Entertainment

‘Orange Is The New Black’ Made One Big Mistake And Latinos On Twitter Are Not Going To Let It Slide

Orange Is The New Black / Netflix

Everyone’s favorite locked-up Latina pair are scheming again on the new season of “Orange Is The New Black.” As improvisation is pretty much the way of life in lock up, these Latinas found a way to stay glam behind bars using whatever household items were available to them. However, either written into the script, or a brain fart by one of our favorite actresses (hey, it happens) somebody messed up the name of one of our most beloved ingredients, and Twitter responded accordingly.

SPOILERS AHEAD!

This season finds Flaca (Jackie Cruz) and Maritza (Diane Guerrero) in the middle of a prison shutdown, brought on by a riot and hostage situation. See, I told you there were spoilers, but no, you didn’t listen. In any event, the pair is trying their best to take advantage of the situation. With the convicts taking over the prison, cell phones have been reclaimed and redistributed.

Flaca and Maritza, trying to get a following outside of the prison, get their hands on one of the phones. Using the phone’s camera, they try to do a DIY makeup tutorial, jail style. Maritza knows that in jail, you have to improvise. Using household items, she shows that just because you’re locked-up, doesn’t mean you have to look jacked-up.

With a selfie stick, made from a plunger and tape, Flaca records Maritza’s beauty tutorial.

Credit: Orange Is The New Black / Netflix

Announcer voice: “Doing a short stint? How about 25 to life? No worries, you too can contour and highlight like a free-person!”

The tutorial starts off great.

Credit: Orange Is The New Black / Netflix

With actual good advice like this, you would almost certainly tune in to watch their show.

And here Maritza is finally ready to reveal her secrets.

Credit: Orange Is The New Black / Netflix

Oh wow, just by looking at what’s on her makeshift prison vanity, you can make out some items that might look familiar from mami’s cabinets.

But here is where the tutorial gets controversial…

Credit: Orange Is The New Black / Netflix

“Cinnamon, cumin and Sazón Goya.” Some astute viewers realized that the bottle Guerrero / Maritza is pointing to is in fact not Sazón, which everyone knows comes in a box of single-sized packets, as opposed to Adobo, which comes in a cylindrical plastic bottle.

For further clarification we present to you Exhibit A:

Credit: Goya

Maritza obviously pointed to the Adobo when she clearly says “Sazón.” Which, to be honest, might just be a better seasoning to use on the face, it would definitely give you that rosy cheekbone.

Latinos collectively felt like this [in Spanish] after this mistake.

Credit: Orange Is The New Black / Netflix

I told you there were spoilers…

Who knows what went wrong. It could’ve been written that way for Maritza, or an innocent mistake by Diane Guerrero.

Pizza GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY
Credit: Orange Is The New Black / Netflix

Or maybe neither of them really pay attention to seasonings because they like pizza.

Whatever the case may be, Twitter had a field day with it.

Twitter user @chrissieortiz called out the show itself directly with a big ol’ “WTF #OITNB?”

Some blamed Guerrero directly.

Twitterer @RebeccaAvilas said, “I was ashamed for a good minute.” That’s some abuela level shade.

Others blamed Maritza, though.

If you watched the previous seasons, you know that Maritza was a scam artist by trade. There’s no time to cook when you’re stealing cars in stilettos.

This Twitter user came with the receipts.

“How the hell do you get the Latina to screw that up?!” Wrote the clearly annoyed Twitter user @Project_Vectrix.

This Twitter user needed a warning.

At least @nessa_monsta is asking the hard questions. “Why did she say Sazón Goya when pointing at Adobo Goya?”

On second thought, Sazón or Adobo, if it makes my face smell like mami’s perníl, I’m down.

Credit: Orange Is The New Black / Netflix

Honestly, anything you put on my face that reminds me of abuela’s home cooking, I’m down for. Forget the makeup, just make me a plate.

Seasoning mistakes aside, there’s no one more resourceful than Latinas.

Credit: Orange Is The New Black / Netflix

My abuela could make seven different meals with eggs, white rice and Lipton soup. DIY for real.

As much as “Flaritza” has gotten social media guff about their seasoning faux-pas, let’s not forget, in real life, these two are Queens. ????

Flaritza forever ❤️

A post shared by Orange is the New Black (@oitnb) on

Looks like they made the smart choice here and skipped on the Goya-based makeup. ? ?  ?


READ: Diane Guerrero and Jackie Cruz Show the World What Perfect #BFFGoals Looks Like


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ICE Targets Immigrant Helpline After It Appears In Episode Of ‘Orange Is The New Black’ Proving The Cruelty Is The Point

Things That Matter

ICE Targets Immigrant Helpline After It Appears In Episode Of ‘Orange Is The New Black’ Proving The Cruelty Is The Point

@cmargalaz / Twitter

In it’s seventh and final season, Orange Is The New Black aired a storyline to shed light on the dehumanizing features of immigration detention centers. However, there was a glimmer of hope presented in the fictional Netflix series: a hotline for immigrant detainees that provided free lawyers. Best of all, the hotline existed in real life. It’s not crazy to think that the level of exposure the show provided for the hotline could literally save lives. 

