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Check Out These LGBTQ+ People Turning The Beauty Guru World Upside Down

gabrielzamora / Instagram

The LGBTQ community is setting a new bar of strength, unity, and absolute fabulosity. Double tapping the gender-bending, mesmerizingly precise and stunning work of LGBTQ beauty boys, trans models, and pioneers in the industry is an act of defiance against toxic beauty standards and the patriarchy.

Our community is breaking through barriers that have kept us in the shadows. Behold, the beauty gurus of 2019 that will bring you uninterrupted beautiful queer inspo all year long.

Manny MUA

CREDIT: @mannymua733 / Instagram

Manny MUA is the most famous Latino LGBTQ beauty guru, with over 4 million YouTube subscribers and 4 million followers on Instagram. MUA grew up in a Mormon family and was sent to conversion therapy as a teenager. His family let him stop after he became clinically depressed.

Follow @mannymua733 for looks like this:

CREDIT: @mannymua733 / Instagram

At first, he wanted to become a plastic surgeon but is transforming faces without scalpels left and right. In December 2017, he posted a video opening up about his diagnosis with vitiligo, a condition that looks like patches of skin losing their pigmentation.

Carmen Carrera

CREDIT: @carmen_carrera / Instagram

We first met Carmen Carrera on RuPaul’s Drag Race before she transitioned. She’s been admired since day one for her natural beauty and is a transgender activist first and foremost. She even called out RuPaul himself for his transphobic segments on the show, since removed after her public protests.

Follow @carmen_carrera to see her supermodel stardom.

CREDIT: @carmen_carrera / Instagram

Today, she is a proud Latina trans activist, and has graced magazine covers, walked runways and become an ambassador to elite gym Equinox. Fans have petitioned Victoria’s Secret to invite Carrera to walk the runway, but the company continues to ignore and exclude trans people from their shows.

Gabriel Zamora

CREDIT: @gabrielzamora / Instagram

Born and raised in Houston, Zamora’s parents moved from Mexico to Texas to give their kids a better life. English wasn’t really permitted in the house. He told VivaLa about how his bond with his parents has helped him become who he is today: “I know I’m one of the luckiest people in this world to have the mother that I have because I knew many people who didn’t have accepting parents. My mother loves me unconditionally. There are no ifs, ands, or buts — she loves me.”

Follow @gabrielzamora for unabashed self-love.

CREDIT: @gabrielzamora / Instagram

“You just have to be yourself, and you have to embrace yourself and find out why you’re different and enjoy that. I think that’s what makes me me because I am Latino, I am a gay male, and I wear makeup. I embrace all those three things and I think my social media family loves that I do. Not because I am that, but because I, myself, embody that and they can hopefully see something in me that they can see in themselves — and they can hopefully like it,” he told VivaLA.

Glam Boy Jay

CREDIT: @glamboyjay / Instagram

Based in Los Angeles, this is as natural as you’ll ever see Glam Boy Jay get on his feed. After scrolling through his feed and being in awe, you will quickly be reminded on his YouTube channel that he is just a nervous, relatable teenage boy like anyone else.

Follow @glamboyjay and try to not be totally entranced by his realness & beauty.

CREDIT: @glamboyjay / Instagram

While his makeup is forever flawless, edgy, y a veces in stunning drag, you need to follow him for his acrylics game. Dale.

Alex Faction

CREDIT: @alexfaction / Instagram

Known as Alex Rivera by his mother, Alex isn’t going to show you how to look anything but flawless. He graduated from beauty school, unlike all our mothers, and has since delved into optical illusion theatrical makeup.

Follow @alexfaction for pro makeup artist effects.

CREDIT: @alexfaction / Instagram

Know how we all love J.Lo’s Halloween makeup looks? That’s Alex’s work. Follow his YouTube channel if you’re looking for that dead mariachi or terrifying calavera look.

Kehlani

CREDIT: @kehlani / Instagram

Yes, Kehlani is best known for her beats, but don’t tell me you don’t scroll through her feed and drool. She is the pansexual beauty icon we need in our lives. Whether her aesthetic is black and white or giant sunflowers everywhere, she’s inspiring us all.

As if you don’t follow @kehlani already.

CREDIT: @kehlani / Instagram

Follow her for that I-should-just-do-whatever-the-f-I-want mood we’re all seeking in 2019. This is your year. Kehlani can help with that.

Patricia Yurena

CREDIT: @patriyu_love / Instagram

Yurena is obviously gorgeous, which might have contributed to her crowning as Miss Spain and Miss World in 2008… and then again as Miss Universe Spain and Miss Universe in 2013. She came out as a lesbian the year after her last crowning, in 2014.

Follow @patriciayurena for femme beauty queen vibes.

CREDIT: @patriciayurena / Instagram

Patricia should be commended for her courage to come out in an industry that so explicitly values beauty for the consumption of men. Her femme vibes are for female consumption.

