Entertainment

Latinos Won Big Victories At The Golden Globes Last Night But Our History At The Show Is Too Short

The 2019 Golden Globes have come and gone, and the two things that we learned from the 3-hour long show is that a) Latinos in Hollywood are still very much underrepresented and b) if it wasn’t for Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma” the whole show would have been a much dire situation for Latinos. Cuarón’s film did take home two top-notch awards including Best Motion Picture: Foreign Language, and Best Director.

We didn’t have the Latino representation we had hoped for, it got us to thinking about the Golden Globes of yesteryear. Here are some of those memorable moments of past Latino winners following the new class of Latino Golden Globes winners.

Alfonso Cuarón, “Best Director” for “Roma,” 2019

CREDIT: alfonsocuaron / Instagram

During Cuarón’s acceptance speech, he thanked his leading ladies: “Thank you very much Yalitza Aparicio and Marina de Tavira. We need to begin to understand exactly how much we have in common.” He went on to say: “Cinema at its best…builds bridges to another culture. As we grow these bridges…we begin to realize that while they may be strange, they are not unfamiliar. We begin to understand exactly how much we have in common…This film would have not been possible without the specific colors that make me who I am,” he continued. “Gracias famila y  gracias Mexico.”

“Roma” – Best Motion Pictures: Foreign Language, 2019

CREDIT: romacuaron / Instagram

The film has been the talk of the industry as it has started winning awards shortly before its official release. The lead actress Yalitza Aparicio, an indigenous woman, was the cover of a recent Vogue Mexico magazine making history.

“The Assassination Of Gianni Versace” – Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television, 2019

CREDIT: goldenglobes / Instagram

“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” which featured a Latino cast did win for “Best Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TV.”

Sadly, actor Edgar Ramirez lost for “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television” as did Lin-Manuel Miranda for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy for “Mary Poppins Returns.”

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” – Best Motion Picture: Animated, 2019

CREDIT: spiderversemovie / Instagram

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” centers around Miles Morales, an Afro-Latino Brooklyn teen who is in the fight for his life as he becomes the new Spider-Man. A glithc in a villain’s machine leads to Spider-People for different universes joining him on his fight to save the world and restore order. The movie was produced by Cuban-American writer-producer Phil Lord.

“Coco” – Best Motion Picture: Animated, 2017

CREDIT: pixarcoco / Instagram

“Coco” was an instant classic when Disney/Pixar released the film in 2017. Every Latino in the country knew of the movie and it is the highest-grossing movie of all time in Mexico. The win at last year’s Golden Globes wasn’t a surprise and it made for a great moment in Latino cinematic history.

“Moonlight” – Best Film: Drama, 2017

CREDIT: moonlightmov / Instagram

“Moonlight” was one of the most celebrated films the year it was released as it followed the story of an Afro-Cuban man guiding a young black man through life in Miami. There was some confusion at the Oscars when “La La Land” was accidentally named Best Picture when it was in fact “Moonlight.” They took home the Golden Globe earlier that year for Best Film: Drama.

Alfonso Cuarón – Best Director for “Gravity,” 2014

CREDIT: @TheGravityMovie / Twitter

Alfonso Cuarón is no stranger to the Golden Globes. The “Roma” director won in 2014 with his hit movie “Gravity” starring Sandra Bullock.

Rita Moreno – “Best Supporting Actress” in “West Side Story,” 1962

CREDIT: West Side Story / The Mirisch Corporation

Rita Moreno hit the big screen as Anita in “West Side Story” and made a name for herself as she danced and sang on screen. One of the first historic moments in Latino cinema.

Andy Garcia – “Best Supporting Actor” in “The Godfather Part III,” 1990

CREDIT: The Godfather Part III / Paramount Pictures

The Godfather franchise is one of the most recognizable film franchises in Hollywood history. Not only does Andy Garcia give the character depth, the films saved Paramount Pictures for going under.

