Entertainment

These Latinos Are Making A Name For Themselves In The Makeup Guru World And There’s No Question Why

The Makeup game is definitely not just for women anymore. Since a few years ago we’ve been seeing an increasing number of male beauty influencers on social media. The speedy rise of this movement has even made major beauty companies start partnering with them. Such is the case for brands like Maybelline, Covergirl and MAC Cosmetics. So, now that Beauty Boys are breaking down gender norm in mainstream media we decided to create a list of 10 Latino beauty boys who are rocking the beauty scene.

1. Manny Gutierrez

Credit: Instagram @mannymua733

At only 27 Manny MUA has grown to be one of the most successful “Beauty Boys“ out there. Before becoming the big star he is today, he planned to become a plastic surgeon. But everything changes after he decided to start his own YouTube channel back in 2014.

Credit: Instagram @mannymua733

Last year he partnered with Maybelline to promote the Colossal Big Shot Mascara alongside fellow beauty guru, Shayla Mitchell. This partnership made him the first male ambassador for the brand and the second one ever, after James Charles partnered with Covergirl. Since then he has been working on his own makeup brand, Lunar Beauty. And just this June he launched his 1st product ever, the “Life’s a Drag Palette“ ($45) with 14 different color shades that go from a matte to glitter, to a satin finish.

2. Ariel Tejada

Credit: Instagram @makeupbyariel

Ariel is best known for being Kylie Jenner makeup artist. He reached instant success at only 19 when Kylie found him on Instagram and personally DM him to work together. After securing her role as her personal makeup artist, he started working with the rest of the Kardashian-Jenner clan and some other celebs like Chrissie Teigen, Naya Rivera, and Lily Ghalichi.

Credit: Instagram @makeupbyariel

He is responsible for some of the most liked Instagram pictures of the Kardashian-Jenner sisters, like the notorious “Cool Mom“ look Kylie rocked at Coachella this year and Kim’s amazing Selena Quintanilla look from last Halloween. Ariel says that working with Kylie is a team effort as they both actively participate during the makeup process, to a point where Kylie doesn’t let anyone do her lips but herself.

3. Angel Merino

Credit: Instagram @Mac_daddyy

Angel is a Los Angeles based celebrity makeup artist and entrepreneur. His big break came after he was hired as a makeup artist for the HGTV network. He then started to transition into fashion makeup and eventually met his first celeb client, Christina Milian at a BeautyCon. After a doing his thing for a while, his celeb portfolio started to grow to include names like Ariana Grande, Mel B, Christina Milian and Toni Braxton. And in 2016, he was chosen to partner up with Macy’s for a National Campaign to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Credit: Instagram @Mac_daddyy

Today, aside from having an enviable celebrity clientele and a huge social media following, he’s also is the creative director and CEO of Artist Couture, a vegan brand that creates a wide variety of loose powder highlighters ($27). He also has partnered up with PUR Cosmetics to create a 5 eye polish collection.

4. Gabriel Zamora

Credit: Instagram @gabrielzamora

If you want to up your makeup game then you better follow Gabriel Zamora. Gabriel’s first big step towards becoming who he is today was when Lilly Ghalichi made him social media coordinator for her brand, Lilly Lashes. During his time working with Lilly, he was able to drastically increase his audience across his social media channels. Up until today, he’s one of the few beauty gurus that has created content in both English and Spanish.

Credit: Instagram @gabrielzamora

Today he’s best known for being the first ever male makeup artist to sign with Michelle Phan’s beauty community, Ipsy as an in-house stylist. And just like Manny MUA and James Charles, he breaking the gender barrier and crossing over to mainstream media. Gabriel success allowed him to partner up with MAC Cosmetics in 2017 to launch a Limited Edition nude lipstick.

5. Ariel Diaz

Credit: Instagram @theevanitydiary

This 25-year-old makeup artists from Palm Beach describes himself as a cosmetic illusionist and he’s definitely NOT lying. Ariel’s crazy transformations from Queen B to Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe to Kim K are beyond INCREDIBLE. If you take a look at his Instagram account you’ll see that he nails it every single time!