The Cruelty Free Vanity

CREDIT: @thecrueltyfreevanity / Instagram

Mexicana beauty blogger, Eli, isn’t going to show you the most dramatic makeup art you’ll ever see, but everything she touches is plant-based and not tested on animals. If you’re interested in natural makeup, but can’t afford to drop the dough on everything you see, the CFV will give you an honest taste.

Follow @thecrueltyfreevanity for natural beauty tips that don’t break the bank.

CREDIT: @thecrueltyfreevanity / Instagram

Follow @thecrueltyfreevanity if you’re looking to actually apply a few low-key beauty tips in your life. You can forever opt for a natural look and forever need to double tap Manny Mua’s maravilla posts.

Patricia Velasquez

CREDIT: @wish_muse / Instagram

Patricia Velasquez rose to international stardom as a young woman. She became the first of many titles, including the first indigenous supermodel, the first Latina supermodel and so much more.

After decades in the closet, she came out in a memoir, Straight Walk, in 2014 as an out and proud lesbian.

Follow @TayaBeauty to support her new brand.

CREDIT: @tayabeauty / Instagram

Since then, she’s launched her very own brand that uses rainforest botanicals, no GMOs, no animal testing and no harsh chemicals. Did anyone try these yet? We’re curious.

Karamo Brown

CREDIT: @karamo / Instagram

In the last year alone, Karamo Brown has skyrocketed to fame with Netflix’s reboot of Queer Eye. As the culture expert, you wouldn’t expect him listed as a beauty guru, but who says you can’t be both?

Follow @karamo to see this full package in action.

CREDIT: @karamo / Instagram

The truth is that Brown is the guru of many things. He started out as a model, became a social worker, and then jumped back into the entertainment industry. On Queer Eye and in life, he’s completely open about wearing makeup on the daily and guess what? Men wearing makeup no longer has to be a “statement.” It just is, and for all these people listed, we’re grateful.


READ: 22 LGBTQ+ Latinos Who Are Changing The World

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What PDA Is Like When You’re LGBTQIA+

Entertainment

What PDA Is Like When You’re LGBTQIA+

Elite Daily

Public displays of affection are the common little perks that come with being in a relationship. If you aren’t in a relationship, it can seem kind of mushy but anyone who’s coupled will tell you it’s awesome. Being able to casually hold their hand or lean in for a kiss helps to strengthen the bond you have with your partner. It’s small manifestations of the love they make you feel.

However, not everyone gets to experience this freedom in a relationship. If you’re a member of the LGBTQIA+ community, you know that PDA often works differently for you. It can be more rare — and more precious — because of our social climate. It can also be a validation of your love.

Safety is also something that often sets it apart from straight PDA. Around the globe, even here in the U.S. LGBTQ+ PDA can often be an act of bravery. Whatever the difference, it’s proof that you’re part of the LGBTQIA+ community and that’s important.

We’ve gathered responses from LGBTQIA+ social media users and they gave us some incredible insights on acts of affection.

The need to cautiously avoid danger is one that straight people don’t often feel with PDA.

iStock

“I think that it’s been really hard for me to show any PDA to my girlfriend because there is a factor of ‘what if?’ And recently with so many hate crimes against POC in the LGBTQ+ I have been very cautious. It wasn’t until recently that I have been trying to go outside my comfort zone and hold my girlfriend hand or even put my head on her shoulder. I’m happy about my accomplishments in regards to being more open in public.” — @Angelina.vicenio

There is a trend of queer, femme-presenting PDA being devoured and monetized by outsiders. This writer shared the complexity she feels about this as a bisexual woman.

Swipe Life

“Now that I openly date women and femme-presenting folks, PDA is multi-layered. I still love it, but I can feel our kisses being consumed by cishet men in the vicinity. Sometimes, I can hear them whistling or calling their friends over to watch. I wish they knew that these moments aren’t for them. But queer women are so hypersexualized and fetishized that even seeing two of us on a date is perceived as an invitation.” — Gabrielle Noel, writer

PDA is a struggle if you or your partner aren’t publically out yet.

The Culture Trip

“I’m the mother of a gay son. His BF hasn’t come out yet and they can not show any type of PDA and that frustrates my son so much. They are always in the house and I feel so bad because they are missing out. I live in DC and my neighborhood has many gay couples. Love is love and wherever I go, if I hear someone speak negative about a gay couple showing affection, I shut it down immediately. I try and take my son and his BF to places where they can be themselves, but I also encourage them to be brave and to always stand up for who they are and what they deserve.” — @acro__iris__

When harrassed about PDA, abuse can run the gambit from passive mistreatment to aggressive actions.

NY Times

“Many people in my life don’t clock me as gay so I guess that counts? Once I was holding hands with a guy in downtown Riverside and got yelled “f-ggot” by some dude in a car. One time I was kissing my high school bf and my “friends” threw a hacky sack at our faces.” — @bruhjeria

This Twitter user reminds us that straight people don’t need safe places to be themselves — but LGBTQIA+ people do.

