Entertainment

Remakes Come And Go But Here Are Many Reasons Why Lynda Carter Is The Best Wonder Woman That Will Ever Live

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Lynda Carter has forever written her name in Hollywood history thanks to her role as Princess Diana, also known as Wonder Woman and Diana Prince. She played the iconic superhero in a TV show that ran for four years (1975-1979), but her legacy lives on. She was born in 1951 in Phoenix, Arizona. Besides being a great person and an actress, she is also known for being a singer, songwriter, model, and beauty pageant titleholder. Having been born close to the border, it comes as no surprise that she has Latino heritage. 

Here are some of the reasons that make us say that she is the best Wonder Woman in history (sorry, Gal Gadot, absolutely no disrespect to you!). Reading her story one can’t stop but think of the words that Antiope told Diana in the Wonder Woman movie: “You are stronger than you believe. You have greater powers than you know.”

She is genuinely a good human being.

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Just take this photo as an example. Here, she is all smiles with her successor, Israeli sensation Gal Gadot. She doesn’t seem to be too fussed about pasar la batuta and is like the aunt we all wish we had in wishing happy birthday to the new Mujer Maravilla

She is proud of her Mexican heritage.

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Yes, that’s right. Her full name is Linda Jean Córdova Carter! Her dad has Irish-Scottish heritage, and her mom Juanita was the daughter of a Mexican family. 

She married the love of her life, a romantic role-model for us all.

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Just a few human beings are lucky enough to find the love of their life. Lynda married talent agent Ron Samuels in 1977, but the marriage only lasted five years. She then met her everything: lawyer Robert A. Altman, who she married in 1984. After the wedding, she left Hollywood in 1985 and moved to Washington. The couple has two children: James and Jessica. 

She embodied women’s new role in society.

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Lynda has always been a great supporter of women’s rights, and she takes every opportunity, such as International Women’s Day, to sat so. After all, she embodied an amazing female superhero in a day and age when women were trying to break free from the manacles of traditional gender roles. 

She is an ally of the LGBTQ+ community.

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Carter often attends Pride Marches and has used her standing as a cultural icon in the United States to speak out against discrimination. She was the Grand Marshal for the 2011 Phoenix Pride Parade and the 2011 New York Pride Parades. She had the same role in the 2013 Capital Pride Parade in Washington. She has said: “Every gay reader understands the secret self that is full and wonderful and has longing and tenderness and a desire for connection to other people. I think that arguments against gay marriage are just ridiculous! Who cares? People want to get married for the same reason I wanted to get married. They want to do it in front of their friends and family.” 

She is super friendly with fans.

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Even if she left Hollywood in 1985 to raise her family, Lynda Carter is currently a constant feature in fan conventions and Comic-Con events across the country. She is truly different from many of those arrogant celebrities who see fans as a necessary evil. Lynda, on the contrary, is happy to sign autographs and smile for the occasional fan selfie. We love you, Lynda! 

She has recovered from alcohol and drug addiction and helps others stay on the wagon.

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Showbiz brings many pressures and temptations both to those who are looking for a breakthrough and for those who have established a career. Lynda is a recovering alcoholic who found the strength to quit due to her husband’s unmovable support. She stated in an interview: “After 18 years of recovery, I live every day with immense gratitude. I am forever thankful for my family and friends who stood by me and encouraged me… and for those who helped me heal.” This requires true superpowers and belief in oneself. Good for you, Lynda! She has been sober for 20 years and often speaks at events where she encourages others to find their inner strength and do the same. 

She has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame since 2018.

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It kind of sucks that a new version of Wonder Woman had to come out in the cinema for the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce to give Lynda Carter her much deserved Hollywood Walk of Fame star. It happened on April 3, 2018, and it was unveiled by Patty Jenkins, the director of the 2018 fantastic superhero feminist extravaganza Wonder Woman

Boys had Superman, girls had the much cooler Wonder Woman.

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It must have sucked to be a girl in the pre-Wonder Woman era when it comes to role models. Boys had plenty to choose from, with the alien Superman being perhaps the most famous of them all. Wonder Woman was much, much cooler though: she belonged to an ancient tribe of Amazon warriors who lived in a matriarchy, and she passed as Diana Prince, a slightly geeky but also a sexy woman. Superman is a nerd in comparison, and don’t get us started on lame Clark Kent. 

She was a hipster before hipsters existed.

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We mean, just look at how she wears those big frames and that cute choker scarf. Giving us Williamsburg vibes from the past! She was goofy and cute and amazing in her 1970s incarnation of Princess Diana. 

She was a body positivity queen.

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In this day and age when the fashion and entertainment industry promotes unhealthy ideals when it comes to body type, it is a good idea to remember Lynda Carter and how sure she was of her womanly body. Bodies come in all shapes and sizes, and Lynda Carter just was comfortable in hers. Frame this kickass quote: “My only interest in women’s clothes is what’s underneath them.” 

