Entertainment

Latinos Won Big Victories At The Golden Globes Last Night But Our History At The Show Is Too Short

The 2019 Golden Globes have come and gone, and the two things that we learned from the 3-hour long show is that a) Latinos in Hollywood are still very much underrepresented and b) if it wasn’t for Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma” the whole show would have been a much dire situation for Latinos. Cuarón’s film did take home two top-notch awards including Best Motion Picture: Foreign Language, and Best Director.

We didn’t have the Latino representation we had hoped for, it got us to thinking about the Golden Globes of yesteryear. Here are some of those memorable moments of past Latino winners following the new class of Latino Golden Globes winners.

Alfonso Cuarón, “Best Director” for “Roma,” 2019

CREDIT: alfonsocuaron / Instagram

During Cuarón’s acceptance speech, he thanked his leading ladies: “Thank you very much Yalitza Aparicio and Marina de Tavira. We need to begin to understand exactly how much we have in common.” He went on to say: “Cinema at its best…builds bridges to another culture. As we grow these bridges…we begin to realize that while they may be strange, they are not unfamiliar. We begin to understand exactly how much we have in common…This film would have not been possible without the specific colors that make me who I am,” he continued. “Gracias famila y  gracias Mexico.”

“Roma” – Best Motion Pictures: Foreign Language, 2019

CREDIT: romacuaron / Instagram

The film has been the talk of the industry as it has started winning awards shortly before its official release. The lead actress Yalitza Aparicio, an indigenous woman, was the cover of a recent Vogue Mexico magazine making history.

“The Assassination Of Gianni Versace” – Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television, 2019

CREDIT: goldenglobes / Instagram

“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” which featured a Latino cast did win for “Best Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TV.”

Sadly, actor Edgar Ramirez lost for “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television” as did Lin-Manuel Miranda for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy for “Mary Poppins Returns.”

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” – Best Motion Picture: Animated, 2019

CREDIT: spiderversemovie / Instagram

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” centers around Miles Morales, an Afro-Latino Brooklyn teen who is in the fight for his life as he becomes the new Spider-Man. A glithc in a villain’s machine leads to Spider-People for different universes joining him on his fight to save the world and restore order. The movie was produced by Cuban-American writer-producer Phil Lord.

“Coco” – Best Motion Picture: Animated, 2017

CREDIT: pixarcoco / Instagram

“Coco” was an instant classic when Disney/Pixar released the film in 2017. Every Latino in the country knew of the movie and it is the highest-grossing movie of all time in Mexico. The win at last year’s Golden Globes wasn’t a surprise and it made for a great moment in Latino cinematic history.

“Moonlight” – Best Film: Drama, 2017

CREDIT: moonlightmov / Instagram

“Moonlight” was one of the most celebrated films the year it was released as it followed the story of an Afro-Cuban man guiding a young black man through life in Miami. There was some confusion at the Oscars when “La La Land” was accidentally named Best Picture when it was in fact “Moonlight.” They took home the Golden Globe earlier that year for Best Film: Drama.

Alfonso Cuarón – Best Director for “Gravity,” 2014

CREDIT: @TheGravityMovie / Twitter

Alfonso Cuarón is no stranger to the Golden Globes. The “Roma” director won in 2014 with his hit movie “Gravity” starring Sandra Bullock.

Rita Moreno – “Best Supporting Actress” in “West Side Story,” 1962

CREDIT: West Side Story / The Mirisch Corporation

Rita Moreno hit the big screen as Anita in “West Side Story” and made a name for herself as she danced and sang on screen. One of the first historic moments in Latino cinema.

Andy Garcia – “Best Supporting Actor” in “The Godfather Part III,” 1990

CREDIT: The Godfather Part III / Paramount Pictures

The Godfather franchise is one of the most recognizable film franchises in Hollywood history. Not only does Andy Garcia give the character depth, the films saved Paramount Pictures for going under.

Jimmy Smits – “Best Actor in a TV Drama Series” in “NYPD Blue,” 1995

CREDIT: kimdelaney4reel / Instagram

Everyone was talking about this show when it was airing. For good reason, too. The storylines were so intense, it felt like you were part of the story as you watched the characters navigate the scary and hard life as a New York police officer.

