Entertainment

Country Music Is Losing Steam As Latin Music Experienced Major Growth In Popularity Last Year

This past year, Latin music has reached new heights in terms of streaming and consumption throughout the U.S. A new report from data company BuzzAngle, which measures music consumption, shows Latin music accounted for 9.4 percent of all album listening in 2018, measured by combining physical and digital sales, song downloads and on-demand streams. This comes as no surprise for the genre that has seen major signs of growth in the last few years.

A new report shows that Latin albums are now more popular compared to their counterparts in country music.

In 2018, people in the U.S. consumed more Latin music than country music as the genre captured 9.4 percent of all album listening, while country music ranked at 8.7 percent. The prior year, country music accounted for 8.1 percent of album-listening, while Latin music checked in at 7.5 percent.
Individual songs also surged in popularity as consumption increased from 9.5 percent to 10.8 percent in 2018, while country music clocked in at 7.8 percent.

While the report doesn’t make it clear what genres fall under the label of “Latin,” it’s more than likely that reggaeton’s surge in Latin American pop account for a large part of that growth.

When it comes to music videos, Latin artists dominated there as well.

Latin artists were responsible for eight of the 10 most viewed videos on Youtube last year. That’s why it’s no surprise that the three artists with the most views on Youtube in 2018 were are all Spanish-speaking: Ozuna (20 million subscribers; 8.7 billion views), J Balvin (18 million, 7.1 billion) and Bad Bunny (13 million, 7 billion). Overall, over 30 percent of the songs that appeared on YouTube’s global chart involved Latin performers.

Ninety-five percent of Latin music consumption came from on-demand streaming. Sixty-three percent of total consumption came from video versus 31 percent from audio. Latin music was the only genre with more streams from video than audio. It’s a reflection of the genre’s popularity on video streaming services like YouTube.

Many are crediting this growth to the crossover popularity of stars like Bad Bunny and Ozuna.

Bad Bunny, Ozuna, and J Balvin were some of the biggest artists of 2018 and it showed as many mainstream artists like Cardi B and Drake collaborated with Spanish-speaking artists. If awards are any indicator of success, Latino artists are up for many Grammy awards this year as well. Cardi B, J Balvin and Bad Bunny are nominated for Record of the Year with their big hit “I Like It”, while Camila Cabello is nominated for Best Pop Solo Performance for her single “Havana”.

Many of these artists have received high exposure the last few years that may be due back to streaming. Spotify’s popular “Baila Reggaeton” playlist is one of the most streamed playlists on the platform. With weekly updates to the playlist, listeners were constantly in touch on the latest and trendiest songs in the genre.

Where can Latin music go from here? Looks like only up.

Whether its growth in music consumption or more representation at major music festivals, Latino artists are making their names heard and streamed across the U.S. As more people listen to music platforms like Apple Music and Spotify, artists that they may have never checked out on their own are becoming more accessible than ever.

There was a similar rise in popularity of Latin music during the mid-2000s with artists like Daddy Yankee and Don Omar. What’s the difference today? Streaming and the amount of cross-over hits many of these artists have had with already established English artists. There’s no telling where the genre is going but we can’t wait to hear it.

“Even though you don’t understand what I’m saying, you are going to really feel it,” J Balvin told NBC News. “The same thing happened to me when I used to listen to English music. I didn’t even understand one word. You know? But, it just makes me feel great.”


READ: Coachella Has Announced Their 2019 Line Up And Latinos Are Taking Over The Festival

Show some support for these artists by hitting the share button below! 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Cardi B and Olivia Rodrigo Had an Adorable Exchange on Twitter and Now Fans Are Calling For a Collab

Entertainment

Cardi B and Olivia Rodrigo Had an Adorable Exchange on Twitter and Now Fans Are Calling For a Collab

Photos via Getty Images; olivia.rodrigo/Instagram

You may have heard of Olivia Rodrigo, the 17-year-old Disney Channel actress who has recently take the music industry by storm with the success of her debut single, “Driver’s License”.

Well you wouldn’t be the only one who is thinking about her. Recently, Cardi B tweeted about the viral song, namely lamenting over the fact that she does not have her driver’s license.

On Tuesday, Cardi tweeted out her frustration about the fact that she has to rely on other people to fulfill her late-night McDonald’s cravings.

“Just like that girl [who] wrote a song about getting her driver’s license, Imma write a song about the struggle of not having a drivers license,” she wrote. “I really wanted my McDonald’s at 4am last night instead of today, but I couldn’t so I felt asleep hungry.” More relatable words have never been spoken, tbh.

