Entertainment

‘Narcos: Mexico’ Is Back For A Second Season: Here’s Everything We Know So Far

Since Netflix aired Narcos, the crime thriller retelling the rise of the cocaine trade in Colombia led by drug lord Pablo Escobar, the story has enjoyed indomitable success. After three seasons, Netflix and the show creators Chris Brancato, Doug Miro, and Carlo Bernard, created “Narcos: Mexico” a standalone story. Shifting the focus from Colombia to Mexico, the series tells the story of the Mexican drug trade all the way from the 80s down to what it is today. So, is there going to be a second season to the story? The answer is yes! 

Netflix announced the second season last year, just three weeks prior to the premiere of the first season. This upcoming season would make the franchise’s fifth installment. Little is known about the upcoming Narcos: Mexico 2 so far. There are numerous theories and speculations about what could possibly happen. So here’s all we know as of yet.

When will it be released?

Credit: narcos / Netflix

Netflix hasn’t announced an official release date yet. The series first dropped in November 2018, and production on season 2 began filming in Mexico City last year—where the first chapter was also filmed. All three seasons of Narcos and the standalone series have ten episodes per season, so if we follow the patternseries are usually released around the same time of year, we could expect a similar premiere date for the next installment around November this year.

The Plot and cast

View this post on Instagram

Welcome to Narcos: Mexico. Now meet your players in our Instagram Story

A post shared by Narcos (@narcos) on

At the end of the first season, it was revealed that Scoot McNairy, the unseen all-knowing narrator, was an agent who will lead a task force to indict those responsible for DEA Agent Kiki Camarena’s death, which is set up to be the plot for season two.

It’s speculated that viewers would witness what happened after the death of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent played by Michael Peña, who was captured and tortured before his death. The good guys in the DEA are expected to bring justice to the murder of one of their associates. And it’s been suggested that Kiki’s death would intensify the government’s war on drugs. 

“What occurred in Guadalajara gave beginning to the primary cartel. From that, others would observe. And the violence and cash and medicines, they simply fucking explode. It modified the DEA, too. Perhaps it woke us up, I don’t know,” Walt Breslin (Scoot McNairy) stated in the final moments of Season one, hinting at a possibly deepened war between the United States’ law enforcement and the drug cartel in season two.

Diego Luna and Scoot McNairy are set to return to the new installment of Narcos: Mexico. The cast will include Alejandro Edda as Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, Teresa Ruiz as Isabella Bautista, and Tenoch Huerta as Rafael Caro Quintero. It’s not certain if Alyssa Diaz will return to her role as Mika Camarena, the wife of Kiki. 

Depending on the direction the writers take Narcos: Mexico, the show could also see the rise of the Sinaloa Cartel in the late 80s as a result of Gallardo’s downfall after his capture and incarceration in 1989. 

Gallardo is currently serving his 37-year jail term in prison in Mexico for killing Kiki Camarena. The now 73-year-old said he was suffering from ill-health and wished to complete his sentence under house arrest. According to The Associated Press, Gallardo was denied the request. In a court ruling back in February of this year, it was decided that despite his advanced age, he was not qualified for release. 

Is there a trailer for season two?

View this post on Instagram

We’re building an empire. Why stop now?

A post shared by Narcos (@narcos) on

Gaumont International Television, the production studio behind Narcos: Mexico, has kept the show under wraps. We haven’t seen any trailers for the upcoming season revealed. It seems like we will only get to see images from season two after the production wraps. Diego Luna has said that the filming is still going on, so all we can do is keep a close eye on his social media to spot a sneak peek. 

The show recently received a WGA nomination in the “Episodic Drama” category. Diego Luna also received recognition for his role as Felix Gallardo. The Mexican actor was awarded a Critic’s Choice Award for Best Actor in a Drama Series after the first season of Narcos: Mexico.

Going back to the roots of the modern drug war, Narcos: Mexico is set in a time when the Mexican trafficking world was loose and disorganized, run by independent growers and users. Throughout the show we will witness the rise of the Guadalajara Cartel in the 1980s with Felix Gallardo at the helm, unifying traffickers in order to build an empire. A tragic chain of events unfolds as the drug trade grows and governments declare war against narco-trafficking for years to come. Season one is available to watch now on Netflix if you’re down for a binge run before the release of the second installment later this year.

READ: 21 Times Netflix’s “Narcos” Got It Wrong

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mexican Politician Accused Of Rape Vows To Block Elections Unless He’s Allowed To Run

Things That Matter

Mexican Politician Accused Of Rape Vows To Block Elections Unless He’s Allowed To Run

It’s an election year in Mexico and that means that things are heating up as candidates fight for the top spot. At the same time, Mexico is experiencing a burgeoning fight for women’s rights that demands accountability and justice. Despite all the marches and protests and civil disobedience by hundreds of thousands of Mexicans, it remains to be seen how much change will happen and when. 

Case in point: Félix Salgado, a candidate for governor of Guerrero who has been accused of rape and sexual assault but maintains the support of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO). Now, after being disqualified from the race because of undisclosed campaign finances, the candidate is vowing to block any elections from taking place unless he is allowed to continue his campaign. 

A disqualified candidate is vowing to block elections unless he’s allowed to run.

Félix Salgado was running to be governor of the Mexican state of Guerrero when he was faced with allegations of rape and sexual assault. The commission that selects party candidates allowed him to remain in the race and he continues to maintain the support of President AMLO – who is of the same political party, Morena. 

However, in late March, election regulators ordered that Salgado be taken off the ballot due to a failure to report campaign spending, according to the AP. Mexico’s electoral court ordered the Federal Electoral Institute (FEI) to reconsider their decision last week. Salgado is already threatening to throw the election process into chaos.

“If we are on the ballot, there will be elections,” Salgado told supporters in Guerrero after leading a caravan of protestors to the FEI’s office in Mexico City on Sunday. “If we are not on the ballot, there will not be any elections,” Salgado said.

The AP notes that Salgado is not making an empty threat. Guerrero is an embattled state overrun with violence and drug gangs and many elections have been previously disrupted. Past governors have been forced out of office before finishing their terms. Salgado was previously filmed getting into a confrontation with police in 2000.

It was just weeks ago that the ruling party allowed Salgado’s candidacy to move forward.

In mid-March, Morena confirmed that Félix Salgado would be its candidate for governor in Guerrero after completing a new selection process in which the former senator was reportedly pitted against four women.

Morena polled citizens in Guerrero last weekend to determine levels of support for five different possible candidates, according to media reports. Among the four women who were included in the process were Acapulco Mayor Adela Román and Senator Nestora Salgado.

Félix Salgado was the clear winner of the survey, even coming out on top when those polled were asked to opine on the potential candidates’ respect for the rights of women. He also prevailed in all other categories including honesty and knowledge of the municipality in which the poll respondents lived.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Things That Matter

Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com