Entertainment

Rita Moreno, Gina Torres And Laurie Hernandez Will Be Co-Grand Marshals At The 2020 Tournament of Roses

It might only be October but our eyes are already focused on a big event in 2020. That’s when the famous Tournament of Roses the traditional New Year’s Day Celebration that includes the Rose Parade and Rose Bowl Game in Pasadena, California— will be held once again. However, we’re already looking forward to next year’s celebration, because of the iconic women who will act as grand marshals for the 130th anniversary of the event.

Last week, it was announced that the Tournament of Roses will be co-marshaled by actresses Rita Moreno and Gina Torres, and gymnast Laurie Hernandez.

credit Instagram @rose_parade

This year’s theme is “The Power of Hope” and it’s that sentiment that resonated with gold medalist Hernandez when she expressed what it means to see a trio of Latinas given this honor.

“That is the representation that I have always wanted to see as a little kid and now you have three generations of it,” the Olympian told ABC 7 in an interview following the announcement.

Hernandez was one of the “Fierce Five” who represented team USA to gold at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. The Puerto Rican athlete is also an individual silver medalist. Since her time at the Olympic games, the Boricua has written two books, appeared on “Dancing With The Stars” and was a judge on “American Ninja Warrior Junior.”

Torres expressed her happiness at the validation of her Latina-ness that came with this announcement.

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“At this point in my career, to actually be acknowledged as a Latina woman, having not been able to be that for a great part of my career, for me is an incredibly emotional experience,” the actress shared with ABC 7.

In her statement, Gina Torres is referring to the unfortunate fact that Afro-Latinx people are often excluded from Latinidad because of their Blackness. Colorism and anti-Black racism is unfortunately not uncommon in the Latinx community. As an afro-Cubana, it would not be surprising that Torres experienced this herself. Hollywood would have also seen her as only Black, erasing her Latina identity as well.

Torres also recalled growing up in the Bronx with her mother, and how she loved watching the Puerto Rican Day Parade together. One experience in particular stuck out to her.

“My mom just stopped cold and then suddenly, at the top of her lungs, I heard her say: ‘Que viva Puerto Rico!’ and I said, ‘Mami, but we’re Cuban,’ and (my mom) said, ‘Not today! We’re all the same!’”

The actress is best known for her role in “Suits” and the series’ new 2019 spin-off, “Pearson.” She’s also appeared in critically acclaimed series such as “Westworld,” “Claws” and “Hannibal.” In addition, Torres is a noted voice actor for numerous video game titles.

For EGOT winner Rita Moreno, the honor of being announced named co-marshal is a culmination of a life-long love of the event.

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“It’s something I’ve watched on television all of my life, and that I would be asked to be one of the grand marshals for this extraordinary Rose Parade, I’m thrilled,” Moreno explained to ABC 7 at the event.

The 87 year-old Puerto Rican came out dancing after the announcement was made. In true Moreno fashion, she also requested that the event’s DJ play a “Latino song” so every one could dance together to celebrate the upcoming Tournament of Roses. The DJ played Marc Anthony’s “Vivir Mi Vida.”

The actress is best known for her Oscar-award winning role in “West Side Story” and her EGOT status but she has recently won fans over in her role of Lydia in “One Day At A Time.” Of course, Moreno has been dazzling audiences on film, stage and TV for decades so an appearance at the Tournament of Roses should be a piece of cake.

The announcement of the three Latina co-marshals comes the same year as the Tournament of Roses’ appointed its first Latina president.

credit Instagram @rose_parade

Farber worked with the Tournament of Roses for over 25 years before she became the event’s president. An immigrant from Argentina, she came to the United States as a child. Farber and her husband, Tomas Lopez, ⁠— who is an immigrant from the Dominican Republic ⁠— chose the theme for this year’s parade. During the grand marshal ceremony, she explained the meaning behind the “Power of Hope” theme.

“Our families came here because this country represented a beacon of hope. Hope of freedom of expression, of association, of speech, of education, and of economic opportunities.”

She also shared the news about the tournament’s theme with The Pasadena Star-News“At a time when the country and the world is most divided, our celebration and our parade will bring everyone together.”

