Entertainment

‘Narcos: Mexico’ Is Back For A Second Season: Here’s Everything We Know So Far

Since Netflix aired Narcos, the crime thriller retelling the rise of the cocaine trade in Colombia led by drug lord Pablo Escobar, the story has enjoyed indomitable success. After three seasons, Netflix and the show creators Chris Brancato, Doug Miro, and Carlo Bernard, created “Narcos: Mexico” a standalone story. Shifting the focus from Colombia to Mexico, the series tells the story of the Mexican drug trade all the way from the 80s down to what it is today. So, is there going to be a second season to the story? The answer is yes! 

Netflix announced the second season last year, just three weeks prior to the premiere of the first season. This upcoming season would make the franchise’s fifth installment. Little is known about the upcoming Narcos: Mexico 2 so far. There are numerous theories and speculations about what could possibly happen. So here’s all we know as of yet.

When will it be released?

Credit: narcos / Netflix

Netflix hasn’t announced an official release date yet. The series first dropped in November 2018, and production on season 2 began filming in Mexico City last year—where the first chapter was also filmed. All three seasons of Narcos and the standalone series have ten episodes per season, so if we follow the patternseries are usually released around the same time of year, we could expect a similar premiere date for the next installment around November this year.

The Plot and cast

At the end of the first season, it was revealed that Scoot McNairy, the unseen all-knowing narrator, was an agent who will lead a task force to indict those responsible for DEA Agent Kiki Camarena’s death, which is set up to be the plot for season two.

It’s speculated that viewers would witness what happened after the death of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent played by Michael Peña, who was captured and tortured before his death. The good guys in the DEA are expected to bring justice to the murder of one of their associates. And it’s been suggested that Kiki’s death would intensify the government’s war on drugs. 

“What occurred in Guadalajara gave beginning to the primary cartel. From that, others would observe. And the violence and cash and medicines, they simply fucking explode. It modified the DEA, too. Perhaps it woke us up, I don’t know,” Walt Breslin (Scoot McNairy) stated in the final moments of Season one, hinting at a possibly deepened war between the United States’ law enforcement and the drug cartel in season two.

Diego Luna and Scoot McNairy are set to return to the new installment of Narcos: Mexico. The cast will include Alejandro Edda as Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, Teresa Ruiz as Isabella Bautista, and Tenoch Huerta as Rafael Caro Quintero. It’s not certain if Alyssa Diaz will return to her role as Mika Camarena, the wife of Kiki. 

Depending on the direction the writers take Narcos: Mexico, the show could also see the rise of the Sinaloa Cartel in the late 80s as a result of Gallardo’s downfall after his capture and incarceration in 1989. 

Gallardo is currently serving his 37-year jail term in prison in Mexico for killing Kiki Camarena. The now 73-year-old said he was suffering from ill-health and wished to complete his sentence under house arrest. According to The Associated Press, Gallardo was denied the request. In a court ruling back in February of this year, it was decided that despite his advanced age, he was not qualified for release. 

Is there a trailer for season two?

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We’re building an empire. Why stop now?

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Gaumont International Television, the production studio behind Narcos: Mexico, has kept the show under wraps. We haven’t seen any trailers for the upcoming season revealed. It seems like we will only get to see images from season two after the production wraps. Diego Luna has said that the filming is still going on, so all we can do is keep a close eye on his social media to spot a sneak peek. 

The show recently received a WGA nomination in the “Episodic Drama” category. Diego Luna also received recognition for his role as Felix Gallardo. The Mexican actor was awarded a Critic’s Choice Award for Best Actor in a Drama Series after the first season of Narcos: Mexico.

Going back to the roots of the modern drug war, Narcos: Mexico is set in a time when the Mexican trafficking world was loose and disorganized, run by independent growers and users. Throughout the show we will witness the rise of the Guadalajara Cartel in the 1980s with Felix Gallardo at the helm, unifying traffickers in order to build an empire. A tragic chain of events unfolds as the drug trade grows and governments declare war against narco-trafficking for years to come. Season one is available to watch now on Netflix if you’re down for a binge run before the release of the second installment later this year.

READ: 21 Times Netflix’s “Narcos” Got It Wrong

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Reports Of A New Series Depicting The Life Of Frida Kahlo Has The Internet Asking All Sorts Of Questions

Entertainment

Reports Of A New Series Depicting The Life Of Frida Kahlo Has The Internet Asking All Sorts Of Questions

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There are few people in this world that are as iconic as Frida Kahlo. She’s captured the minds and imaginations of generations of people from all over the world. We’ve seen her story told before, including on the big screen, but fans have long awaited a Netflix rendition of the artists unique story and now it seem like we may finally be getting what so many of us have wanted for so long.

The Frida Kahlo Corporation is developing a TV drama series based on the artist’s storied life.

Acording to a report by Deadline, the Frida Kahlo Corporation is working with a media company and famed Venezuelan composer and singer Carlos Baute to produce a drama series following the life of the iconic artist.