Credit: Instagram @theevanitydiary

Before being a makeup artist, Ariel was a painter who used actual makeup brushes as tools to create his work. Then one year he decided to help his mom with some Halloween makeup for her work and it was then when he realized that’s what he wanted to do. Now, after years of creating celebrity-inspired looks, he has an incredible fan base with over half a million followers on Instagram.

6. Etienne Ortega

Credit: Instagram @etienneortega

Before living in the US and becoming a celebrity and fashion makeup artist, Etienne grew up in a small town in Jalisco, Mexico. Then he moved to California to study at The Paul Mitchell School and soon after that start working at a salon in Beverly Hills. This opportunity and his ever-growing fan base on social media allowed him to be discovered on Instagram by Kim Kardashian a few years later.

Credit: Instagram @etienneortega

Since then he has worked the Kardashian sisters, Kris Jenner, Paris Hilton, Nicky Minaj, Demi Lovato. Eva Longoria and Christina Aguilera, in fact, he’s responsible for Aguilera’s look on RuPaul’s Drag Race Season 10. Aside from being the go-to guy of several A-list celebs, you can also see his work on several magazines like Vogue, People, Glamour, and Allure.

7. Zachary Domingo

Credit: Instagram @barbiegutz

This 19-year-old Puertorican-Filipino star goes by the name of BarbieGutz. Zachary is a makeup artist, stylist, and designer with his own sense of aesthetic. He started back in 2011 when he created his YouTube channel at only 12 years old, in which he gives fashion advice, makeup tutorials and even some hairstyle tips.

Credit: Instagram @barbiegutz

Zachary also has a few fashion businesses on the side. He started his own brand and he sells his designs at his online shop, which include hats, hoodies, t-shirts and tank tops. Also, he sells the clothing you see him wearing in his Instagram posts through the Depop app.

8. José Davalos

Credit: Instagram @Jooskellington

Jose is s special effects and makeup artist from Guadalajara, Mexico. Even though he’s not a “Beauty Boy“ he’s on this list because his makeup skills deserve a MAJOR shoutout. This Comicon superstar’s repertoire includes the biggest selection of Disney characters you can possibly imagine including Ursula, The Beast, Maleficent, Scar, Davy Jones, Cruella De Vil, Hades, Jack Skellington, and even Lumiere (Yes, the freakin’ candlestick!!).

Credit: Instagram @Jooskellington

But that’s not all, this makeup whiz earned a scholarship in California and while there he decided to start competing in makeup contests like ComicCon and Monsterpalooza. He has even participated in a few Indie films. And if you’re not a fan of Disney, don’t worry he has a lot of more characters from movies like Star Wars, The Grinch, and even Scooby Doo. If you haven’t checked out his Instagram account I urge you to do it NOW… you won’t be disappointed!

9. Alex Rivera

Credit: Instagram @alexfaction

Just as Joo, Alex is not what you call your everyday makeup guru. He started back when he graduated cosmetology school and moved to work at a salon in a small town in Illinois. During that time he began to practice his craft and eventually decided to create his YouTube channel. He initially started as a fashion and bridal makeup artist but with time he became more interested in theatrical makeup and optical illusion.

Credit: Instagram @alexfaction

As he was looking to challenge himself and recreate what he thought was impossible. This has allowed him to garner over 400,000 followers on social media and has even got the chance to work with Jennifer Lopez on some Halloween makeup. But that’s no surprise when you take a look at his work. You’ll find all kinds of makeup tutorials from skeleton kings and dead mariachis to flower vines and every day looks.

10. Edgars Makeup

Credit: Instagram @edgarsmakeup

Looking for new makeup ideas? Then Edgar is who you want to be following. His makeup tutorials are a great source of inspiration for a night on the town or any special events you might have.

Credit: Instagram @edgarsmakeup

But that’s not all, aside from rocking those eyeshadow pallets, he’s also a whiz when it comes to hiding any scars and redness on the face.