Shocked that the Bronx-born rapper even knows who she is, Rodrigo tweeted a response back at Cardi.

“Girl i will pick u up and take u wherever u wanna go,” Rodrigo wrote back.

Cardi, for her part, seemed excited to find a driver to take her on late-night McDonald’s runs. She wrote back: “Yaaayyy!!! Let’s go to McDonald’s and get happy meals!”

Cue the influx of Twitter stans demanding a future Olivia Rodrigo x Cardi B collab.

Olivia Rodrigo is just as surprised about “Driver’s License” success as everyone else is.

Rodrigo recently told Billboard that this past week, when “Driver’s License” shot to No. 1 on the Hot 100 chart has been “the weirdest week of my whole life.”

Rodrigo was a relatively unknown Disney Channel star on Disney+’s “High School Musical: The Musical: The Series” before this song hit the airwaves. Now she’s a pop sensation.

“So many people that I look up to have reached out and expressed their love for the song, which is absolutely surreal,” she told Billboard. But I truly am just the same 17-year-old girl, doing statistics homework in my bedroom.”

While many people are wondering what Rodrigo’s background is, she is proudly half-Filipino.

While some people have mistakenly called Olivia Rodriguez Latina, she is actually of Filipino descent, just like previous “High School Musical” star, Vanessa Hudgens. Just like Latin American countries, the Philippines were colonized by Spain–that is why so many people of Filipino descent have Spanish-sounding last names.

Rodrigo has talked at length about her cultural and familial roots. “My great-grandfather immigrated here from the Philippines when he was just a teenager. He’s my grandma’s dad, and my grandpa is also Filipino as well,” Rodrigo revealed in an interview with the Center for Asian American Media back in 2018.

“My dad grew up in a house where they were always making Filipino food, his grandpa always spoke Tagalog. All of those traditions have trickled down to our generation.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Photo via selenagomez/Instagram

Good news, Selenators! Word on the street is that Selena Gomez will soon be dropping her first-ever Spanish language album. The rumors started after Gomez dropped a surprising (and beautiful!) new Spanish-language single, “De Una Vez”.

Soon after the single dropped, rumors of a full Spanish-language studio album began to swirl when murals promoting “De Una Vez” and a yet-unreleased single “Baila Conmigo” popped up across, Mexico.

To make matters even better, Selena already dropped “De Una Vez”‘s music video.

The lush and imaginative video has been garnering praise for its inclusion of Latin American visuals and symbols. Gomez hired Tania Verduzco and Adrian Perez to direct her video–a husband and wife team who hail from Mexico and Spain, respectively and go by the moniker Los Pérez.

Of hiring Spanish speakers to direct her video, Gomez revealed to Vogue online that the decision was intentional. “If I was going to completely immerse myself into a project inspired by Latin culture, I wanted to work with native Spanish speaking creators,” she said.

And indeed, Verduzco and Perez tried to infuse as much Latin spirit into the video’s conception as possible.

“Magical realism has always been part of the Latin culture, whether it be in art or telenovelas,” Gomez told Vogue. “I wanted [to capture] that sense of a supernatural world.”

They accomplished this sense of magical realism by utilizing motifs from Mexican folk art, like Milagro, which is symbolized by the glowing heart that is beating within Gomez’s chest throughout the video.

“We wanted to play with powerful language and images. We designed the heart—we call it the Milagro in Mexican culture—and its light to be a metaphor for the healing throughout the story,” Verduzco told Vogue.

Selena Gomez fans are especially excited about this project because Gomez has long hinted at her desire to release a Spanish-language album.

Back in 2011, Gomez tweeted about her plans to eventually record an entire album in Spanish. “Can’t wait for y’all to hear the Spanish record;) it’s sounding so cool,” she wrote.

She retweeted the sentiment on Thursday with the comment: “I think it will be worth the wait”–which many fans took as confirmation that a full studio album is on its way.

It’s worth noting that Gomez has already dipped her toe into the Latin music scene with 2010’s “Un Año Sin Lluvia” and 2018’s DJ Snake, Ozuna and Cardi B collab, “Taki Taki”.

As for the difficulty of recording songs in a second language, Gomez said that it was a practice that came naturally.

“I actually think I sing better in Spanish. That was something I discovered,” she said in an interview for Apple Music. “It was a lot of work, and look, you cannot mispronounce anything. It is something that needed to be precise, and needed to be respected by the audience I’m going to release this for.”

She continued: “Of course I want everyone to enjoy the music, but I am targeting my fan base. I’m targeting my heritage, and I couldn’t be more excited.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com