Frida Kahlo has inspired and influenced fans around the world and has had a major impact on the Latinx diaspora, the art world, feminism and culture as a whole. So, it seems that producers are pulling out all the stops to make sure they do right by the artist.

The series is being written by Latino talent, lead by Joel Novoa and Marilú Godinez. Novoa, who has worked on Arrow, Blood and Treasure and the feature film God’s Slave is attached to direct. The partnership will create a slate of content to celebrate the life of Frida Kahlo in different genres.

“The idea is to talk about what the books don’t,” said the writing duo in a joint statement. “The subtext behind each painting, the richness of Mexico’s 20th century and the revolution. Themes that are incredibly relevant at this unprecedented time.”

Carlos Dorado of the Frida Kahlo Corporation added, “Frida Kahlo corporation is always looking for talented people who know how to exalt the life of an icon like Frida Kahlo. In this case the professional team that has been formed is distinguished by its great professionalism, experience and most importantly the sensitivity to be able to approach a project as important and transcendental as Frida Kahlo. This high professional team will always have the support of Frida Kahlo Corporation.”

So when can we expect to see a series about one of the world’s greatest artists and feminist icons?

The team expects to start production of the series during the second half of 2021. A studio has already shown interest and the presentation of the project to the market is expected to occur in February.

“We are currently developing and writing the basis of the series and expect to be ready to present the project in the upcoming weeks,” the team said in a statement.

Also, why has it taken so long?!

Should the series find a studio and distributor, this would be the first drama series focusing on Kahlo in recent history. It’s been almost twenty years since her story was told on the big screen, when Salma Hayek portrayed the icon in the 2002 film Frida. That film went on to earn six Oscar nominations, winning for Best Makeup and Best Original Score. More recently, Kahlo was voiced by Natalia Cordova-Buckley in the Oscar-winning Pixar pic Coco. 

In addition to this, in 2019 it was announced that there would be an animated film about the painter.

But fans of the iconic feminist and artist have long hoped to see a TV series depicting her larger than life personality and role in shaping the world we live in today and it looks like we may finally get what we’ve asked for.

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Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

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Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

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Love him or hate him, Mexico’s President Andres Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) has long called himself the voice of the people – and many Mexicans agree with him. That’s why his latest announcement against social media companies has many so worried.

In the wake of Twitter and Facebook’s (along with many other social media platforms) announcement that they would be restricting or banning Donald Trump from their platforms, the Mexican president expressed his contempt for the decisions. And his intention to create a Mexican social network that won’t be held to the standards from Silicon Valley.

Mexico’s AMLO moves to create a social media network for Mexicans outside of Silicon Valley’s control.

A week after his United States counterpart was kicked off Facebook and Twitter, President López Obrador floated the idea of creating a national social media network to avoid the possibility of Mexicans being censored.

Speaking at his daily news conference, AMLO instructed the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt) and other government departments to look at the possibility of creating a state-owned social media site that would guarantee freedom of speech in Mexico.

“We care about freedom a lot, it’s an issue that’s going to be addressed by us,” he told reporters. He also added that Facebook and Twitter have become “global institutions of censorship,” sounding a lot like the alt-right terrorists that stormed the U.S. Capitol.

“To guarantee freedom, for freedom, so there’s no censorship in Mexico. We want a country without censorship. Mexico must be a country of freedom. This is a commitment we have,” he told reporters.

AMLO deeply criticized the moves by Twitter and Facebook to ban Trump from their platforms.

Credit: Hector Vivas / Getty Images

AMLO – like Trump – is an avid user of social media to connect with his constituents. He’s also been known to spread falsehoods and boast about his achievements on the platforms – sound familiar?

So, it came as little surprise when he tore into social media companies for ‘censoring’ Donald Trump, saying that they have turned into “global institutions of censorship” and are carrying out a “holy inquisition.”

Nobody has the right to silence citizens even if their views are unpopular, López Obrador said. Even if the words used by Trump provoked a violent attack against his own government.

“Since they took these decisions [to suspend Trump], the Statue of Liberty has been turning green with anger because it doesn’t want to become an empty symbol,” he quipped.

So what could a Mexican social media network be called?

The president’s proposal to create a national social media network triggered chatter about what such a site would or should be called. One Twitter user suggested Facemex or Twitmex, apparently taking his inspiration from the state oil company Pemex.

The newspaper Milenio came up with three alternative names and logos for uniquely Mexican sites, suggesting that a Mexican version of Facebook could be called Facebookóatl (inspired by the Aztec feathered-serpent god Quetzalcóatl), Twitter could become Twitterlopochtli (a riff on the name of Aztec war, sun and human deity Huitzilopochtli) and Instagram could become Instagratlán (tlán, which in the Náhuatl language means place near an abundance of something – deer, for example, in the case of Mazatlán – is a common suffix in Mexican place names.)

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