From Spain To Latin America, How A Mass Migration Created A Thriving Latino/Jewish Community

Culture

From Spain To Latin America, How A Mass Migration Created A Thriving Latino/Jewish Community

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The days of stereotyping Latinos are over, dead to 2019. We are an ethnicity, not a race, which means we have every range of skin tone and practice every major religion. The arc of Latinidad is so entrenched in imperialism and immigration that it makes sense we would be so diverse. To be Latino has often meant being a native Latin American indigenous person or ancestry that, at some point, hailed from somewhere else in the world and landed in Latin America. The Spanish Inquisition is largely responsible for the present-day stereotype of Catholic Latinos, but the Inquisition is responsible for the mass immigration of Spanish Jews as well. During the 16th century, the Inquisition mandated that all Jews convert to Catholicism. Many of them did and were known as conversos, but many of them continued to practice their religion in secret, becoming known as crypto-Jews. The rest were expelled from the country and would eventually make their way to Latin America.

Today, an estimated half-million Jews live in Latin America, with Argentina having the second-largest Jewish community in the Americas, at an estimated 300,000 total. 

Studies have revealed that almost 25 percent of Latinos have Jewish DNA.

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Immigration has long been the defining mark of non-Indigenous Latinos. Historians have long wondered how many descendants were produced from those original Jews expelled from Spain to Latin America. What’s more interesting is understanding that conversos offered a whole other lineage of people with Jewish heritage hatefully stamped out by an empire–an erasure of identity that can now be found through genetics research. A Nature Communications study from December 2018 has concluded, based on the research of dozens of professors around the globe, that 25 percent of Latinos have Spanish or Portuguese Jewish DNA. Today, 20% of the 60 million people in the Iberian peninsula have significant Jewish ancestry. Researchers suspect that the total number of descendants of Spanish and Portuguese Jewish communities range in the 200 million.

In a world without anti-Semitism, would Latinos be more widely known as Jewish because their ancestors weren’t forcibly converted?

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Given the shocking estimates, it seems likely that there could have been as many as 1 in 4 Jews in the Latino community. In Miami Dade County, a third of all Jews identify as Latino Jews, and many Latino-American Jews have begun advocating for their Latino culture within the Jewish community. “[Although we] don’t generally inhabit the same spaces, we have to come together and become aware of the commonalities, the linguistic, cultural and historical ties the two communities have. Latino Jews could play an important role in being the link between Jews and Latinos, so what we’re trying to do is create more and more spaces for this interaction and cooperation to happen,” Dina Siegel Vann, Director of Latino Affairs at the American Jewish Committee told Aish.com.

Even though anti-Semitism and radical political ideology have erased the Jewish heritage that could have been passed down to the existing Latino population with Jewish DNA, many Jewish customs and traditions have prevailed in Latino culture without due credit. Por ejemplo.

Puerto Rican Sofrito came from the Sephardic Jews.

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That’s right my fellow Boricuas, sofrito might be the ultimate symbol and base of our cuisine, but Spanish Jews had long been using the garlic, onion, pepper, tomatoes, cumin, and olive oil base salsa to slow-cook chicken, veal, beef or lamb by Spanish Sephardic Jews. In fact, we owe it to the Sephardic Jews who were expelled from Spain during the Spanish Inquisition for bringing their recipes with them. Their cultural influence made an impact on Spanish cuisine, which then had a ripple effect on Latin America as it became colonized by Spain. Originally, sofrito was most often celebrated in the Balkans, the Levant, Turkey, and the Maghreb before making its way to become a Puerto Rican staple. Whatever you decide to make for your Hanukkah meal, including sofrito is a no-brainer crowd pleaser.  

Lachmazikas, a meat-stuffed pastry, is quite similar to empanadas.

CREDIT: UNTITLED. DIGITAL IMAGE. TABLETMAG. 20 DECEMBER 2019.

While most Latino-Americans are unified in speaking Spanglish, Latino Jews speak Ladino. Israeli Jews delight in sufganiyot, while American Jews often see it as an afterthought, just a jelly-filled donut. Spanish Jews made lachmazikas, which were filled with everything from lamb and mushrooms to ricotta, herbs, and whitefish. A meat stuffed bread might sound familiar to you *cough* empanadillas *cough*.

Looking for more Latino-Jewish foods for your Hanukkah celebration? Look no further.

