Entertainment

Netflix Is Bringing Us An Anime Series Based In Fictional Mexico And We Are Here For It

Probably one of the worst feelings in the world is sitting down for a good night of Netflix and chill, with or without company, and realizing you have no idea what to watch. You start scrolling, and all you can seem to find on the menu is stuff that you don’t wanna watch. It’s agonizing. Well, it’s time to get excited, babes, because there’s a new show gracing your screens that you definitely don’t wanna miss: Seis Manos.

Okay, you’ve got me interested. But what’s this Seis Manos about?

Instagram / @adrianfromssf

Set in the 1970s, this animated television series takes place in the fictional Mexican town of San Simon, and follows the story of three orphans who seek to get revenge for the death of their mentor. Each orphan was trained in a different tradition of Chinese martial arts, and use their fighting skills to exact their own form of justice. Before you ask – yes, the show’s creators have done their research, so the fighting styles depicted in Seis Manos are legit. Just … don’t go trying them at home.

The show, which features quite a bit of violence, follows in the grindhouse tradition.

Instagram / @cinespectaculo

While our heroes are facing their own set of trials and tribulations, the San Simon police and the DEA are working in the background, trying to take down a formidable drug lord in the area. Naturally, both the authorities and the Seis Manos find themselves on the same trail. From there – well, you’ll just have to watch the show to find out what happens! A warning, though: it is pretty violent, since Seis Manos follows in the grindhouse tradition.

We know you’re dying to tell us about the geeky, behind-the-scenes, stuff. 

Instagram / @ionexhibits

The cool thing about Seis Manos is the fact that, while Netflix has been growing its collection of Japanese anime over the past little while, it’s yet to really delve into other animation. Seis Manos is part of filling that gap – and it’s doing so while shining a spotlight on the creative talents of people of color. The show, which has been developed in partnership with Viz Media, is being produced entirely in-house by Austin-based Powerhouse Animation Studios. 

And best of all, we don’t have to wait much longer for the show’s debut!

Instagram / @yoinvitoelcine

Even though production for the show has been in the works for a while, Seis Manos was only officially confirmed in May 2018, after Powerhouse saw success with their adaptation of Castlevania for Netflix. However, we’ll be seeing Seis Manos on our screens real soon: its release is marked for fall 2019. And we only have three weeks left of summer!

Do we know any of the voice actors in Seis Manos?

Instagram / @fclasangelicasbr

In short: hell yes! Mike Colter, the deep-voiced heartthrob behind Marvel’s Luke Cage, is set to play DEA agent Brister alongside Angelica Vale, who voices the local cop Garcia. While there are three central protagonists in the orphaned martial artist practitioners, only two are voiced. According to the footage promoting Seis Manos, Silencio, the orphan who specializes in the “white eyebrow” style, doesn’t speak. And so, Aislinn Derbez voices Isabella, an orphan who specializes in the Saholin hung ga style, while Jonny Cruz provides the talent for Jesus, the orphan known for his drunken boxing fighting style.

Yup, our beloved Danny Trejo is playing the ultimate villain – El Balde.

Instagram / @mangaforeverofficial

Our fave Danny Trejo was brought on board to be the voice behind the bad guy, the violent drug lord El Balde. You’d know him best for his roles in Spy Kids, as Machete, and as the drug lord Tortuga, in Breaking Bad. While he’s obviously drawing from his ability to play menacing villains and antiheroes for Seis Manos, it’s gonna be hard for Trejo to keep up the tough act after he literally saved a baby from a car crash only a few days ago. 

In summary: consider your viewing for fall sorted, babes. At least for one binge-session, that is. If you’re keen on finding out more about Seis Manos, have a watch of the trailer here. Or, if you’ve already seen the trailer already, let us know your thoughts about Seis Manos on our Facebook page – you can find us through the icon at the top of the page

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Another International Brand Has Been Accused Of Copying Indigenous Mexican Designs

Entertainment

Another International Brand Has Been Accused Of Copying Indigenous Mexican Designs

DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP via Getty Images

Although it comes as no surprise, it’s still as frustrating as ever that an international fashion brand has ripped off traditional designs of Indigenous cultures. This time, it’s an Australian label that appears to have copied the designs of Mexico’s Mazatec community.

Although the company has already pulled the allegedly copied dress, the damage appears to have been done as many are rightfully outraged at their blatant plagiarism.

