Entertainment

Netflix Is Bringing Us An Anime Series Based In Fictional Mexico And We Are Here For It

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Probably one of the worst feelings in the world is sitting down for a good night of Netflix and chill, with or without company, and realizing you have no idea what to watch. You start scrolling, and all you can seem to find on the menu is stuff that you don’t wanna watch. It’s agonizing. Well, it’s time to get excited, babes, because there’s a new show gracing your screens that you definitely don’t wanna miss: Seis Manos.

Okay, you’ve got me interested. But what’s this Seis Manos about?

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Set in the 1970s, this animated television series takes place in the fictional Mexican town of San Simon, and follows the story of three orphans who seek to get revenge for the death of their mentor. Each orphan was trained in a different tradition of Chinese martial arts, and use their fighting skills to exact their own form of justice. Before you ask – yes, the show’s creators have done their research, so the fighting styles depicted in Seis Manos are legit. Just … don’t go trying them at home.

The show, which features quite a bit of violence, follows in the grindhouse tradition.

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While our heroes are facing their own set of trials and tribulations, the San Simon police and the DEA are working in the background, trying to take down a formidable drug lord in the area. Naturally, both the authorities and the Seis Manos find themselves on the same trail. From there – well, you’ll just have to watch the show to find out what happens! A warning, though: it is pretty violent, since Seis Manos follows in the grindhouse tradition.

We know you’re dying to tell us about the geeky, behind-the-scenes, stuff. 

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The cool thing about Seis Manos is the fact that, while Netflix has been growing its collection of Japanese anime over the past little while, it’s yet to really delve into other animation. Seis Manos is part of filling that gap – and it’s doing so while shining a spotlight on the creative talents of people of color. The show, which has been developed in partnership with Viz Media, is being produced entirely in-house by Austin-based Powerhouse Animation Studios. 

And best of all, we don’t have to wait much longer for the show’s debut!

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Even though production for the show has been in the works for a while, Seis Manos was only officially confirmed in May 2018, after Powerhouse saw success with their adaptation of Castlevania for Netflix. However, we’ll be seeing Seis Manos on our screens real soon: its release is marked for fall 2019. And we only have three weeks left of summer!

Do we know any of the voice actors in Seis Manos?

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In short: hell yes! Mike Colter, the deep-voiced heartthrob behind Marvel’s Luke Cage, is set to play DEA agent Brister alongside Angelica Vale, who voices the local cop Garcia. While there are three central protagonists in the orphaned martial artist practitioners, only two are voiced. According to the footage promoting Seis Manos, Silencio, the orphan who specializes in the “white eyebrow” style, doesn’t speak. And so, Aislinn Derbez voices Isabella, an orphan who specializes in the Saholin hung ga style, while Jonny Cruz provides the talent for Jesus, the orphan known for his drunken boxing fighting style.

Yup, our beloved Danny Trejo is playing the ultimate villain – El Balde.

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Our fave Danny Trejo was brought on board to be the voice behind the bad guy, the violent drug lord El Balde. You’d know him best for his roles in Spy Kids, as Machete, and as the drug lord Tortuga, in Breaking Bad. While he’s obviously drawing from his ability to play menacing villains and antiheroes for Seis Manos, it’s gonna be hard for Trejo to keep up the tough act after he literally saved a baby from a car crash only a few days ago. 

In summary: consider your viewing for fall sorted, babes. At least for one binge-session, that is. If you’re keen on finding out more about Seis Manos, have a watch of the trailer here. Or, if you’ve already seen the trailer already, let us know your thoughts about Seis Manos on our Facebook page – you can find us through the icon at the top of the page

Mexico And The World Mourn The Loss Of Celso Piña, One Of Mexico’s Greatest Musicians

Entertainment

Mexico And The World Mourn The Loss Of Celso Piña, One Of Mexico’s Greatest Musicians

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If there’s one instrument that best describes Mexican music is has to be the accordion. While the musical key instrument known as a squeezebox has its origins in Europe, it indeed came alive in Mexico as the staple sound in rancheras and cumbias. There is only one musician who thrived through the accordion sound, though sadly that is now a thing of the past.