READ: Disney Is Debuting Their First Jewish Princess And Surprise! She’s Also Latina

Traditional Christmas Latino Meals And The History Behind Them

Culture

Traditional Christmas Latino Meals And The History Behind Them

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Latinos have played an pivotal role in American cuisine since the very beginning. But the wealth and complexity of Latin food traditions goes far beyond Taco Tuesdays and happy hour margaritas. Each Latin American country boasts its own unique  flavors, and while several of the same dishes exist in different forms throughout North, South, and Central America, each culture’s recipes are distinctly its own. The real beauty about Latin cuisine in the US is that these distinct cultural identities all have their place in our country’s vast gastronomic canon, maintaining their original shape while also merging into a stunning mezcla of vibrant new culinary customs.

While family tradition is super important in the Latino kitchen—with recipes being passed down from generation to generation—many old school dishes are being adapted in lieu of modern culinary trends.

And this makes sense. From food to music to fashion, cultural exchange is how new innovations and creative ideas come to life. But it is especially common in the realm of cuisine—we need food to survive, after all, and we are always seeking new ways to make this basic necessity a bit more interesting and enjoyable. In places like the US, where countless cultures coexist and overlap, it’s inevitable that different culinary traditions would borrow from each other and coalesce to make something totally fresh and distinct.

So what are some of the most classic Latino food traditions? How have they morphed and changed over time? And how have they stayed the same?

Tamales

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Tamales are a quintessential dish in many Latin American countries, though they differ from place to place. Yet the tradition of preparing tamales communally and collaboratively stands the test of both time and geography, as it is so often a group effort guided by la abuela’s magical, age-old tamale skills. With ancient Mesoamerican origins, the tamale will always be the root of blossoming Latinx cuisine—there’s nothing like the smell of steam rising from the tamalera and filling la cocina with goodness. They are the ultimate comfort food, and they’ve maintained their integrity, as they are too classic to change in any major sense. And the best way to eat tamales? With a steamy cup of champurrado in hand.

Guacamole

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Guacamole is a beloved concoction all over the world, though it originated in South Central Mexico several thousand years ago. Over time, it evolved from a prized Aztec dish to a ubiquitous and highly coveted snack that—in the US, anyway—spikes in popularity during certain events, like the Superbowl. Because of its simplicity, guacamole serves as a canvas for culinary creativity, with several different incarnations since its original blend of avocados, herbs, and spices. With guacamole, there opportunities to experiment are truly endless.

Micheladas

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The michelada has also evolved into a canvas of sorts, inviting people to create elaborate versions of this classic Mexican drink. Similar to the popular Bloody Mary, micheladas can sometimes serve as a whole meal, with entire salads floating atop the base of spicy, salty beer. Often, different types of mariscos are added, from shrimp to crab legs to octopus to oysters. Sometimes the michelada is adorned with varias frutas, like watermelon, pineapple, or blackberries. And occasionally, micheladas llevan all of the above! Like guacamole, the possibilities son infinitos.

Ceviche

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Some version of ceviche is made all over Latin America, but it is widely believed to originate in Peru—it is certainly synonymous with Peruvian cuisine, and is considered a national Peruvian dish. Its defining feature is some type of raw fish that is cured by citrus juices, then spiced with various seasonings. In Costa Rica, the featured fish is typically tilapia or corvina, although mahi-mahi, shark and marlin are also commonly used. In Mexico and some parts of Central America, it is often served with tostadas. El Salvador and Nicaragua produce a version called ceviche de concha negra, which is dark in color and quite picante. And in the United States, its renditions are just as diverse, highlighting everything from shrimp to scallops to octopus.

Maiz (En Todas Sus Formas)

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We’ve already mentioned tamales and champurrado, but corn is such a widespread culinary staple throughout Latin America, that it had to be repeated. Not only does corn form tortillas and masa, which are the base for a wide variety of different snacks and dishes (tacos, tostadas, tamales, etc.), but corn also appears in ancient drinks like Peruvian chicha and atole from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. It’s the highlight of that fantastic Mexican street snack, elote (btw, if you’ve never had elote helado, está buení simo and you need to find some ASAP). Latin American food would be a totally different beast without corn, so we’ve got to sing its praises!