But even on the show, use of the hotline came with a warning: “You have to be careful, though. Apparently, if they figure out that you’re using the hotline, Big Brother shuts it down,” Gloria warns Maritza in the seventh season. 

In a chilling twist, consistent with the Trump administration’s war against immigrants, two weeks after the series aired, the hotline was shut down. It’s nothing short of gut-wrenching. 

Immigration advocates want answers. 

The California group Freedom for Immigrants, an organization that runs visitation programs in detention centers nationally and who provides the hotline, believes ICE’s decision to shut down the hotline was a direct response to Maritza’s immigration storyline. 

On Thursday, Freedom for Immigrants responded to the shutdown with a cease and desist letter. The letter claims that termination of the hotline is a violation of free speech and is retaliation by the government. Over 100 organizations and six actors from Orange is the New Black signed the letter addressed to ICE Director Matthew Albence. 

“Even a freely given benefit such as the pro bono hotline can’t be taken away simply because the government is now unhappy with how we are sharing with the public what we know from our communications with people inside,” said Christina Fialho, co-executive director of Freedom for Immigrants.

Maritza’s story is too familiar.

Diane Guerrero who portrays Martiza in the show has been an outspoken advocate of immigration reform. Born to undocumented immigrants from Colombia, Guerrero, who is a citizen, stayed in the U.S. after her family was deported when she was 14. She told her story in the memoir In the Country We Love. Just as it is for most Latinxs living in the U.S., immigration for Guerro is clearly personal. 

When Maritza’s character is essentially left for dead at an immigration detention center, she is told about the Freedom for Immigrants hotline by Gloria. The hotline was toll-free, a pivotal detail because immigrants don’t have the right to a free phone call after they are detained. Heroically, the duo passed the hotline number to other detainees. It was a small act of liberation, as was featuring it on the show. 

Abolish ICE.

ICE told the organization that that tollfree numbers for pro bono attorneys and organizations require approval by the Executive Office for Immigration Review. Funny, it was never an issue before. Almost seems like this administration is actively seeking legal loopholes to be as cruel and callous toward immigrants as possible. Freedom for Immigrants has provided the hotline since 2013. The organization received as many as 14,000 calls a month from detainees and is run by volunteers who connect immigrants with free lawyers. Losing this service will have a cascading negative impact on immigrants and their loved ones.

The cruelty is the point.

Meanwhile, the ACLU is suing the Ascension Parish Sheriff’s Office in Louisiana for the unlawful jailing of Ramon Torres. Despite providing his passport, social security card, and driver’s license to police officers to prove his citizenship, he was jailed for four days. The Sherriff’s Office deputies told Torres that every Hispanic person was being automatically held for immigration review. Yes, they’re rounding us up. Because we know, because we been knew, this was never about immigration status. This has always been about race. 

“Ramon Torres was held in jail for four days simply because he has brown skin and a Latino name,” ACLU of Louisiana legal director Katie Schwartzmann said. “This is racial profiling, which is unconstitutional and deeply harmful to our communities. What happened to Mr. Torres is inexcusable. Locking people up based on race or ethnicity is antithetical to our most cherished American values.”

We won’t be silenced.

There’s no sugar-coating what is happening in the United States. While it has never been the American Dream we were promised, now it is increasingly dangerous to be Latinx in America. Our stories and visibility matter most of all during this time. Art has the power to enlighten and normalize experiences. Art has a way of bringing the unseen to the forefront. This usually activates its viewers for the better. However, we have an administration that lacks any and all humanity. “Now we see life mimic art in the most destructive way,” she said. “I wish this were more of a fictional situation and we were exaggerating reality, but it’s kind of the other way around,” said Laura Gomez who plays Blanca, another character who falls victim to ICE on the show.

These Are The Latinas Who Made OITNB Great And Why We Love Them So Much

Entertainment

These Are The Latinas Who Made OITNB Great And Why We Love Them So Much

oitnb / Instagram

Alerta! This article contains SPOILERS on the final season of the Netflix show Orange is the New Black!

Throughout seven seasons, Orange is the New Black has shown a microcosm of the United States in all its diversity (sexual, political and ethnic). The show led by Jenji Kohan (the mastermind behind Weeds) began airing in 2013 and through seven seasons it told the stories of women from all segments of society. 

The inmates of Litchfield Prison represent some of the most vulnerable members of society.

Credit: oitnb / Instagram

Among them, there are Latinas who have no papers or who come from impoverished backgrounds. Throughout the years we got to understand the Kafkaesque mechanisms through which the industrial incarceration system works and how it profits from disgrace. The show also cast a shadow of doubt over the fairness of the court system and how it is potentially discriminatory towards minorities.

This season is all about ICE detention centers. Remember the beautiful bond between Flaca and Maritza? Well, be ready to [cry in Spanish].

