Entertainment

Latinas Are Getting Nostalgic on Twitter After Seeing that Disney+ is Streaming ‘Gotta Kick it Up’

It is possible that Disney has, yet again, out-done itself. On Tuesday, Disney finally launched its much-anticipated streaming service Disney+, the subscription-based platform that is set to release over 600 titles to their customers for $6.99 a month. The buzz around this service has long been building, with people expressing their excitement at the release of their long-forgotten childhood favorites since Disney+’s Twitter account tweeted out all of the titles that would become available on its launch.

For nostalgic millennials who grew up watching Disney Channel Original Movies, the premiere of this service has been nothing short of life-changing. People are taking to their social media feeds to express their excitement over forgotten favorites like “Smart House”, “Zenon: Girl of the 21st Century”, and “Don’t Look Under the Bed”. But the movie that Latinas are most excited about re-watching? “Gotta Kick It Up”. 

For those of you who need a refresher, “Gotta Kick it Up” was a 2002 Disney Channel original movie that starred America Ferrera.

“Gotta Kick It Up” / Netflix

The movie follows a group of middle school girls who are trying to form a dance team in Los Angeles in the face of budget cuts. Scrambling for a coach, the girls turn to their biology teacher, Ms. Bartlett, to whip them into shape. Like any underdog tale, the aspiring dance team starts off as a mess, but with a lot of hard work, the girls soon start to believe in themselves. Through the course of the movie, the girls learn how to put their differences aside and work together to eventually qualify for nationals. 

The Disney Channel movie was notable for not only having a primarily Latinx cast (which is a rarity even today) but for featuring baby-faced versions of successful Latina actresses like America Ferrera and Camille Guaty. Not only that, but the movie’s climax featured a rad dance scene that little girls everywhere tried to imitate in their living rooms (seriously–look it up).

“Gotta Kick It Up” was groundbreaking for its depiction of Latinx life that wasn’t centered on harmful stereotypes or cliche stories.

“Gotta Kick It Up” / Netflix

The movie was written by Meghan Cole and was based on her experience as a Teach for America teacher at Nimitz Middle School in Huntington Park, Los Angeles. The decision to make these Latina students normal teens was a deliberate choice, according to Cole. “I wanted to have a Latino movie, with Latino kids doing great things,” she told The New York Times. “Not being stereotypical kids creating havoc”. Cole also expressed her desire for the movie to “portray positive teenage Latino role models and stress the importance of after-school programs”. 

But arguably “Gotta Kick It Up”‘s greatest legacy was teaching a legion of youngsters the phrase “Sí, se puede!” as well as the history behind it. At one point during the movie, the girls are doubting themselves and their chances of winning the upcoming dance competition. In response, Daisy, the movie’s protagonist, tells the girls a brief history of her grandmother’s involvement in the Chicano movement and tells them about how Cesar Chavez’s rallying cry “Sí, se puede!” served to strengthen and unify the Mexican-American community. Throughout the movie, the girls repeat the phrase whenever they’re happy, doubtful, or scared. 

Of course, Latinas on Twitter are not hesitating to shout from the rooftops the return of “Gotta Kick It Up” to our TV screens.

“Gotta Kick It Up” / Netflix

It’s always exciting to be reminded of something that was so integral to your childhood that you may have forgotten about. The fact that Latinas can watch this movie again, as well as share it with a younger generation, is worth celebrating.

This Latina gave the entire Twitterverse a very informative PSA about Disney+’s movie catalog: 

https://twitter.com/_hadaaa/status/1194345273138597888?s=20

Not all heroes wear capes.

This person had very specific requirements for the conditions under which they’d pull out their wallet for yet ANOTHER streaming service:

Honestly, the service could cost $50 a month and we would shell out the money for a chance to be able to watch this cinematic masterpiece on repeat.

This person knows that his money is being spent on only the most important things in life:

Sometimes, you’ve got to be honest with yourself and decide what your priorities are in life. And sometimes, those priorities are binge-watching Disney Channel Original Movies all day.

This Latina became emotional about the impact that “Gotta Kick It Up” had on her when she was younger:

Yet somehow, it’s frustrating to know that not that much project has been made for Latinx representation in the media almost 15 years later.

Mom fans of this Disney Channel classic will be wise to share this movie about culture and girl power to their little ones.

Gotta Kick It Up / Disney

The 2002 movie might be 15 years old, but its message of female empowerment, friendship, and the importance of samba is more relevant than ever before. Be sure to share this one with your kids ages 7 to 15. Trust us, there’s nothing cuter than hearing the “si se puede” battle cry from the back of your mini-van!

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America Ferrera’s “Superstore” Is Going To Get A Spanish-Language Adaptation In A Win For Inclusion

Entertainment

America Ferrera’s “Superstore” Is Going To Get A Spanish-Language Adaptation In A Win For Inclusion

Fans of the hit NBC comedy Superstore may have been disappointed when it was announced that the series would be cancelled after its sixth season, but there’s good news! The series is going to get a Spanish-language version for international audiences and it will be part of a major expansion for the series. 

The show was well-known for tackling important social issues, particularly around immigration. And a Spanish-language adaptation, particularly one produced out of Mexico, will undoubtedly present an equally interesting take on immigration.

NBC comedy Superstore is getting a Spanish-language adaptation.

Although Superstore is coming to an end on NBC, and will no longer feature America Ferrera, fans of the hit series should celebrate that it’s getting a Spanish-language redo. The show, which focused on the lives of employees at a fictional big box store called Cloud 9 in Missouri, premiered in 2015 and ran for six seasons, with its sixth season set to end on March 25.

