaded a quick tutorial on how to make your very own avocado plant using supplies you probably have around the house as well as that avocado seed you most definitely toss out way too often. We broke down the steps for you below and they’re pretty easy!

Check them out below.

Here’s what you’ll need

  • Avocado seed
  • Water 
  • Paper towels
  • Ziploc bags
  • A vase or glass

1. Once you’ve cut the avocado hold on to the seed

@BradCanning/ TikTok

As TikTok user @BradCanning points out save the seed! As you’re preparing your avocado for a feast, be sure to avoid cutting into the seed.

2. Remove the outer layer of the seed by peeling it off

@BradCanning/ TikTok

Run the seed underwater then dry it. Once it’s dried up, peel off the skin with your fingers to make sure the seed doesn’t go moldy.

3. Allow the seed to sprout and grow a root by wrapping it in a paper towel and putting it in a Ziplock bag

@BradCanning/ TikTok

After the seed has been in the bag for two to three weeks, it’s time to pull it out and crack it open.

4. Fill a jar with water and suspend the seed

@BradCanning/ TikTok

According to Canning’s TikTok “Put the root in water and it will start to sprout … be careful though, this is a total addiction.”

Make sure to place only the roots or half of the seed in water. To do this, Canning used a vase with an opening that fits around the diameter of the seed. Note: others often insert wooden pegs into the seed to suspend it above the water. The root will slowly grow into the water below which means you’ve got a healthy growing plant on your hands.

5. Once the plant gets to a good size pot it in soil.

@BradCanning/ TikTok

Once the plant gets to a good size you can pot it in soil or in a bigger vase to ensure that it keeps growing. According to SF Gate, “After that, the plant takes 10 to 15 years to grow large enough to fruit, which it only does in suitable growing conditions. In U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 through 12, it’s safe to grow avocado plants outside. In colder zones, they make attractive houseplants but are unlikely to bear fruit.”

For the full video check it out here.

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