Jimmy Smits – “Best Actor in a TV Drama Series” in “NYPD Blue,” 1995

CREDIT: kimdelaney4reel / Instagram

Everyone was talking about this show when it was airing. For good reason, too. The storylines were so intense, it felt like you were part of the story as you watched the characters navigate the scary and hard life as a New York police officer.

Gina Rodriguez – “Best Actress in a TV Series or Comedy” for “Jane the Virgin,” 2015

CREDIT: hereisgina / Instagram

“We can, and we did,” remember those incredible words during her acceptance speech? Gina Rodriguez was tearful when she accpeted the award for her work in the show the gave Latinos depth in the midst of the 2016 presidential election when our community was under attack.

Guillermo Del Toro – “Best Director for a Motion Picture” for “The Shape of Water,” 2017

CREDIT: @RealGDT / Twitter

Guillermo del Toro is one of the most inconic directors of our time. He has created worlds and universes that changed everything we know about the world around us and it is incredible. He has a talent you just can’t teach.

Gael García Bernal – Best Performance By An Actor in a TV Series (Comedy) for “Mozart in the Jungle,” 2016

CREDIT: mitjamazon / Instagram

We loved this show and fans were so bummed when it was canceled in order to create a “Lord of the Rings” show. Bernal is a national treasure for Mexico and his work to push the Mexican film industry is noteworthy.

Alejandro González Iñárritu – Best Director for “The Revenant,” 2016

CREDIT: Golden Globes

Alejandro Iñárritu is one of the most prolific directors of all times. He continues to dominate the award show season whenever he releases a new film.

“The Revenant” – Best Film: Drama, 2016

CREDIT: The Revenant / 20th Century Fox / YouTube

“The Revenant” was so brutal to watch but cinematic for sure. There is no question why this movie deserved the awards it won during its year. Iñárritu has really made himself know.

Oscar Isaac -Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television for “Show Me a Hero,” 2016

CREDIT: Show Mw A Hero / HBO

Oscar Isaac has been a household name for us for a very long time. Him winning awards for his work seems like a no-brainer.

Benicio del Toro – “Best Supporting Actor” for “Traffic,” 2000

CREDIT: beniciodeltoro.fans / Instagram

We loved Benicio Del Toro in “Traffic.” Who didn’t? He was the character and we were all better for having watched the film.

Alejandro Iñárritu – “Best Motion Picture” for “Babel,” 2006

CREDIT: Babel / Paramount Pictures

Did you watch “Babel”? Such a hard-hitting film, which we need more of today. The way one event imapcts the lives of so many people around the world is incredible.

America Ferrera – Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Series for “Ugly Betty,” 2007

CREDIT: americaferrera / Instagram

“Ugly Betty” was America Ferrera’s breakthrough role, there’s no doubt. The love and admiration fans showred on the show made for a longlasting career for Ferrera.

Javier Bardem – Best Supporting Actor for “No Country for Old Men,” 2007

CREDIT: bardemantarctic / Instagram

We need more Javier Bardem ASAP, tbh. When can we see this man on screen again?


READ: Here’s Why Sofia Vergara’s Golden Globes Joke Rubbed People The Wrong Way

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The Stars of “Real Housewives of Dallas” Have Split The Internet Into Two Camps Following a Drama-Filled Episode That Ended in a Xenophobic Rant

Entertainment

The Stars of “Real Housewives of Dallas” Have Split The Internet Into Two Camps Following a Drama-Filled Episode That Ended in a Xenophobic Rant

Dallas

We’d be lying to ourselves if we didn’t admit that we love to indulge in some good, old-fashioned reality TV drama just as much as the next person. Luckily for us, Wednesday’s episode of Real Housewives of Dallas offered us just that. And this time, the drama centered around RHOD’s primadonna LeeAnne Locken and RHOD’s first cast member of Mexican descent, Kary Brittingham. 

For those of you who don’t know, Brittingham is a wealthy Dallas socialite who moved to Dallas from Guadalajara at the age of 16. She is married to Eduardo Brittingham, a Mexican-American millionaire, and entrepreneur who founded a company called Tu Familia, a “social media engagement app platform which connects and empowers Latino communities globally”. 