Gina Rodriguez – “Best Actress in a TV Series or Comedy” for “Jane the Virgin,” 2015

CREDIT: hereisgina / Instagram

“We can, and we did,” remember those incredible words during her acceptance speech? Gina Rodriguez was tearful when she accpeted the award for her work in the show the gave Latinos depth in the midst of the 2016 presidential election when our community was under attack.

Guillermo Del Toro – “Best Director for a Motion Picture” for “The Shape of Water,” 2017

CREDIT: @RealGDT / Twitter

Guillermo del Toro is one of the most inconic directors of our time. He has created worlds and universes that changed everything we know about the world around us and it is incredible. He has a talent you just can’t teach.

Gael García Bernal – Best Performance By An Actor in a TV Series (Comedy) for “Mozart in the Jungle,” 2016

CREDIT: mitjamazon / Instagram

We loved this show and fans were so bummed when it was canceled in order to create a “Lord of the Rings” show. Bernal is a national treasure for Mexico and his work to push the Mexican film industry is noteworthy.

Alejandro González Iñárritu – Best Director for “The Revenant,” 2016

CREDIT: Golden Globes

Alejandro Iñárritu is one of the most prolific directors of all times. He continues to dominate the award show season whenever he releases a new film.

“The Revenant” – Best Film: Drama, 2016

CREDIT: The Revenant / 20th Century Fox / YouTube

“The Revenant” was so brutal to watch but cinematic for sure. There is no question why this movie deserved the awards it won during its year. Iñárritu has really made himself know.

Oscar Isaac -Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television for “Show Me a Hero,” 2016

CREDIT: Show Mw A Hero / HBO

Oscar Isaac has been a household name for us for a very long time. Him winning awards for his work seems like a no-brainer.

Benicio del Toro – “Best Supporting Actor” for “Traffic,” 2000

CREDIT: beniciodeltoro.fans / Instagram

We loved Benicio Del Toro in “Traffic.” Who didn’t? He was the character and we were all better for having watched the film.

Alejandro Iñárritu – “Best Motion Picture” for “Babel,” 2006

CREDIT: Babel / Paramount Pictures

Did you watch “Babel”? Such a hard-hitting film, which we need more of today. The way one event imapcts the lives of so many people around the world is incredible.

America Ferrera – Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Series for “Ugly Betty,” 2007

CREDIT: americaferrera / Instagram

“Ugly Betty” was America Ferrera’s breakthrough role, there’s no doubt. The love and admiration fans showred on the show made for a longlasting career for Ferrera.

Javier Bardem – Best Supporting Actor for “No Country for Old Men,” 2007

CREDIT: bardemantarctic / Instagram

We need more Javier Bardem ASAP, tbh. When can we see this man on screen again?


READ: Here’s Why Sofia Vergara’s Golden Globes Joke Rubbed People The Wrong Way

Did you watch this year’s Golden Globes? Let us know by sharing this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Latina Actresses Are Pivoting to Directing and Producing In Order to Get More Latinx Stories Told

Entertainment

Latina Actresses Are Pivoting to Directing and Producing In Order to Get More Latinx Stories Told

Credit: EVALONGORIA/AMERICAFERRERA/INSTAGRAM ; KEVIN WINTER/GETTY

The numbers are bleak. Latinos make up 18% of America’s population but only 5% of the number of speaking roles in movies in 2019 according to the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative.

Hollywood seems to be late to the party when it comes to Latino representation onscreen. But luckily, there are a handful of Latino artists and creators out there who are taking the fight to appear in front of the screen to behind the camera.

Take, for example, Eva Longoria, who was just announced to be directing and co-starring in the new action-comedy film, “Spa Day”

This marks the third movie the Mexican-American actress will be helming and the first Latina to ever direct more than one major studio film.

The other films on Longoria’s roster include a vehicle for her and Kerry Washington tentatively titled “24/7”, as well as the upcoming biopic “Flamin’ Hot”–a movie centered around Richard Montañez, the man who invented Flaming Hot Cheetos.

Longoria has been candid about how the decision to move into directing and producing has been a strategic one.