Credit: serelp / Instagram

The Vancouver Province, for example, rated the season highly, even though for some viewers season six lost a lot of steam, and it claims that the strength of the season lies in the ICE storyline: “The trickiest storyline, however, belongs to a frightening and undeniably timely one that takes place in an immigrant detention center where women from Central America to the Middle East and beyond are stuck with cocky ICE agents, and without any answers or real hope of getting the better life they were initially seeking.”

Veteran actress Kate Mulgrew, who plays Soviet queen Red, told The Hollywood Reporter: “Using the kitchen as the aperture into ICE and the detention center was such a powerful device. When I walked onto that set I had to stand still and say, ‘Oh, my God. This is what we are doing.’ It’s being reflected for the first time on this show. The creative accountability is great and the creative risk is even greater. She’s got some balls, Jenji Kohan”. Alysia Reiner, who plays former warden Natalie “Fig” Figueroa, expanded in the same roundtable: “I lost it when we were shooting inside the immigration courtroom. We did three takes and I couldn’t stop crying. Our writers told us, “We went to these courtrooms. We didn’t candy-coat this, but this is not as bad as it actually is right now.”

So what happened to our favorite Latinas? Last warning, some SERIOUS SPOILERS AHEAD! 

Maritza Ramos played by Diane Guerrero

Credit: oitnb / Instagram

Right from season 1 we fell in love with Maritza, the sassy Colombian queen who ended up in prison for her elaborate scams. She is a cornerstone of the last season: her storyline meets reality, as she faces the immigration authorities. In real life, Diane Guerrero’s parents were deported when she was just a girl. Guerrero told The Hollywood Reporter: “The treatment of Maritza’s ending was a portrayal of how people treat deportations — that sentiment that you vanish is true. It’s as if you’ve never existed. Martiza is on that plane to an uncertain life”. Life is stranger than fiction, however, and Maritza’s case is not uncommon in the era of Trump (at whom the scriptwriters take a good amount of jabs). 

Gloria Mendoza played by Selenis Leyva

Credit: oitnb / Instagram

This boricua lady is fierce as it comes (she is played by a Cuban, though, but totally gets that Caribbean sass). She always puts family first, both in and outside prison. She is one of the few characters with a somewhat redemptive ending. Her story strikes true to many Puerto Ricans who are treated as foreigners in their own country. In the last season, we see how Gloria left the island initially to work in New York and provide for her children.

The mother-daughter duo: Aleida and Dyanara Diaz, played by Elizabeth Rodriguez and Dasha Polanco

Credit: oitnb / Instagram

We learnt so much more about Aleida in the last season. She is a strong Latina who has had to protect herself from handsy men her whole life. She is combative and that leads her back into trouble after her release. The relationship she has with her daughter Dayanara is the stuff that nightmares are made of.

❤️❤️❤️❤️

Credit: Orange is the New Black / Netflix

Dayanara ended up all Scarface: running the prison with an iron fist. Or did she? (yes, we are giving you some spoilers, but no details here, no se espanten). Daya is the perfect example of how a twisted family can lead to an endless spiral of violence. 

Marisol “Flaca” Gonzales played by Jackie Cruz

Credit: oitnb / Instagram

A cute and sometimes naive chola who is put in prison for drug fraud. She has a sisterly bond with Maritza. She is the typical inmate who ends up behind bars for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. We leave her truly seeking redemption. The actress that plays her, Jackie Cruz, is a proud Dominican who is unafraid to speak about the biases in Hollywood. She told Elle about the roles that are available for actresses like her: “Lately, it’s been better. Well, the roles are still a little white-washed, but they’re better. It’s what a white person would think of a Latina. A white person writing for a Latina. For example, they don’t know that Dominicans don’t eat Chimichangas”. 

Blanca played by Laura Gomez

Credit: oitnb / Instagram

Her scenes in the immigration court are heartbreaking. In this microcosm, we get to see what hundreds of migrant women are going through, being separated from their children in some cases and facing deportation to a country they barely remember in others. Gomez told Digital Spy: “That was such a twist for everybody, myself included, and I could never have imagined that it was going to feel so emotional for people. The response on social media to this was devastating. Because we’re living this in real-time, it’s not like we’re telling a story in the past… It should be a story that isn’t happening”. Her story is very accurate, according to reports, particularly in how advocacy groups such as Freedom for Immigrants have been targeted by ICE and seen their advocacy efforts sabotaged. As a representative of the organization told In Style: “In 2013, ICE shut down three visitation programs that we were affiliated with, in response to a Huffington Post blog we wrote. Our personal cell phone numbers also have been blocked at various points in time from immigrant jails and prisons. And while we have continued to offer free phone calls to people in detention thanks to the generosity of our donors, we are still fighting to get our hotline restored”

Maria Ruiz played by Jessica Pimentel

Credit: thecrusher007 / Instagram

The Dominican freedom fighter! Her dad was an activist and she finds herself being angry at life for most of the show. She was pregnant when she was incarcerated and has a thorny relationship with her baby’s dad, who is taking care of little Pepa while Maria is in prison. Her crime: selling fake jeans. Yes, really. 

READ: Maritza’s Heartbreaking Storyline In ‘Orange Is The New Black’ Is A Reality So Many Undocumented People Face Every Day

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