Episode 12 of Season Four saw the ladies taking an impromptu trip to Thailand. The trip was meant to be a relaxing learning experience for everyone, but of course, nothing can ever be relaxing in the Real Housewives world. Locken and Brittingham immediately began to butt heads over arbitrary tourism “rules” of Thailand–specifically, the expectation that visitors take off their hats when entering a Buddhist temple. 

The drama reached another level, however when Brittingham and fellow cast member D’Andra Simmons went out of their way to publicly mock Locken’s business venture, her L’Infinity dress.

For those of you who aren’t aware, last season, Locken debuted a dress she designed that she was incredibly proud of, the L’Infinity dress, which, according to her, could be worn in 175 different ways. Sensing a potentially hilarious opportunity, Simmons brought the dress with her to Thailand in order to wear to dinner. When Brittingham and Simmons arrived at dinner, they claimed that their tardiness was due to how much they struggled with putting the dress on. 

“We had a little wardrobe malfunction. This is all coming apart,” Simmons said while sitting down. While at first, her ensemble was met with exclamations of “How cute!” and “That dress looks gorgeous on you!” from the rest of the cast members, the mood quickly changed as the women began to realize that Simmons wasn’t wearing it from a place of support. Brittingham piled on with the criticism, adding selling the dress with “an instruction booklet…with pictures” would be “super helpful”.

While Locken first tried to brush off the teasing, she soon snapped, leaving the dinner table in tears. 

While being privately interviewed, later on, Locken explained the origins of her frustration: “If it’s a ‘joke’, you come down, you make it, you move on,” she said. “If you keep going because you haven’t gotten a reaction from me, it’s because you did it to get a reaction from me”. Indeed, it wasn’t only Locken who were a bit turned off by the ladies’ incessant teasing. “There’s a difference between a joke and a joke at someone’s expense”, Stephanie Hollman said later. “What they’re doing is, it’s a joke and LeeAnne’s a punchline, and that’s not cool.”

To make matters worse, the entire fiasco culminated in LeeAnne totally losing it and verbally attacking Brittingham due to her Mexican heritage. As part of the episode’s conclusion, as well as the preview for the next episode, we see Locken venting her frustration to Hollman, saying that Brittingham doesn’t “have the balls to be courageous” and admit that wearing the dress was coming from a place of malice. Talking about it, Locken becomes visibly more and more enraged, hitting herself in the face and saying, “C’mon Mexican, I thought you were all Mexican and strong. F*** that b****. You ain’t survive s***. And I’m tired of it”.

After Wednesday’s episode fans of RHOD were firmly divided into two camps: those of Locken’s side and those on Brittingham and Simmons’ side.

Others believed that Locken couldn’t justify why came off as a pretty racist rant at the end of the episode.

Some people couldn’t get past what they saw as Locken’s pretty racist rant at the end of the episode.

Others truly believed Brittingham and Simmons went too far and crossed the line into “bullying” territory. 

It’s interesting how starkly different people feel about the same situation.

This person called out Locken for her, frankly, xenophobic behavior:

Making fun of Brittingham’s perfectly understandable English is icky.

And this person seemed personally aggrieved at Brittingham and Simmons’ “prank”.

As for us, we believe all of the women involved could benefit from an intense session or two of therapy. 

As Disney+ Launches, Here Are Some Of The Offensive Movies And Scenes You Might Or Might Not See On The Platform

Entertainment

As Disney+ Launches, Here Are Some Of The Offensive Movies And Scenes You Might Or Might Not See On The Platform

Disney

On November 12th, Disney launched its much-anticipated streaming service Disney+, a platform that offers over 7,000 television episodes and 500 films of Disney titles to its subscribers. And while the influx of beloved Disney content is exciting, some Disney fans can’t help but cringe at the outdated, stereotypical tropes that some of the House of Mouse’s older content employed. And while racist tropes and offensive stereotypes were par for the course decades ago, we are now living in a world where sensitive cultural representation in the media is of the utmost importance. 