And now she wears her wrinkles with grace and pride.

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There are few things more empowering than a woman who fills at ease in her body. Carter is 67 and looks stunning: she wears those wrinkles as signs of her wisdom and maturity, as a testament of the many obstacles she has faced in her life, such as recovering from addiction. 

She was a beauty queen and for good reason: brains and looks, she has it all.

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Before becoming a Hollywood celeb, Lynda first captured the country’s imagination as a beauty queen. Carter won a local Arizona beauty contest in 1972, and then went on to win the title of Miss World USA in that same year. 

She has an awesome explanation of why Wonder Woman is an ageless symbol of girl power.

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She says that contrary to other female superheroes, Wonder Woman actually understands female identity. Of other superheroes, she said: “they’re not showcasing any of the tremendous dichotomies that women possess in term of softness and toughness, sweetness and grit, inner and outer strength.” And yes, our dear Princess Diana shows all of these qualities!

READ: Wonder Woman Isn’t The Only Latina Superhero To Be On Display At The Smithsonian In Washington

‘Coco’ En Vivo Is Now A Reality As Disney And Pixar Announce A Live Production At LA’s Hollywood Bowl

Entertainment

‘Coco’ En Vivo Is Now A Reality As Disney And Pixar Announce A Live Production At LA’s Hollywood Bowl

Disney / Pixar / YouTube

Coco is one of those movies that redefined our Latinidad in the eyes of mainstream Hollywood. Not only did it make me cry my eyes out because of the all-too-relateable story line but it also made me super emotional to know that kids these days had someone they could see themselves in on the big screen. It was a huge moment and still is one of my favorite movies of the last ten years.

So news that it might be getting the en vivo treatment has me beyond excited.

According to both Disney and Pixar, the beloved Coco will be brought to life this upcoming November just in time for those of us celebrating Día de Muertos. The real life production will be coming to LA’s famed Hollywood Bowl and not only will it feature several original cast members (looking at you Benjamin Bratt) but it will also include a live orchestra, Mariachi Divas, and the voices of Eva Longoria and Miguel just to name a few.

Disney’s Coco is coming to life!

The Oscar-winning cartoon will be recreated for the stage during a special two-night run at the Hollywood Bowl. The one stage production will be brought to life for the first time on November 8 and 9. Fans, who are encouraged to dress in Día de Muertos costumes, will be able to watch the film on the Bowl’s movie screen.

Throughout the production, the film will be accompanied by a live full orchestra.

Mariachi Divas are also set to perform for guests during the event. Coco live will feature a host of star power.

Conductor Sarah Hicks will lead the full orchestra performing Michael Giacchino’s original score along with special guests performing the film’s songs including: ‘Remember Me’, ‘Un Poco Loco’, and ‘The World Es Mi Familia’.

Alongside the film’s stars, several other big name celebs will be in attendance and helping make the event extra special.

Credit: @DisneyMusic / Twitter

The film’s stars Jaime Camil, Anthony Rodriguez and Alanna Ubach will be making cameos. Benjamin Bratt, who played Ernesto de la Cruz, in the film will host the event with Eva Longoria. Other stars set to make an appearance are Lele Pons, Carlos Rivera and Rudy Mancuso. Natalia Jimenez and Miguel will also be present for the festivities. The pair performed the Oscar-winning song Remember Me during the 2018 Academy Awards.

And everyone involved seems nearly as excited as we are to be a part of this production!

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“I’m very excited to join this incredible group of exceptional talent, in the city that I’m from, to bring this very special move and message to life,” Miguel said in a statement.

Natalia Jimenez also shared her excitement for the project.

She said: “Mis raíces latinas son mi orgullo y celebrarlo sumando mi voz a la música de Coco en el Hollywood Bowl es un honor.”

Translation: “My Latin roots are my pride and celebrating it by adding my voice to Coco‘s music at the Hollywood Bowl is an honor.“

While Alex Gonzalez was thrilled to be celebrating ancestors and so much more.

“The idea of celebrating ancestors is very dear to my heart, especially after the passing of my grandparents.” Alex Gonzalez shared his excitement about the production saying: “Coco is my heart, it means everything to me. It’s ancestors, family, music, love, culture, traditions, dreams, and passion. Coco is everything that inspires, connects, and makes the world a better place. It’s a unique film.”

He added, “The Hollywood Bowl is a very special place where we can celebrate and share our love and appreciation for music and Coco! It’s a huge honor and privilege to be a part of this beautiful performance at the Hollywood Bowl. I am so excited, can’t wait!”

We can’t wait either and here’s all the info you need to get your tickets:

Tickets for the special event got on sale Friday, September 13 at 12pm PST. But you can get them on pre-sale tomorrow.