Queerty.com

“Unfortunately, it is hard to engage in minor public displays of affection (hand holding, hugging, small kisses) as a gay person due to mean stares and fears of being attacked. Pride is a safe space for me. Straight people don’t need that type of space to engage in PDA.” — @willygr8tweets

LGBTQIA+ couples are sometimes even forced to hold back during PRIDE — which should be a safe place.

The Culture Trip

“It’s a shame we still have to deal w people telling us we shouldn’t kiss or engage in pda at pride, at OUR safe space, bc it makes them ‘uncomfortable'” — @emmalejenkins_

However, allies and queer people alike still feel warm and fuzzy seeing LGBTQIA+ PDA.

Elite Daily

“Am I the only one who absolutely hates PDA but if it’s a gay/lesbian/queer couple i’m like ((((((-: <333” — @jaydee_cakess

This person reminded us that PDA is a universal right.

iStock

“‘U can be gay all u want but i don’t want to see two guys making out in public, ew’ PDA!!! IS!!! THE!!! SAME!!! DESPITE!!! WHO!!! IS!!! KISSING!!! WHO!!! WHY are two men different than a man and woman showing affection in public?” — @c_alexandraxo

Though there is still so much work to do, this Twitter user pointed out the progress the LGBTQIA+ community has seen.

OnABicycleBuiltForTwo.com

“#LancasterPride shows how far we’ve come. When I first moved here in ‘98, any same-sex PDA had to be checking all directions before gently brushing knuckles. Unless you were at the gay night at The Warehouse. Then you had to practically hump on the dance floor just to say hello.” — @RG_Bhaji

Victoria Cruz Sees Hope For The Future Of LGBTQ+ Rights 50 Years After She Witnessed The Stonewall Riots

Things That Matter

Victoria Cruz Sees Hope For The Future Of LGBTQ+ Rights 50 Years After She Witnessed The Stonewall Riots

iamsamkirk / Instagram

The history of Gay Rights in the country date back to the late ’60s and the epicenter was Manhattan. The core fighters of the LGBTQ community include Marsha P. Johnson, Scott G. Brown, Sylvia Rivera, and a slew of other pioneers. The sad thing is this generation has passed or will very soon, which is why we have to honor their legacy while they’re still alive. One of those people is an inspiring person in our Latinx community.

Victoria Cruz, who is in her 70s, is a survivor of the Stonewall Riots and is still very much a part of the fight for LGBTQ rights.

Instagram/@marinadelbey

Cruz, who was born in Puerto Rico, is one of 11 children that grew up in New York. While Cruz was born a male, she knew since she was in high school that she was a woman. Back in the ’60s, that was no easy thing to admit, yet her Puerto Rican family supported her transition.

While her family and close community were supportive, Cruz faced immense hardships including harassment from the police, and later in the ’90s, she was assaulted.

Instagram/@hispanic_history_

Four of her coworkers physically assaulted her, which left her in ruins.

“I was very angry. Very angry,” Cruz said in an interview with Vanity Fair in 2017. “The worst part of it is that I couldn’t feel the ground beneath me, and added that she was “was contemplating suicide,” at the time.

But she overcame that tough time and is recognized as a leader in the movement for Gay Rights.

Yet, despite the hate and violence she faced, Cruz pushed on standing up for her LGBTQ+ family.

“I used to go to St. Vincent’s on my lunch hour…and I would see her,” Cruz told The Advocate. “She called to me, ‘Victoria, come here.’ And she always called me Dickie, you know, so when she said, ‘Victoria come here,’ I knew that she meant business. I sat down, and she looked at me. She said, ‘Try to keep the community together because we are our own worst enemy. And there’s power in numbers.’ And then she said, ‘The world will come up to try to divide us, and when you divide a community, you conquer it. So try to keep the community together.’”

As a trans woman and pioneer of the LGBTQ movement, Cruz said positive change is happening right now.

Instagram/@florentinoreyes

“I’m optimistic, and I’m hopeful that it will change for the better,” she told The Advocate. “There’s power in numbers. If we unite and keep united, we can make the future different, and what we want it to be. By galvanizing one another, we galvanize each other. And with the same frame of mind, the same frame of thought, we can change what’s happening.”

Trans rights are the new frontier in the LGBTQ+ movement. Despite the contributions made to the movement by trans women of color, cis members of the LGBTQ+ community ignore their plight or add to the harassment.

“There is so much hatred directed toward queer people, particularly transgender women of color. For what? Why? I think it may be about people’s own insecurities about their own identities and sexualities. And further, people don’t know their history,” Cruz told BC/Stories. “The transgender experience isn’t new. It’s as old as the human experience, and anyone who does their research would know this. I think society needs to be educated, and maybe after being educated, empathy will follow.”

READ: Zuri Moreno Made Sure The Trans Community In Montana Remained Safe

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