The event will also feature bands from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and El Salvador, making it for a very Latinx experience. The Tournament of Roses will take place January 1, 2020.

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‘Vintage Latinas’ Is Hyping Up WOC Entertainers Often Forgotten By Media

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‘Vintage Latinas’ Is Hyping Up WOC Entertainers Often Forgotten By Media

Amid a life-threatening pandemic, political upheaval and a dawning economic crisis, the future can feel frighteningly uncertain. We’ve all been coping in our own ways: from practicing meditation to trying out new recipes to starting creative projects. For me, joy has come in the form of history. Learning about women, particularly Latinas, who entertained audiences on the silver screen or at cabarets, fought for their countries and communities, and created beauty and fashion trends has brought me bliss at a time when I couldn’t even imagine happiness as a possibility. Realizing how healing the stories of our foremothers have been for me, I decided to create Vintage Latinas, an Instagram account dedicated to the Latina and Latin American women and femmes of yesterday.

Through the online community, I post daily photos and videos of women from the 1900s up until the early 2000s. I accompany each image with a lengthy caption that either introduces followers to former stars they’ve never heard of or shares little-known facts and stories about popular icons. Highlighting women and femmes across Latin America, the Spanish Caribbean and the U.S., the page is sprinkled with popular faces like Celia Cruz, Rita Moreno, Frida Kahlo and Bianca Jagger as well as radiant figures who aren’t as celebrated in popular media today like María Montez, Rosa Luna, Maribel Arrieta and Ajita Wilson. My goal is to commemorate the beauty, style, talent, brilliance and power of these women. To do so, I spotlight everyone from actresses, singers, dancers, models and showgirls to artists, designers, beauty queens, party czars, activists and trendsetters. 

It’s not surprising to me that at a time when I have limited control over the unpredictable future I decided to turn my attention to the past. A lover of history, I often find refuge in the narratives of people from yesterday who fought against powerful people, systems and countries to create change for their communities. This was no different. After losing my job in March and being locked up in quarantine for the months that followed, my mental and spiritual health took hard blows. While addressing the issues I was experiencing and developing a wellness routine, I decided to delve into literature about Julia de Burgos, Lolita Lebrón, Blanca Canales, Iris Morales and Denise Oliver-Velez — some of the Puerto Rican nationalists and revolutionaries I hold dear to my heart.

But unlike my experiences in the past, while rereading these works I began imagining the periods in which these women lived — the early- and mid-twentieth century — outside the political and social battles they were fighting.

Immediately, I found myself researching artists and actresses my heroines might have listened to and admired, expanding my interest in these eras beyond struggle and protests.

Soon, guarachas and boleros from artists like Myrta Silva, Carmen Delia Dipini, Lucecita Benitez and Toña la Negra were booming from my speakers more than my favorite reggaetoneros. I was spending my weekends happy that I was forced to stay home because that gave me the chance to search and watch Old Hollywood classics. Obsessed with the makeup and style of the women I was watching, I started repurposing the clothes in my closet to look like outfits inspired by some of my ‘60s and ‘70s fashion inspirations, like Lola Falana, Raquel Welch and Tina Aumont.

I was balancing news of a scary future with the stories and aesthetics of erstwhile powerful Latinas who resisted, lived and loved during similarly turbulent times.

When I started Vintage Latinas a month ago, I simply wanted to create a space where I could honor all the women who were positively influencing my life. For me, it was a hobby, something fun and joyful to do between freelance writing gigs and trying to land a full-time job amid a pandemic. But within days, the page grew into something more. Very quickly, people began following Vintage Latinas, commenting on the posts and sharing the content with their audiences. They even encouraged others to follow the page and called it their favorite account on Instagram. I knew that the dynamic personalities and enduring influence of these sensational women were as healing — or at least as captivating — to others as they were to me. By week one, the page went from a personal hobby to a creative project and online community where people from all over the world are remembering and discovering our Latina and Latin American heroines. 