“Superstore is a bold workplace comedy with a beating heart, known for its courage to tackle important societal issues,” said Enrique Guillen, executive VP of commercial strategy and international development for Universal Studio Group. “We are grateful to partner with Dopamine to adapt Justin Spitzer’s acclaimed comedy and one of Universal Television’s biggest success stories. This pact to co-produce our valuable IP in a foreign language is the first of many such deals to come.”

The new adaptation is being made under the working title Supertitlan and has received an 48-episode order and will be adapted in Spanish for the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic markets. 

Superstore has remained one of the most popular shows at NBC in its prime. As Variety points out, the Justin Spitzer-created comedy drew in 37 million viewers during its Season 5 run from 2019 to 2020.

And it’s getting a major expansion.

 The Spanish-language adaptation already has a season one order of 48 episodes with each episode coming in at an hour long. For a series that originally consisted of 20 episodes of 30 minutes, that’s a major expansion for the show. For fans of the show, that’s a whole lot more Superstore to look forward to.

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The Definitive List of Latinos in the ‘Star Wars’ Universe

Entertainment

The Definitive List of Latinos in the ‘Star Wars’ Universe

Credit: felineastronaut/Twiiter; theguyinthechair18/Instagram; Star Wars/Twitter

Recently, news broke that beloved Mexican-American director Robert Rodriguez is set to executive producer Disney+’s new Star Wars series, The Book of Boba Fett. This news broke at the same event that Disney announced that Rosario Dawson will be getting her own Star Wars series on Disney+, a Mandalorian spinoff entitled Ahsoka.

Pair these events with Pedro Pascal headlining The Mandalorian, and it appears that Disney is making some real and concerted effort to hire Latino talent.

And the pattern didn’t just start this year. Since the franchise’s reboot in 2015, Disney has consistently hired Latinos to take part in Star Wars Universe in front of and behind the camera.

In light of this, we’ve compiled a definitive list of all of the Latinos that have been involved in the Star Wars Universe. Take a look below!

1. Oscar Isaac as Poe Dameron

Credit: MayThe4rceBWYou/Twitter

Guatemalan-American actor Oscar Isaac was one of the first Latinos to set off Disney’s streak of hiring Latino talent for the Star Wars franchise. Isaac (nee Óscar Isaac Hernández Estrada) played Poe Dameron, a fighter pilot who rose in the ranks to become General of the Resistance. He appeared in all three movies of the Star Wars reboot trilogy: The Force Awakens, The Last Jedi, and The Rise of Skywalker.

2. Pedro Pascal as Mando

Credit: theguyinthechair18/Instagram

Chilean-American actor Pedro Pascal plays the titular character in The Mandalorian (his true name is a spoiler), a solitary bounty hunter who travels to the “outer reaches” of the galaxy in order to protect Baby Yoda.

3. Rosario Dawson as Ahsoka Tano

Credit: Star Wars/Twitter

This season, Rosario Dawson played Ahsoka Tano in The Mandolorian–an alien of the Togruta race who is also a Jedi knight and army commander. It was also recently announced that the actress of Cuban and Puerto Rican descent would be headlining a spinoff series on Disney+ entitled Ahsoka.

4. Diego Luna as Cassian Andor

Credit: felineastronaut/Twitter

Mexican actor Diego Luna played Rebel Alliance soldier Cassian Andor in 2016’s Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. Luna will also star in his own standalone series revolving around Cassian Andor on Disney+ called Andor.

5. Lupita Nyong’o as Maz Kanata

Credit: sw_holocron/Twitter

Mexican-born actress Lupita Nyong’o played alien pirate queen Maz Kanata via motion capture in all three of the Star Wars reboot trilogy: The Force Awakens, The Last Jedi, and The Rise of Skywalker.

6. Benicio Del Toro as DJ

Credit: ComicBookNOW/Twitter

Boricua actor Benicio Del Toro played the villainous hacker DJ in The Last Jedi.

7. Jimmy Smits as Senator Bail Organa

Credit: ComicBookNOW/Twitter

Brooklyn-born Boricua actor Jimmy Smits played Bail Organa in two of the Star Wars prequel movies, Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith as well as reprising his role in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

8. Horatio Sanz as Mythrol

Credit: TheSWU/Twitter

Although you might not recognize him through such heavy character makeup, Chilean-America comedian Horatio Sanz played Mythrol, a wanted fugitive that was carbon-frozen by Pascal’s character in the first episode of The Mandolorian.

9. John Leguizamo as Gor Koresh

Credit: TheRoninNews/Twitter

Again, you’d be hard-pressed to recognize John Leguizamo amidst all the heavy alien makeup, but the Colombian-American actor played the character Gor Koresh in The Mandolorian–boastful forager of the Abyssin alien race.

10. Robert Rodriguez

Credit: Getty Images

As we reported above, Robert Rodriguez is a legendary Mexican-American director who helmed a popular episode of The Mandolorian entitled “The Tragedy”. He is now set to executive produce a new Disney+ Star Wars series called The Book of Boba Fett.

11. Adria Arjona

Credit: adriaarjona/Instagram

Puerto Rican actress Adria Arjona has not officially appeared in any Star Wars properties yet, but it was recently announced that she will be appearing in Diego Luna’s Star Wars spinoff series Andor as a yet-to-be-named character.

12. Pablo Hidalgo

Credit: pabloarteche/Twitter

Pablo Hidalgo is the definition of behind-the-scenes talent. The Chilean-Canadian LucasFilm creative executive is in charge of keeping narrative and creative cohesion between all of the stories within the Star Wars Universe. In essence, he is the definitive Star Wars expert.

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