Aware of people’s lowered tolerance for racism in their entertainment, Disney+ has issued content warnings on some of their titles. The warning reads: “This program is presented as originally created. It may contain outdated cultural depictions”. And while some are applauding Disney for acknowledging the problematic nature of some of their content, others don’t think that a mere content warning is enough. Others are calling for Disney to make a greater effort to reckon with their problematic legacy. In light of these development, here are seven of the most racist moments in Disney movies that you can look out for when deciding on your next Disney+ viewing.

1. The Siamese Cats in “Lady and the Tramp”

@lcrowde8/Twitter

When “Lady and the Tramp” was released in 1955, it wasn’t unusual for the entertainment industry to create characters based on offensive stereotypes of what they believed people of Asian descent acted like. One of the most offensive instances of this were there characters “Si” and “Am” in “Lady and the Tramp”–two mischievous and troublesome cats who come into Lady’s home and make a mess, which Lady is ultimately blamed for. It doesn’t help that the cats are illustrated with slanted eyes and sing with broken accents. 

2. Everything about “Song of the South”

@multiverse/Twitter

Probably the most offensive and problematic of all Disney movies, “Song of the South” was released in 1946. It follows the story of a young boy who befriends Uncle Remus, a former slave who teaches him about life through a series of fables. The movie is upsetting for many reasons, one of which is the way the movie expresses nostalgia for the pre-Civil War way of life–which even the movie’s black characters seem to long for. The song “Song of the South” is the perfect example of this, where a black choir sings, “This heart of mine is in the heart of Dixie. That’s where I belong”. 

3. The Crows in “Dumbo”

@lcrowde8/Twitter

The crows in “Dumbo” are a play on blackface minstrel characters that much of the American audience would’ve been familiar with at the time of “Dumbo”‘s release in 1941. To add insult to injury, the character of Jim Crow (yes, that’s actually his name), was voiced by white actor Cliff Edwards, voicing an exaggerated version of a stereotypical black Southern voice. In “Dumbo”, Jim is depicted as lazy, dumb, and indulgent. This offensive stereotype of black people was well-known in the South. 

4. Sunflower in “Fantasia”

@WookieJohn/Twitter

In the original “Fantasia” released in 1940, the movie features a little black character named Sunflower. Sunflower was a black little girl with the body of a donkey. She was drawn with dark skin, an over-exaggerated nose and lips and braids in her hair. From her brief appearance in the movie, her apparent purpose in life was to help the glamorous white centaurs with their beauty routine (she was shown as filing the nails of a centaur). In later version, her character was cropped out completely of the movie to avoid a public outcry. 

5. “What Makes a Red Man Red?” in “Peter Pan”

@WookieJohn/Twitter

The racism inherent in “Peter Pan” is laid out plainly in the song “What Makes a Red Man Red?” that Neverland’s tribe of Native Americans sings to explain their history to the Lost Boys. The song is meant to be the origin story of how Native Americans got their skin color. The lyrics are as follows: “Let’s go back a million years/To the very first Injun prince/He kissed a maid and start to blush/And we’ve all been blushin’ since”. 

6. “Arabian Nights” in “Aladdin”

@alexcornett93/Twitter

Critics of “Aladdin” have long called the movie problematic for the way it depicts people of Middle Eastern descent and how it fails to illustrate the differences between various Middle Eastern cultures. Instead, the Kingdom of Agraba is a mish-mash of various cultures of the Middle East which implies that the cultures are interchangeable. And don’t forget the most problematic pat of the movie, the song “Arabian Nights” that contains the following lyrics: “I come from a land…Where they cut off your ear if they don’t like your face. It’s barbaric, but hey, it’s home”.

7. Shun Gon in “The Aristocats”

@squam0/Twitter

The Chinese cat Shun Gon in “The Aristocats” is another prime example of a racist character that Disney employed in their earlier movies. Shun Gon is a member of O’Malley the Alley Cat’s street gang. He speaks in broken English, has slanted eyes and prominent teeth, and plays the piano with chopsticks. In other words, it doesn’t get more offensive that this.