Celso Piña, known as the “The Accordion Rebel,” died yesterday at the age of 66.

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The Mexican musician was in his hometown of Monterrey, Mexico, and was soon scheduled to g on tour, but had a heart attack and died at the hospital.

La Tuna Group, Piña’s record label, confirmed in a statement that he died yesterday at 12:38 p.m. after suffering a heart attack.

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“Today is a sad day for La Tuna Group,” they stated, “Our deepest condolences to his family, friends, and followers. We are left with an intense emptiness, but he leaves us his great legacy forever. We appreciate respecting the privacy of the family.”

Piña seemed to have been in good spirits earlier in the day and tweeted for the final time. “No one can resist the cumbia,” he said.

The self-taught musician had been touring off and on for months. He also had upcoming shows in Georgia and Texas.

The Grammy-award winning musician had a musical career that spanned 40 decades, and aside from his musical stylings as an accordion player, he was also a composer, singer, and arranger.

Credit: Instagram/@patanegra_mx

Piña had collaborated with several contemporary artists including Lila Downs, Julieta Venegas, Cafe Tacvba, and Gloria Trevi, Variety reports. He was also more than a cumbia musician. His sound also fused into other musical genres, including norteña music, hip-hop, ska, reggae, and more.

Several celebrity fans and collaborators tweeted their heartfelt condolences.

According to the Grammy Academy, Piña got his hands on his first accordion in 1980. He taught himself how to play and performed with his brothers. “Together, they went on to play norteña and tropical music, eventually adding cumbia to their style,” the Academy states. “The brothers became known as ‘Celso Piña Y Su Ronda Bogotá,’ giving a nod to cumbia’s motherland.”

Fans on social media also expressed how much Piña meant to them.

One fan, @iphadra, tweeted, “his greatness of # CelsoPiña is not due to its successes or fame in the 5 continents. It is because it was he who came to claim the music of the marginalized.” @JJ4rmCh tweeted, Rest In Peace Celso Piña, no one fucked it up on an accordion like u did.” But this tweet we could totally relate to from @jennjenn1_  who tweeted, “It wasn’t a real quince or wedding until you played some #CelsoPiña ❤️🇲🇽 🎶🎶🎶 may his music live on for generations to come.”

Writer Melissa del Bosque had the honor of being able to interview him. She tweeted, “Hearing ‘Barrio Bravo’ for the first time was a life-changing experience. Celso Piña and Toy Hernández, of Control Machete, had created a whole new hybrid mixing Colombian cumbia with the anarchy of urban streets. I went directly to Monterrey to interview El Rebelde del Acordeón. Here we are at Cafe Brasil, one of his favorite haunts. As I wrote then, when ‘Cumbia Sobre el Rio hit the airwaves there wasn’t a car from Chicago to Chiapas that didn’t have the bass booming and the sonic onslaught layered with accordion rattling their windows.’ #RipCelsoPina.”

Last year, Piña visited one of his biggest fans, who is also an accordion player just like him. The two performed in the streets of Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Herrera recalled what it was like hearing that his musical idol had died. The young musician told El Universal that he was with his daughter when he heard the news that Piña had died. He said he couldn’t believe it, and all the memories from his incredible visit with him last year rushed back to him. He said it was a dream to have been able to perform with him. 

Here’s a couple of his most beloved and hit songs.

Here’s “Cumbia Sobre el Rio Suena” live and with an orchestra! He had such a distinct voice and sound. There was no one else like him.

“No Sea Conmigo”

This was his collaboration with Cafe Tacvba. So lovely! We dare you not to dance to this one.

What’s your favorite Celso Piña track? Let us know in the comment section below. Rest in power, Celso!!