“One of the reasons I went into producing and directing was I wasn’t going to sit back and wait for somebody to create a role I wanted to do,” Longoria told Variety in 2018.

“You can’t just sit around waiting for [good projects], and I wanted to create that — not just for myself but for other Latinas.”

But her career transition isn’t unique as a Latina in Hollywood. She has joined the ranks of other Latinas in Hollywood who have began to produce and direct their own projects in order to finally see Latino stories told on screen.

Her peers include Jennifer Lopez (“Shades of Blue“, “Hustlers“), Selena Gomez (“Living Undocumented“), America Ferrera (“Gentefied“, “Superstore“), Gina Rodriguez (“Diary of an American President,” “Carmen San Diego“), and Salma Hayek (“Ugly Betty”).

All of these women have thrown their weight behind projects that otherwise wouldn’t be made if their names weren’t attached to them.

All of these women are creating stories that feature Latino stories and Latino talent–in front of and behind the camera.

America Ferrera explained the reason behind her conscious career pivot from acting to directing/producing: “My genuine heart’s desire is to tell stories that haven’t been told,” she told CBS This Morning. “It’s hard to get stories about people like us made. And then to get those stories told by us is very very uncommon.”

Although the endgame is to have Latinx stories greenlit without having to first be a famous singer or actress, the work these ladies are doing might be laying the foundation for an easier road for future industry players of Latino descent. Or as Longoria so eloquently put it: “If we unite and create opportunities for each other and pull each other up, there could be a lot more success for representation on TV.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Report Shows That Immigration Narratives On TV Are Latinx-Focused And Over-Emphasize Crime

Entertainment

Report Shows That Immigration Narratives On TV Are Latinx-Focused And Over-Emphasize Crime

The media advocacy group Define American recently released a study that focused on the way immigrant characters are depicted on television. The second-annual study is entitled “Change the Narrative, Change the World”.

Although the study reports progress in some areas of onscreen representation, there is still a long way to go.

For example, the study reported that half of the immigrant characters depicted on television are Latino, which is consistent with reality. What is not consistent with reality, however, is how crime-related storylines are still an overrepresented theme in these storylines.

The study shows that on television 22% of immigrant characters have crime storylines show up as part of their narratives. These types of storylines further pedal the false narrative that immigrants are criminals, when in reality, they’re just everyday people who are trying to lives their best lives. Ironically, this statistic is an improvement on the previous year’s statistics in which crime themes made up 34% of immigrants’ stories on TV.

These numbers are further proof that the media feels stories of Latino immigration have to be about sadness and hardship in order to be worth watching.

According to Define American’s website, their organization believes that “powerful storytelling is the catalyst that can reshape our country’s immigration narrative and generate significant cultural change.”

They believe that changing the narratives depicted in entertainment media can “reshape our country’s immigration narrative and generate significant cultural change.” 

“We wanted to determine if seeing the specific immigration storylines influenced [viewers’] attitudes, behavior, or knowledge in the real world,” said Sarah Lowe, the associate director of research and impact at Define American to Variety. “And we were reassured and inspired to see the impact it had.” 

Define American’s founder, Jose Antonio Vargas, is relatively optimistic about the study’s outcomes, saying that the report has “some promising findings” and the numbers “provide [him] with hope”. He added that there are still “many areas in which immigrant representation can improve”.

via Getty Images

Namely, Vargas was disappointed in television’s failure to take an intersectional approach to immigration in regards to undocumented Black immigrants. 

“Black undocumented immigrants are detained and deported at higher rates than other ethnic groups,” Vargas told Variety. “But their stories are largely left off-screen and left out of the larger narrative around immigration.” 

“Change the Narrative, Change the World” also showed that Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants are also under-represented on television compared with reality. Also worth noting, male immigrants were over-represented on television compared to reality, while immigrants with disabilities were also under-represented.

The study also showed that when viewers are exposed to TV storylines that humanize immigrants, they’re more likely to take action on immigration issues themselves. 

The effect that fictional entertainment narratives have on viewers further proves that representation does, indeed, matter. What we watch as entertainment changes the way we think about other people’s lived experiences. And that, in turn, can change the world.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com