As I embark on Vintage Latinas’ second month, I have several exciting plans I will begin executing. In addition to my daily posts about historic stars, I’ll be utilizing original and user-generated content to create a browsing experience I hope will excite followers. I’ll be creating activities, like trivia-style quizzes, polls and “Finish the Lyrics” games, featuring vintage images of the everyday matriarchs of the community and conducting interviews through Instagram Live with historians and modern-day Latinas who dress in vintage and pinup, among several other undertakings.

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Puerto Rican singer and politician Ruth Fernández is considered one of the most powerful women and barrier-breakers in Puerto Rican history. Born in Ponce, Puerto Rico in 1919, Fernández began singing publicly as a teenager, performing at age 14 on local radio stations for 50 cents a day. Heard by Mingo, a famous bandleader, she was invited to join the group in 1940, becoming the first woman to sing in a Puerto Rican orchestra. Performing in nightclubs, dances and casinos, Fernández became a star on the archipelago. However, celebrity didn't save her from experiencing anti-blackness. In 1944 when her band was contracted to perform at the Condado Vanderbilt Hotel for a benefit concert for the American Red Cross, she was told she had to enter the building through the kitchen door because of the color of her skin. But on the day of the show, Fernández ignored the racist protocol and entered through the main entrance. When asked years later about that night, she responded: "Me llamaron negra. ¿Negra? ¿Y qué?" From then on, she began referring to herself as "La Negra de Ponce." In 1972, Fernández was elected to Puerto Rico's Senate, representing the district of Ponce as a member of the Partido Popular Democrático de Puerto Rico until 1980. As a legislator, she sought reforms and better working conditions for artists and also considered the needs of Puerto Ricans living in the contiguous U.S. In her honor, a tenement in the Bronx — the Ruth Fernández Apartments — is named after her. Fernández has received awards from several countries in Latin America, while many cities in the U.S. — including Washington, D.C., New York and Los Angeles — have official "Ruth Fernández Days." She passed away in 2012 of a septic shock and pneumonia at the age of 92. Here she performs "Soy la que soy" in the 1960s. #ruthfernandez #puertorican #1960s #latinasdeayer #vintagelatina #vintage #vintagestyle #vintagefashion #vintagebeauty #retrostyle #blackbeauty #blackvintage

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The stories of our foremothers, who thrived or continued luchando despite racist systems, colonialism and state-instituted violence, are inspiring and must be preserved. Through Vintage Latinas, I aim to ensure their vibrant lives and contributions to culture and social justice aren’t forgotten. Instead, I want our barrier-breaking predecessors to be celebrated, and I hope you’ll join me in this digital rave that is equal parts history, culture, glam and community. 

Follow Vintage Latinas on Instagram.

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We Finally Have Our First Look At The Animated ‘One Day At A Time’ Episode We’ve Waited For

Entertainment

We Finally Have Our First Look At The Animated ‘One Day At A Time’ Episode We’ve Waited For

Courtesy of Sony Pictures

Everyone has been waiting for the animated “One Day At A Time” episode and we finally have our first look. Safe to say that we all really like what we see.

The show is staying true to their political form.

The coronavirus has changed everything, even Hollywood. Production was suspended when the rest of California went into lockdown. This means that shows cant record new episodes and movies are being delayed.

It is, however, a good time for animation. Since people have to be physically distanced to stop the spread of the deadly virus, some shows are eyeing animation. “One Day At A Time” embraced the idea early on and announced an animated episode to keep fans happy.

The sneak peek of the show is about talking to family about politics.

Latinos, like all other ethnicities, are not a monolith. Different experiences have shaped each person to believe what they believe and vote the way they vote. Latino families often include people across the political spectrum and it is always hard to get on the same page.

ODAAT fans are here for this kind of authentic visibility into a Latino family. We all have lived with the family divided between Republicans and Democrats. A lot of it has to do with where people live and who they are around. However, Cubans and Cuban-Americans are by and large Republicans. However, younger Cuban-Americans are more like to be a Democrat than older Cubans and Cuban-Americans, they are still predominately Republican.

Whatever the subject matter is, we are just so excited to continue to enjoy more ODAAT.

We are just days away from finally seeing the latest Alvarez adventure and we can’t wait. This is one show that does it right.

READ: ‘One Day At A Time’ Is Doing A Special Animated Episode After Production Shutdown Due To Coronavirus

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