READ: This Isn’t Your Mama’s Cumbia: The Eclectic History Of Latin America’s Classic Music Genre

A Judge In Mexico City Has Approved One Couple’s Request For Recreational Cocaine

Things That Matter

A Judge In Mexico City Has Approved One Couple’s Request For Recreational Cocaine

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In a historic step toward ending the country’s deadly “war on drugs”, a judge in Mexico has approved the request of two people to legally possess, transport and use cocaine. Víctor Octavio Luna Escobedo, an administrative court judge in Mexico City, made the historic decisions saying “the consumption of cocaine doesn’t put one’s health in great risk, except in the case that it’s used chronically and excessively.”

Mexico United Against Crime (MUCD), a nongovernmental organization filed injunction requests on behalf of the two individuals. It pursued the case with goals to trying to change Mexico’s drug policy. At the core of the organization’s argument is that criminalizing consumers causes even more violence. If the ruling is ratified by a higher court, it would be the first time any cocaine use has been legal in Mexico.

According to Mexico Daily News, the Mexico City judge set a string of stipulations for the unidentified couple in order for them to use the cocaine. This includes regulating the amount they intake to 500 milligrams per day and not working, driving or operating heavy machinery while under the influence of the substance. This also includes not being able to consume cocaine in public, in the presence of children, or even encourage others to consume it.

So is cocaine really legal in Mexico? Here’s what you need to know. 

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The order by the judge to the country’s health authority has many wondering if one day Mexico could, at some point, legalize cocaine use, but only on a case-by-case basis. As of now, the judge’s ruling must be reviewed by a higher court panel of judges for the case to move forward. 

“We have been working for a safer, more just and peaceful Mexico for years, and with this case we insist on the need to stop criminalizing users of drugs other than marijuana and design better public policies that explore all available options, including the regulation,” Lisa Sanchez, director of MUAC, said in a statement.

The judge wrote in his ruling that the use of cocaine has certain benefits if consumed responsibly. “Ingestion can have various results, including alleviating tension, intensification of perceptions and the desire for new personal and spiritual experiences,” the judge said.

While two people have been allowed to take the drug, there is a bevy of injunctions and court orders that have followed. Which means the judge’s decisions could still be overturned.

Credit: @Vice / Twitter

 Cofepris, Mexico’s national health regulator, is being ordered to authorize the two people to legally possess, transport and use cocaine. But Cofepris says that such authorization is outside its power and has now blocked the court order as a result. The rulings are set to be reviewed by three collegiate court judges that will then set forth the legal standing of judges ruling.

The next step in the decision will be an appeal to the circuit court. This essentially means that the case could land all the way up to Mexico’s Supreme Court. Even if the decision is then upheld, cocaine wouldn’t suddenly become legal in Mexico. While in the U.S., a Supreme Court ruling makes it the law of the land, In Mexico the Supreme Court must hand down similar rulings in at least four other cases.

“This case is about insisting on the need to stop criminalizing users of drugs… and design better public policies that explore all the available options, including regulation,” Sanchez said.

The ruling could be a landmark moment and opportunity for debate in Mexico, where a 15 year-long drug war has taken the lives of many. 

Credit: @standardnews / Twitter

Mexico has become a central battleground and transit point for cocaine being transported to the United States. Trafficking gangs have also grown immensely since 2006 when then-President Felipe Calderón sent in the country’s army to fight drug traffickers. More than 20,000 people have been killed and 40,000 disappeared since then. This year has already been a stark reminder of the deadly drug war as Mexico is on pace to have the most murders on record.

“This case represents another step in the fight to construct alternative drug policies that allow [Mexico] to redirect its security efforts and better address public health,” Sanchez said. “We have spent years working for a more secure, just and peaceful Mexico.” 

READ: This Shipment Of Jalapeños Turned Out To Be One Of The Year’s Biggest Marijuana Bust

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