Now, excuse us, while we book our tickets to LA!

Meet Frederico Vigil, The Creator Of The Largest Concave Fresco in North America – Mundos De Mestizaje

Culture

Meet Frederico Vigil, The Creator Of The Largest Concave Fresco in North America – Mundos De Mestizaje

Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

When visiting the National Hispanic Cultural Center campus in Albuquerque, New Mexico, it’s easy to write-off the upside-down, bucket shape form rising from the ground. It stands alone with no distinguishing marks. There are no large crowds to hint at the remarkable secret hidden inside. Visitors will know they are in the right place when the gray asphalt and concrete beneath their feet morph into red—matching the building’s exterior.

Two, towering wood doors mark the entry into the nondescript building.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

When the doors swing open, it’s impossible to avoid looking up because the vibrant colors of the ceiling act as a magnet, drawing eyes upwards. Step into the 45-foot dome-shaped structure to get a better look, and there, in the small Southwest town of less than 1 million, the largest fresco painting in North America wraps around the ceiling.

El Torreón is the name of the structure which houses Mundos de Mestizaje.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

The larger-than-the-Sistine-Chapel fresco made by Frederico Vigil. It took the Santa Fe native almost three years to have it approved and 10 years to complete it. The aerial artwork depicts thousands of years of Hispanic and pre-Hispanic history. Depending on your cultural background, some iconography is easy to spot and place in history. If you’re Mexican, La Virgen de Guadalupe, a portrait of the beloved civil rights leader Benito Juárez and the eagle, serpent, and nopal from Mexico’s coat of arms will stand out. But walk around the room, or sit in one of the lounging chairs that allow visitors to tip back and view the work at 180 degrees, and soon you’ll realize there are hidden figures among the more popular markers of Mexican and Indigenous identity.

“I’m a mixed man with many different bloodlines,” Vigil says on a phone call. “I’m mestizo. I wanted to show the history of what that means.”

For the project, Vigil consulted with seven scholars on Mesoamerican and Spanish historical culture in order to create an accurate depiction of the past.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

He says that just by looking at the Iberian Peninsula, there’s a mix of Romans, Celts, Muslims, and Phoenicians which is all tied into Spanish identity. Then, with the Americas, there’s Maya, Aztec and Toltec. The history of these lines iS not linear. They overlap, intertwine and blend together in a dizzying ride that Vigil worked to bring to life in Mundos de Mestizaje. 

The purpose is to show the viewer how interconnected and far-reaching culture is. Islamic philosopher Ibn Rushd is depicted sitting next to Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, a Medieval Torah scholar, and physician. Chacmool, the pre-Columbian sculpture found throughout Mesoamerica shares space with George Washington and an African slave. 

“There are no purebloods, we are all mixed—or perhaps the only people who can say they are of pure blood are the Amazons or indigenous tribes that have lived in isolation,” Vigil says. “When people begin to study the past, they realize we, as a society, are not genetically one thing.”

Vigil learned the art of fresco painting from Lucienne Bloch and Stephen Pope Dimitroff. The couple might not be household names outside of the art community, but their bosses were. Bloch and Dimitroff were assistants to the world-renowned Mexican artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. 

Vigil connected with the couple thanks to the Santa Fe Council for The Arts.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

The organization reached out to Vigil to gauge his interest in a scholarship learning from the pair. Now in their 70s, the two aging artists were making strides to ensure their knowledge was passed down to a new generation of creators. Art lessons were accompanied by tales of the past that included Kahlo, Rivera, and friends such as Leon Trotsky. There, he learned the complicated and time-consuming process of fresco painting.

A surface is rough plastered with a mix of lime, sand, and cement. On average, a layer takes 10-12 hours to dry. A painter can go to work an hour into the drying process and usually has between seven to nine hours of time to complete their design. The art then needs 7-10 days between coats. If the painter messes up, they have to scrape off the layers and begin again.

“I’m a procrastinator but when the wall is wet, you have to paint,” says Vigil. “Each painting is a new experience. It doesn’t get old.”

Vigil is currently working on a new 2,500-plus square foot monumental fresco at the Albuquerque Convention Center.

Credit: Courtesy of Ximena N. Larkin

His new work tells the tale of New Mexico’s history as the oldest state in the U.S. to produce wine. He says the piece could take four to six years to complete. He’s currently in his second year.

The hours for the Torreón (where the fresco is housed) are Saturdays and Sundays from 12-5 p.m., plus it is open by appointment, which can be scheduled with Juanita Ramírez at Juanita.ramirez@state.nm.us or 505-383-4774. The NHCC presents concerts in the Torreón in partnership with the Pimentel & Sons Guitar Makers. The Torreón is available for rentals under certain circumstances and with some restrictions. 

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