Australia’s Zimmermann brand has been accused of copying designs from Mexico’s Indigenous community.

Mazatec people from the Mexican state of Oaxaca have expressed their outrage over yet another attack on their traditions. They claim that an Australian company – Zimmermann – has copied a Mazatec huipil design to make its own tunic dress. The dress, which was part of the company’s 2021 Resort collection and retailed for USD $850, has since been pulled from the company’s website due to the criticism.

Zimmermann is an Australian fashion house that has stores across the U.S., England, France, and Italy. While the huipil is a loose-fitting tunic commonly worn by both Indigenous and non-Indigenous women across Mexico.

It’s hard to argue that the brand didn’t deliberately copy the Oaxacan design.

Credit: Francoise CAVAZZANA/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

When you look at the Zimmermann tunic dress alongside a traditional huipil, it’s hard not to see the resemblance. The cut of the Zimmermann dress, the birds and flowers embroidered on it and its colors all resemble a traditional Mazatec huipil. 

Changes made to the original design – the Zimmermann dress sits above the knees and unlike a huipil is not intended to be worn with pants or a skirt – are disrespectful of the Mazatac culture and world view.

The Oaxaca Institute of Crafts also condemned Zimmermann and called on the brand to clarify the origin of its design.

For their part, Zimmermann has pulled the dress and issued an apology.

Zimmermann subsequently issued a statement on social media, acknowledging that the tunic dress was inspired by huipiles from Oaxaca

“Zimmermann acknowledges that the paneled tunic dress from our current Swim collection was inspired by what we now understand to be a traditional garment from the Oaxaca region in Mexico,” it said.

“We apologize for the usage without appropriate credit to the cultural owners of this form of dress and for the offense this has caused. Although the error was unintentional, when it was brought to our attention today, the item was immediately withdrawn from all Zimmermann stores and our website. We have taken steps to ensure this does not happen again in future.”

However, it’s far from the first time that an international brand has profited off of Indigenous designs.

Unfortunately, international fashion companies ripping off traditional garments and designs – especially those of Indigenous cultures – is far too common. Several major companies have been accused of plagiarism within the last year.

In fact, the problem has become so widespread that Mexico created a government task force to help find and denounce similar plagiarism in the future. Among the other designers/brands that have been denounced for the practice are Isabel Marant, Carolina Herrera, Mango and Pippa Holt.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

A New ‘Coco’ Short Film Called ‘A Day in the Life of the Dead’ Has Just Premiered on Disney+

Entertainment

A New ‘Coco’ Short Film Called ‘A Day in the Life of the Dead’ Has Just Premiered on Disney+

Photo via Pixar/Twitter

We have exciting news for die-hard fans of the beloved Pixar movie, “Coco”. Disney+ has just premiered an adorable short film that gives audiences a glimpse into the “average day in the afterlife” in the Land of the Dead.

The 2-minute film is called “A Day in the Life of the Dead” and features various calacas going about the daily lives.

The short film is part of a series called “Pixar Popcorn” that started streaming on Friday. The series will feature a variety of short films inspired by different Pixar movies, including “Toy Story”, “Finding Nemo,” “The Incredibles”, and of course (and most importantly)…”Coco”.

“A Day in the Life of the Dead” is as beautifully animated as the 2017 film is.

The 2-minute film is animated with the same lush, vibrant colors of the original film and rendered with Pixar’s signature creative vision of the Land of the Dead.

And to make things more exciting, the movie is littered with cameos from fan-favorite characters like Mamá Imelda, Héctor, and the jaw-dropping arrivals agent.

In fact, one of the funniest vignettes is when the arrivals agent repeatedly loses his jaw bone, including when he tries to take an (unsuccessful) bite of cortadillo.

In other parts of the short film, we watch calacas riding a tandem bike, exercising, playing with cute animals, and attempting to keep their heads on straight–literally.

But of course, most of the humor of the short film comes from the inherent comedy of skeletons try to accomplish daily tasks when their bodies keep falling apart.

But “A Day in the Life of the Dead” isn’t the only Pixar short film that’s part of the “Pixar Popcorn” series. There’s tons of cute shorts that will keep you or the little kid in your life entertained for a while.

The series also features the short films “Dancing With the Cars”, “Soul of the City”, “Chore Day: The Incredibles Way”, “Dory Finding”, and “To Fitness and Beyond”, and more. There are eleven short films all together–the perfect amount to binge in one sitting!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com